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In this bestselling account of the colonization of Australia, Robert Hughes explores how the convict transportation system created the country we know today. Digging deep into the dark history of England's infamous efforts to move 160,000 men and women thousands of miles to the other side of the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Hughes has crafted a groundbreaking, definitive account of the settling of Australia. Tracing the European presence in Australia from early explorations through the rise and fall of the penal colonies, and featuring 16 pages of illustrations and 3 maps, The Fatal Shore brings to life the incredible true history of a country we thought we knew.
Draws on diverse original materials to recount the European settlement of Australia, from the 1788 landing of the first prison fleet to 1868
In 1519, a few hundred Europeans led by Hernán Cortés sailed from Cuba to the Mexican mainland, where they encountered representatives of the Aztec Empire. Their Iberian history, culture and religion, and their experience in the Greater Antilles made conquest and riches the aim of these adventurers. They regarded themselves as heroes in a romantic crusade of good against evil. Each member of the expedition sought to acquire precious metals and to become a lord of enslaved native labor. Their horses and steel swords, aided by native disunity and susceptibility to Old World diseases, ensured their success. This analysis of the conquest of Mexico stands in contrast to previous narratives that either reduce the conquest to a contest between Cortés and Montezuma, or describe a near miraculous victory of European ingenuity and Western values over Indian superstition and savagery. The author re-frames the clash of civilizations in New World prehistory that left inhabitants at a disadvantage.
The communicative process allows, sometimes forces, one to make connections about the self and simultaneously how the self relates to the other and the world. The bonus of communicating is that one makes connections with other individuals. Not only are social connections made, but political, business, spiritual, esoteric, and functional connections as well. Each connection holds the possibility of teaching the person more about the self and the world. This book helps individuals understand the dynamics of change particularly by focusing on enthymematic communication that can be used to effect change. It demonstrates the simultaneous potential of communication to both constrain and free the individual. The first part of the book establishes the theoretical ground by identifying the definitional issues, defining communication, and relating content and style to the sense-making function of interaction. The second part examines the primary consequences of interaction in both self and relational identity. Communication creates self-identification as well as relational identity, both of which provide a means of stabilizing the self and simultaneously allowing for change.
The story of John Devoy’s 1876 Catalpa rescue is a tale of heroism, creativity, and the triumph of independent spirit in pursuit of freedom. The daily log on board the whaling ship Catalpa begins with the typical recount of a crew intact and a spirit unfettered, but such quiet words deceive the truth of the audacious enterprise that came to be known as one of the most important rescues in Irish American history. John Devoy’s men rescued six Irish political prisoners from the Australian coast, allowing millions of fellow Irishmen and American-Fenians, many of whom secretly financed the dangerous plot, to draw courage from the newly exiled prisoners. Philip Fennell and Marie King tell the story from John Devoy’s own records and the ship's logbooks. John Devoy's Catalpa Expedition includes an introduction by Terry Golway and the personal diaries, letters, and reports from John Devoy and his men.

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