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Although recent years have seen major advances in science and technology, the social aspect of life still presents major problems for western societies. The general increase in destructive, antisocial behaviour over past decades has raised the profile of social issues, yet effective ideas to tackle the difficulties are often nowhere to be found. Many decades ago, Rudolf Steiner suggested new ways of organizing society and engaging with social questions. This book presents his inner, esoteric perspective on such concerns. The starting point, asserts Steiner, must be the proper valuing of the human element in the world, and a deeper understanding of its relation to nature and the cosmos. The organization of society cannot be made in an arbitrary way, but should reflect the relationship of human beings to the spiritual world. Steiner goes on to discuss the threefold archetype of social life - the political state, economics, and the spiritual/cultural aspect - and how these can interact in a healthy way, leading to a vibrant, evolving society. These popular lectures - originally published as The Inner Aspect of the Social Question - appear here in a new translation and with the addition of a previously unpublished lecture.
In this first biography of Emerson, he gives a vivid picture of how the college came to be such a special place. But this is not a dry history of an organisation: it is brought to life with vibrant descriptions of many people, including the colleges founders Francis and Elizabeth Edmunds and John Davy, but also students, teachers, cooks, gardeners, accountants, administrators, and many others. Spence studies the anthroposophic spiritual basis that formed the bedrock of the college.
EDITION of undercover-collective "Paul Smith", probably Melbourne/Australia - general purpose: mental hygiene in "esoteric matters", special purpose: esoterism around "Rennes-le-Chateau and Berenger Sauniere" - covering ca. 21.000 titles in 2017
Samples of Steiner's work are to be found in this introductory reader in which Stephen E. Usher brings together excerpts from Steiner's many talks and writings on Social and political science. This volume also features an editorial introduction, commentary and notes. Topics include: psychological cognition; the social question; the social question and theosophy; Memoranda of 1917; the metamorphosis of intelligence; culture, law, and economy; and Central Europe between East and West.
‘Whatever turbulent outward events occur in the world, whatever form is taken by things seeking to work their way out of the depths of human evolution, we only really hearken to the true, underlying nature of these events ... if we observe the world from a spiritual perspective.’ – Rudolf Steiner. In seeking to heal the many social crises of our time, Rudolf Steiner urges us to turn away from ‘fixed principles, theories or social dogmas’ and to rediscover the real nature of the human being. This inner reality – that cannot be understood in materialistic or deterministic ways – is the only basis on which society can truly be founded. But it is not sufficient to speak of well-meaning ideas, he says, unless we are also active in working for change; change that begins with each of us. In 1919, a year marked by strong social and political upheavals, Steiner was deeply concerned with questions relating to society. Having published a book on the subject (Towards Social Renewal), he embarked on a major campaign to publicize his ‘threefold’ social ideas. In addition to public lectures, however, Steiner sought to deepen the subject in a series of talks to members of the Anthroposophical Society. These lectures, gathered in this volume, reveal the ‘inner’ or ‘esoteric’ aspects of the social question. They complement Steiner’s very practical efforts to realize threefolding in the historical context of his time. Whilst Steiner’s suggestions for social change may not seem self-evident to pragmatic thinking, they will strike a resonant chord in many who seek deeper answers to the social problems of our times – problems that politicians seem unable to remedy. Amidst the many themes tackled here, Steiner addresses the issue of nationalism as a retrograde tendency; the tasks of Central Europe and Britain in relation to the East; the incarnation of Ahriman in the West, and the historical incarnation of Lucifer in the third millennium BC.
Ethical responsibility has intellectual and practical implications for social researchers. This book explores a range of issues, theories and questions, enabling readers to reflect upon, understand and critique these with confidence. With helpful examples and a glossary of terms, it is essential reading for new and experienced researchers alike.
A compact, accessible introduction to the basic writings of the great modern spiritual teacher who has been an immense influence on contemporary education, literature, art, science, and philosophy.
The author traces the origins of social capital through the work of Becker, Bourdieu and Coleman, and comprehensively reviews the literature across the social sciences.
First Published in 1990. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Despite the rapid spread of Buddhism the historical origins of Buddhsit thought and practice remain obscure.This work describes the genesis of the Tantric movement and in some ways an example of the feudalization of Indian society. Drawing on primary documents from sanskrit, prakrit, tibetan, Bengali, and chinese author shows how changes in medieval Indian society, including economic and patronage crises, a decline in women`s participation and the formation of large monastic orders led to the rise of the esoteric tradition in India.
As the central event of modern times, the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 remains a major focus of historical investigation and controversy. Unavoidably, the conception of the historical problems and the evidence presented are shaped by the historian's view on both the desirability and the inevitability of the Bolshevik Revolution. The years 1890-1917 are particularly important as the crucible in which revolutionary forces developed. In the nineties, Finance Minister Sergei Witte laid the groundwork for a modern economy. While he achieved many of his economic goals, the stresses and strains of forced draft industrialization contributed to the revival of the revolutionary movement; political instability was their immediate effect. By the turn of the century the peasants were in open revolt, an alienated and militant urban proletariat was emerging, and a cohesive liberal opposition was beginning to develop. All these groups demanded fundamental reforms including full political rights for all citizens. By 1905 they had gathered sufficient strength to force the government to issue a constitution and a legislature called the Duma. Neither side, however, was satisfied. The Imperial government tried to take back what it had granted under duress and the opposition parties attempted to discredit the system as "sham constitutionalism. " Only a small center was willing to work with the government and the government was not always willing to work with them.
Currently there is a great deal of interest in philosophical issues in the teaching and learning of both mathematics and science education. In this book Ernest has collected together papers from the foremost researchers and practitioners in the philosophy of mathematics education and related areas, together with a selection of papers from the International Congress of Mathematics Education held in Quebec in 1992. Throughout, the outstanding feature of the collection is its multidisciplinary approach to the field of study. This book is the second in Paul Ernest's "Studies in Mathematics Education" series.
"Discusses philosophy, social science, economics, ethics, ethical idealism, and religion in relation to the Social Question. The author argues that, heading into the 20th Century, the most conspicuous and disturbing fact of contemporary life is its social unrest. No institution of society--the family, the state, or the church--is so fixed in stability or in sanctity as to be safe from radical transformation. The growth of great industry, with its combinations of capital and its organizations of labor, the unprecedented accumulation of wealth in the hands of the few, and the equally unprecedented increase of power in the hands of the many, these point to new social adjustments and awaken a new social spirit. It is the age of the Social Question. Those who have embarked on enterprises of social service and social reformation feel beneath their ventures the sustaining movement of the main current of the time"--Chapter. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
By making explicit linkages both to social work practice and to the history of management thought, covering the rapidly expanding field of nonprofit studies, and incorporating management approaches from Henri Fayol's principles to Total Quality Management, this pioneering work grounds the practice of social administration in the profession of social work and agency-based practice better than any text presently available. The book also addresses ways in which the strategic vision of social administrators can be used to build humane and lasting welfare institutions, further social justice, and confront oppression. To accomplish this task, the authors blend several perspectives: social administration as management, as a form of social work practice emphasizing professional and community leadership, as decision making influenced by values and ethics and as institution building. Divided into an introduction, an afterword, and twenty-five topical chapters, Social Administration discusses issues of executive and program leadership as well as such environmental concerns as community, social agency, and a range of special topics, including accountability, ethics, contracting, and working with boards.
The crisis around teaching and learning of mathematics and its use in everyday life and work relate to a number of issues. These include: The doubtful transferability of school maths to real life contexts, the declining participation in A level and higher education maths courses, the apparent exclusion of some groups, such as women and the aversion of many people to maths. This book addresses these issues by considering a number of key problems in maths education and numeracy: *differences among social groups, especially those related to gender and social class *the inseparability of cognition and emotion in mathematical activity *the understanding of maths anxiety in traditional psychological, psychoanalytical and feminist theories *how adults' numerate thinking and performance must be understood in context. The author's findings have practical applications in education and training, such as clarifying problems of the transfer of learning, and of countering maths anxiety.
Hartmut Rosa advances an account of the temporal structure of society from the perspective of critical theory. He identifies three categories of change in the tempo of modern social life: technological acceleration, evident in transportation, communication, and production; the acceleration of social change, reflected in cultural knowledge, social institutions, and personal relationships; and acceleration in the pace of life, which happens despite the expectation that technological change should increase an individual's free time. According to Rosa, both the structural and cultural aspects of our institutions and practices are marked by the "shrinking of the present," a decreasing time period during which expectations based on past experience reliably match the future. When this phenomenon combines with technological acceleration and the increasing pace of life, time seems to flow ever faster, making our relationships to each other and the world fluid and problematic. It is as if we are standing on "slipping slopes," a steep social terrain that is itself in motion and in turn demands faster lives and technology. As Rosa deftly shows, this self-reinforcing feedback loop fundamentally determines the character of modern life.

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