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A riveting look at how dog and humans became best friends, and the first history of dog domestication to include insights from indigenous peoples In this fascinating book, Raymond Pierotti and Brandy Fogg change the narrative about how wolves became dogs and in turn, humanity’s best friend. Rather than describe how people mastered and tamed an aggressive, dangerous species, the authors describe coevolution and mutualism. Wolves, particularly ones shunned by their packs, most likely initiated the relationship with Paleolithic humans, forming bonds built on mutually recognized skills and emotional capacity. This interdisciplinary study draws on sources from evolutionary biology as well as tribal and indigenous histories to produce an intelligent, insightful, and often unexpected story of cooperative hunting, wolves protecting camps, and wolf-human companionship. This fascinating assessment is a must-read for anyone interested in human evolution, ecology, animal behavior, anthropology, and the history of canine domestication.
An unprecedented undertaking by academics reflecting an extraordinary vision of world history, this landmark multivolume encyclopedia focuses on specific themes of human development across cultures era by era, providing the most in-depth, expansive presentation available of the development of humanity from a global perspective. Well-known and widely respected historians worked together to create and guide the project in order to offer the most up-to-date visions available. * Contributions by a team of over 800 historians, anthropologists, sociologists, and other academics, focused on a world-based view of history, including well-known researchers as well as innovative newcomers who have made remarkable contributions. This multi-faceted approach offers a work that combines orthodox views with creative new perspectives * Twenty-one volumes covering the breadth of human history, in nine eras: Beginnings of Human Society; Early Civilizations, 4000–1000 BCE; Classical Traditions, 1000 BCE–300 CE; Expanding Regional Civilizations, 300—1000; Intensified Hemispheric Interactions, 1000–1500; The First Global Age, 1450–1770; The Age of Revolutions, 1750–1914; Crisis and Achievement, 1900–1945; Promises and Paradoxes, 1945–Present * General chronologies plotting large-scale changes in human organization, in areas such as population flow, technological development, and the evolution of social and political institutions * Hundreds of images and maps, plus charts and bibliographies * A wide range of primary source excerpts (some translated into English for the first time) giving students firsthand exposure to the raw materials of historical research
The Earth and Its Peoples was one of the first texts to present world history in a balanced, global framework, shifting the focus away from political centers of power. This truly global text for the world history survey course employs a fundamental theme--the interaction of human beings and the environment--to compare different times, places, and societies. Special emphasis is given to technology (in its broadest sense) and how technological development underlies all human activity. Highly acclaimed in their fields of study, the authors bring a wide array of expertise to the program. A combination of strong scholarship and detailed pedagogy gives the book its reputation for rigor and student accessibility. The Fourth Edition features extensive new coverage of world events, including globalization in the new millennium. Coverage of China has also been extensively reorganized and rewritten. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
The domestication of plants and animals was one of the greatest steps forward taken by mankind. Although it was first achieved long ago, we still need to know what led to it and how, and even when, it took place. Only when we have this understanding will we be able to appreciate fully the important social and economic consequences of this step. Even more important, an understanding of this achievement is basic to any insight into modern man's relationship to his habitat. In the last decade or two a change in methods of investigating these events has taken place, due to the mutual realization by archaeologists and natural scientists that each held part of the key and neither alone had the whole. Inevitably, perhaps, the floodgate that was opened has resulted in a spate of new knowledge, which is scattered in the form of specialist reports in diverse journals. This volume results from presentations at the Institute of Archaeology, London University, discussing the domestication and exploitation of plants and animals. Workers in the archaeological, anthropological, and biological fields attempted to bridge the gap between their respective disciplines through personal contact and discussion. Modern techniques and the result of their application to the classical problems of domestication, selection, and spread of cereals and of cattle were discussed, but so were comparable problems in plants and animals not previously considered in this context. Although there were differing opinions on taxonomic classification, the editors have standardized and simplified the usage throughout this book. In particular, they have omitted references to authorities and adopted the binomial classification for both botanical and zoological names. They followed this procedure in all cases except where sub-specific differences are discussed and also standardized orthography of sites. Peter J. Ucko is professor emeritus of archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. His research interests include the history of archaeology, prehistoric art and images, and interpretation of archaeological collections and site displays. G. W. Dimbleby (1917-2000) was Chair of Human Environment at the Institute of Archaeology, London University. He was the founding editor of the Journal of Archeological Science. Throughout his life he served on important committees such as Science-based Archaeology Committee of the Science Research Council and the Committee for Rescue Archaeology of the Ancient Monuments Board of England.
The domestication of plants and animals was one of the greatest steps forward taken by mankind. Although it was first achieved long ago, we still need to know what led to it and how, and even when, it took place. Only when we have this understanding will we be able to appreciate fully the important social and economic consequences of this step. Even more important, an understanding of this achievement is basic to any insight into modern man's relationship to his habitat. In the last decade or two a change in methods of investigating these events has taken place, due to the mutual realization by archaeologists and natural scientists that each held part of the key and neither alone had the whole. Inevitably, perhaps, the floodgate that was opened has resulted in a spate of new knowledge, which is scattered in the form of specialist reports in diverse journals. This volume results from presentations at the Institute of Archaeology, London University, discussing the domestication and exploitation of plants and animals. Workers in the archaeological, anthropological, and biological fields attempted to bridge the gap between their respective disciplines through personal contact and discussion. Modern techniques and the result of their application to the classical problems of domestication, selection, and spread of cereals and of cattle were discussed, but so were comparable problems in plants and animals not previously considered in this context. Although there were differing opinions on taxonomic classification, the editors have standardized and simplified the usage throughout this book. In particular, they have omitted references to authorities and adopted the binomial classification for both botanical and zoological names. They followed this procedure in all cases except where sub-specific differences are discussed and also standardized orthography of sites.
The study of European archaeology dates back to the 19th century, but the number of archaeologists, projects, and publications has increased greatly during the last three decades. With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the restructuring of several countries, archaeology in Europe has more opportunity for interaction and research than previously was possible. This comprehensive volume covers the Prehistoric period in Europe, from the earliest appearance of humans to the rise of the Roman Empire and includes the Paleolithic, Mesolithic Bronze and Iron Ages. Throughout these periods, the major developments and explored using the archaeological data including: technology; trade; settlement; warfare; ritual. Using methodologies and theories that were previously unknown in Europe decades ago, new discoveries and arguments are included in the research as well as reevaluations of previous discoveries. This work also includes a present geographical summary and how it impacts the current archaeological discoveries and research being conducted. European Prehistory: A Survey includes many comprehensive maps and site photos. It will be a vital resource to prehistoric archaeologists, anthropologists and historians in and outside of Europe.
written by a world authority on animal behavioura highly original contribution to the subjectcovers behaviour and domestication of farm, zoo and companion animalsThis book synthesizes existing knowledge of the process of domestication and how it has affected the behaviour of captive wild and domesticated animals. Three broad themes are addressed:Genetic contributions to the process of domesticationExperimental contributions to the process of domesticationThe process of feralization (i.e. the adaptation of domesticated animals when returned to their natural habitat)

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