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One of art history’s most notorious crimes is solved in this true caper that reads “like a finely tuned suspense thriller” (Publishers Weekly). In 1961, a thief broke into London’s National Gallery and committed the most sensational art heist in British history by stealing the museum’s prized painting, Francisco Goya’s The Duke of Wellington. Despite international attention and a tireless investigation, the case remained unsolved for four years—until an elderly gentleman named Kempton Bunton confessed to the crime. Shortly after turning himself in, Bunton invoked an obscure law to maintain his innocence. He maintained that stealing the painting wasn’t a crime because he intended to return it—an improbable defense strategy that led to a bizarre courtroom drama and an extraordinary verdict. Over fifty years later, author Alan Hirsch delves into the facts of the case via court documents, National Gallery archives, previously unseen materials, and interviews with people involved in the theft and trial. Here, in this “intriguing addition to the annals of modern art history” Hirsh reveals shocking new evidence and solves the infamous crime that riveted a nation (Booklist).
Train at the world's first crime academy! Laugh-out-loud stories from the bestselling author of HORRIBLE HISTORIES. 2 books in 1! Want to rob the rich and give to the poor? Worried about getting caught? Then why not train at the world's first crime academy! Book 1: Classes in Kidnapping Book 2: Safecracking for Students
This title was previously published as Uncommon Youth The true account behind the glamorous life and tragic times of J. Paul Getty III, whose kidnapping made headlines in 1973, as seen in Ridley Scott's All the Money in the World and the FX series Trust by Danny Boyle J. Paul ("Little Paul") Getty III, the grandson of Getty Oil founder J. Paul Getty, may have been cursed by money and privilege from the moment he was born. Falling in with the wrong people and practically abandoned by his famous family, Getty was a child of his international jet set era, moving from Marrakesh to Rome, nightclubs to well-appointed drug dens. His high-profile kidnapping defined the decade—and was permanently memorable for the ear that was mailed to his mother as evidence of the kidnappers' intentions. Kidnapped is richly reported, and includes many interviews with Getty himself conducted from the late 1970s to the early 1990s, that raise new angles about the case. How much did Getty acquiesce to the kidnappers? Why wouldn't his rich-as-Croesus grandfather pay the ransom, which began at the equivalent of $550,000 in lire and bulged to 3.6 million as the months dragged on? Charles Fox began following and researching this story since the days shortly after Getty's disappearance. Fox's writing captures the voices of models and maids, mistresses and mothers, carabinieri and club-owners, drug dealers and drivers, alongside the Getty family members themselves to paint an evocative portrait of an era and one of its most misunderstood participants.
In an important addition to the series, this book tells the story of 20 leading revenue law cases. It goes well beyond technical analysis to explore questions of philosophical depth, historical context and constitutional significance. The editors have assembled a stellar team of tax scholars, including historians as well as lawyers, practitioners as well as academics, to provide a wide range of fresh perspectives on familiar and unfamiliar decisions. The whole collection is prefaced by the editors' extended introduction on the peculiar significance of case-law in revenue matters. This publication is a thought provoking and engaging showcase of tax writing that is accessible equally to specialists and non-specialists.
Full account of the 4 years between the baby's kidnapping, March 1, 1932, and the execution of Bruno Richard Hauptmann, April, 3, 1936.
A dual biography of the greatest opposing generals of their age who ultimately became fixated on one another, by a bestselling historian. 'Thoroughly enjoyable, beautifully written and meticulously researched' Observer On the morning of the battle of Waterloo, the Emperor Napoleon declared that the Duke of Wellington was a bad general, the British were bad soldiers and that France could not fail to win an easy victory. Forever afterwards historians have accused him of gross overconfidence, and massively underestimating the calibre of the British commander opposed to him. Andrew Roberts presents an original, highly revisionist view of the relationship between the two greatest captains of their age. Napoleon, who was born in the same year as Wellington - 1769 - fought Wellington by proxy years earlier in the Peninsula War, praising his ruthlessness in private while publicly deriding him as a mere 'sepoy general'. In contrast, Wellington publicly lauded Napoleon, saying that his presence on a battlefield was worth forty thousand men, but privately wrote long memoranda lambasting Napoleon's campaigning techniques. Although Wellington saved Napoleon from execution after Waterloo, Napoleon left money in his will to the man who had tried to assassinate Wellington. Wellington in turn amassed a series of Napoleonic trophies of his great victory, even sleeping with two of the Emperor's mistresses.
First principles -- Andrew Johnson survives -- Down goes Nixon -- The Clinton predicament -- Unable to discharge -- Lessons -- The case of Trump
second spans the period between that conflict and the Second Anglo-Afghan War, 1878-80, while the third terminates with the Anglo-Russian Convention of 1907, which effectively marked the end of the confrontation.
The historical links between Geology and Medicine are surprisingly numerous and diverse. This, the first ever volume dedicated to the subject, contains contributions from an international authorship of geologists, historians and medical professionals. Rocks, minerals, fossils and earths have been used therapeutically since earliest times and details recorded on ancient papyri, clay tablets, medieval manuscripts and early published sources. Pumice was used to clean teeth, antimony to heal wounds, clays as antidotes to poison, gold to cure haemorrhoids and warts, and gem pastes to treat syphilis and the plague, while mineral springs preserved health. Geology was crucial in the development of public health. Medical men making important geological contributions include Steno, Worm, Parkinson, Bigsby, William Hunter, Jenner, John Hulke, Conan Doyle, Gorini and various Antarctic explorers. A History of Geology and Medicine will be of particular interest to Earth scientists, medical personnel, historians of science and the general reader who has an interest in science.
Marketers, creative writers, and individuals for whom copywriting forms part of their job are often required to produce innovative and engaging copy in a short space of time. Creativity is not always to hand, and therefore on some occasions additional help is required to find the right phrase, description or slogan. Gabay's Copywriting Compendium contains a wealth of inspiring tips, ideas and descriptions to aid the writing process, such as advice on spelling and grammar, examples of rhyming words, suggested euphemisms, and odd facts.
Originally published in 1904, this is a combination of Biographical and Bibliographical Dictionary based on the following principles: First - A brief biographical notice of every important author known in literary history; Second - A bibliographical notice of his principal or best-known works.
Although Elizabeth Bishop is perhaps better known as a masterful poet, she was a dazzling and compelling prose writer too, as this centenary edition of her prose demonstrates. From her witty, unforgettable portraits of Marianne Moore and the Sitwells to her engaging childhood recollections of Canada and Massachusetts, her writing reflects a lifelong fascination with memory and travel, and her unique eye and ear for people and places. This new volume - edited by the Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Lloyd Schwartz - includes virtually all her published shorter prose pieces and a number of prose works not published until after her death. Included here are her stories, crucial memoirs, literary and travel essays, book reviews, and - for the first time - the original draft of Brazil, the Life World Library volume she repudiated in its published version, as well as extensive selections from the correspondence between Bishop and the poet Anne Stevenson. Here is a rich and revealing selection, and the indispensible companion to the poems.

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