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Thoroughly updated throughout, the fourth edition of The Gendered Society explores current thinking about gender, both inside academia and in our everyday lives. Michael Kimmel challenges the claim that gender is limited to women's experiences-his compelling and balanced study of gender includes both masculine and feminine perspectives. Kimmel makes three bold and persuasive statements about gender. First, he demonstrates that gender differences are often extremely exaggerated; in fact, he argues that men and women have much more in common than we think they do. Kimmel also challenges the pop psychologists who suggest that gender difference is the cause of inequality between the sexes; instead, he reveals that the reverse is true-gender inequality itself is the cause of the differences between men and women. Finally, he illustrates that gender is not merely an element of individual identity, but a socially constructed institutional phenomenon. Essential reading for both students and scholars, The Gendered Society is an authoritative, incisive, and lively statement about contemporary gender relations from one of the country's foremost thinkers on the subject.
This second edition has been revised to include many new readings. These selections, both classic and contemporary, focus on the two major issues in gender studies - gender difference and male domination.
Now in its second Canadian edition, The Gendered Society is an authoritative study of contemporary gender relations that challenges a common tendency to treat gender as an issue for women alone. Organized into three parts, the text explores concepts of gender through a variety of disciplineswhile discussing how gender permeates our everyday lives as a socially constructed phenomenon.
The battle between the sexes has raged on for centuries; however, are men and women really from different planets? In The Gendered Society Reader, Fifth Edition, coeditors Michael Kimmel and Amy Aronson pull together an array of dynamic voices--both male and female, classic and contemporary--to examine various interpretations of gender. These lively, in-depth readings explore gender discourse over a wide range of disciplines, focusing primarily on two central issues: difference and domination. Carefully balanced to reflect the diversity of its subject, this text addresses provocative and fundamental questions including: * How are males and females different? * What do these differences mean? * How do various cultures and religions interpret gender? * Why do societies continue to differentiate people on the basis of gender? * Why is it that almost every known society is based on male domination? Michael Kimmel's textbook, The Gendered Society, Fifth Edition (OUP, 2013), provides a perfect complement for classroom use.
Articles and essays on the construction of male sexuality by a pioneer in the field of masculinity studies.
This book defends progressive political interventions to erode the gendered division of labor as legitimate exercises of coercive political power. The gendered division of labor is widely regarded as the linchpin of gender injustice. The process of gender equalization in domestic and paid labor allocations has stalled, and a growing number of scholars argue that, absent political intervention, further eroding of the gendered division of labor will not be forthcoming anytime soon. Certain political interventions could jumpstart the stalled gender revolution, but beyond their prospects for effectiveness, such interventions stand in need of another kind of justification. In a diverse, liberal state, reasonable citizens will disagree about what makes for a good life and a good society. Because a fundamental commitment of liberalism is to limit political intrusion into the lives of citizens and allow considerable space for those citizens to act on their own conceptions of the good, questions of legitimacy arise. Legitimacy concerns the constraints we must abide by as we seek collective political solutions to our shared social problems, given that we will disagree, reasonably, both about what constitutes a problem and about what costs we should be willing to incur to fix it. The interventions in question would effectively subsidize gender egalitarian lifestyles at a cost to those who prefer to maintain a traditional gendered division of labor. In a pluralistic, liberal society where many citizens reasonably resist the feminist agenda, can we legitimately use scarce public resources to finance coercive interventions to subsidize gender egalitarianism? This book argues that they can, and moreover, that they can even by the lights of political liberalism, a particularly demanding theory of liberal legitimacy.
"Emily Kane shows clearly that most parents understand children's personality to be some combination of nature and nurture, and many wish they could help nurture their children to escape gender traps. Yet these parents are themselves trapped by the gender structure itself, especially the accountability they feel to other people's expectations, and the fear that if their boys are free to explore activities usually associated with girls they will be punished by the world around them. The author shows clearly that to help parents navigate childrearing, we have to change the world around them. A good read, perfect for the undergraduate classroom, and clear enough even to give to those new parents in your family or the neighborhood."--Cover.

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