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The white colonisers of Australia suffered from Alliumphobia, a fear of garlic. Local cooks didn’t touch the stuff and it took centuries for that fear to lift. This food history of Australia shows we held onto British assumptions about produce and cooking for a long time and these fed our views on racial hierarchies and our place in the world. Before Garlic we had meat and potatoes; After Garlic what we ate got much more interesting. But has a national cuisine emerged? What is Australian food culture? Renowned food writer John Newton visits haute cuisine or fine dining restaurants, the cafes and mid-range restaurants, and heads home to the dinner tables as he samples what everyday people have cooked and eaten over centuries. His observations and recipes old and new, show what has changed and what hasn’t changed as much as we might think even though our chefs are hailed as some of the best in the world.
Native produce business is booming and it's about to enter a new phase--Australian native ingredients are beginning to turn up in growers' markets and even local supermarkets. From Warrigal greens and saltbush, to kangaroo and yabbies--John Newton will inspire you to grab some and take it home. This short companion book to the award-winning The Oldest Foods on Earth shows you how to cook with Australian ingredients, where to find them, and how to grow them. Organised by ingredient, each chapter includes a brief history, a practical guide, and recipes for you to make in your very own kitchen. It promises to broaden Australians' culinary horizons in every way.
The farmers of Paradise County have been leading a hardscrabble life unchanged for generations. The Communist government has encouraged them to plant garlic, but selling the crop is not as simple as they believed. Warehouses fill up, taxes skyrocket, and government officials maltreat even those who have traveled for days to sell their harvest. A surplus on the garlic market ensues, and the farmers must watch in horror as their crops wither and rot in the fields. Families are destroyed by the random imprisonment of young and old for supposed crimes against the state. The prisoners languish in horrifying conditions in their cells, with only their strength of character and thoughts of their loved ones to save them from madness. Meanwhile, a blind minstrel incites the masses to take the law into their own hands, and a riot of apocalyptic proportions follows with savage and unforgettable consequences. The Garlic Ballads is a powerful vision of life under the heel of an inflexible and uncaring government. It is also a delicate story of love between man and woman, father and child, friend and friend—and the struggle to maintain that love despite overwhelming obstacles.
The ultimate myth-busting collection of quirky and curious facts about your body and health In 2009, Drs. Aaron E. Carroll and Rachel C. Vreeman explored a wide range of myths and misconceptions about our bodies and health in the media sensation, Don't Swallow Your Gum!, featured on The Dr. Oz Show, CNN, and in The New York Times, USA Today, and more. Now, they're delving into a whole new collection of myths based on the latest scientific research, including: • Eggs give you high cholesterol. • You should stretch before you exercise. • Kids in day care catch more colds. • Sit-ups or crunches will flatten your stomach. • A glass of warm milk will put you to sleep. With a perfect balance of authoritative research and breezy humor, Don't Cross Your Eyes . . . They'll Get Stuck That Way! exposes the truth behind all of the things you thought you knew about your health, your well-being, and how the body works.
The story of a feast two years in the making, from the farmer who harvested the vegetables, raised the animals, and prepared the meal. In Growing a Farmer, Kurt Timmermeister recounted the toil and joy of wrestling an empty plot of land on Vashon Island, Washington, into a dairy farm. Now he tells the story of a feast made from only what the farm provides. But the story of the meal begins two years earlier with the birth of a calf, Alice. When she is grown, Alice will produce the cream to be churned into butter, made into sauce Béarnaise, and served alongside poached eggs and kale gathered the morning of the feast. Along the way we meet Leda, who trades onion seedlings for Kurt’s cheese; Michiko, who forages the white chanterelles for the antipasti course; and Bill, whose large, thin-skinned tomatoes will form the basis of the tomato upside-down cake. Rich in detail, resonant in story, Growing a Feast depicts the effort behind every meal, the farm that comes before every table.
Offering a panoramic view of the history and culture of food and drink in America with fascinating entries on everything from the smell of asparagus to the history of White Castle, and the origin of Bloody Marys to jambalaya, the Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink provides a concise, authoritative, and exuberant look at this modern American obsession. Ideal for the food scholar and food enthusiast alike, it is equally appetizing for anyone fascinated by Americana, capturing our culture and history through what we love most--food! Building on the highly praised and deliciously browseable two-volume compendium the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, this new work serves up everything you could ever want to know about American consumables and their impact on popular culture and the culinary world. Within its pages for example, we learn that Lifesavers candy owes its success to the canny marketing idea of placing the original flavor, mint, next to cash registers at bars. Patrons who bought them to mask the smell of alcohol on their breath before heading home soon found they were just as tasty sober and the company began producing other flavors. Edited by Andrew Smith, a writer and lecturer on culinary history, the Companion serves up more than just trivia however, including hundreds of entries on fast food, celebrity chefs, fish, sandwiches, regional and ethnic cuisine, food science, and historical food traditions. It also dispels a few commonly held myths. Veganism, isn't simply the practice of a few "hippies," but is in fact wide-spread among elite athletic circles. Many of the top competitors in the Ironman and Ultramarathon events go even further, avoiding all animal products by following a strictly vegan diet. Anyone hungering to know what our nation has been cooking and eating for the last three centuries should own the Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink.
Allotment Gardening For Dummies is a lively, hands-on guide to getting the most out of your allotment. Whether you're interested in eating fresh, saving money, getting exercise or enjoying wholesome family fun, this is the guide for you. The step-by-step advice takes you through all the stages in the process, from securing an allotment and preparing your plot, to choosing what to grow and enjoying the benefits of abundant fresh food and a sociable and healthy hobby. With over 50 handy line drawings, plus information on how to grow organic and advice on storing and cooking the food you grow, this guide really does have it all! Allotment Gardening For Dummies includes: Part 1: Getting to Grips with Allotment Gardening Chapter 1: What Are Allotments All About? Chapter 2: Getting hold of an Allotment Chapter 3: Getting Started Part 2: Preparing for Allotment Success Chapter 4: Deciding What to Grow, When Chapter 5: Preparing Your Plot Chapter 6: Keeping Your Soil Healthy Chapter 7: Keeping Your Plants Healthy Chapter 8: Growing Organic Part 3: Growing a Few of Your Favourite Vegetables Chapter 9: Going Underground Chapter 10: The Staples Chapter 11: Growing Leafy Greens Chapter 12: Planting Peas, Beans and Other Pods Chapter 13: Growing More Exotic Veg Part 4: Extending Your Allotment Repetoire Chapter 14: Growing Wholesome Herbs Chapter 15: Growing Fruitful Fruit Chapter 16: Nurturing Flowers on an Allotment Part 5: Getting the Most Out of Your Allotment Chapter 17: Involving Children Around the Allotment Chapter 18: Hobnobbing with Allotment Society Chapter 19: Growing Giant Veg Part 6: The Part of Tens Chapter Chapter 20: Ten Common Accidents and How to Prevent Them Chapter 21: Ten Ways to Revive a Flagging Allotment
A collection of stories and 100 sweet and savory French-inspired recipes from popular food blogger David Lebovitz, reflecting the way Parisians eat today and featuring lush photography taken around Paris and in David's Parisian kitchen. In 2004, David Lebovitz packed up his most treasured cookbooks, a well-worn cast-iron skillet, and his laptop and moved to Paris. In that time, the culinary culture of France has shifted as a new generation of chefs and home cooks—most notably in Paris—incorporates ingredients and techniques from around the world into traditional French dishes. In My Paris Kitchen, David remasters the classics, introduces lesser-known fare, and presents 100 sweet and savory recipes that reflect the way modern Parisians eat today. You’ll find Soupe à l’oignon, Cassoulet, Coq au vin, and Croque-monsieur, as well as Smoky barbecue-style pork, Lamb shank tagine, Dukkah-roasted cauliflower, Salt cod fritters with tartar sauce, and Wheat berry salad with radicchio, root vegetables, and pomegranate. And of course, there’s dessert: Warm chocolate cake with salted butter caramel sauce, Duck fat cookies, Bay leaf poundcake with orange glaze, French cheesecake...and the list goes on. David also shares stories told with his trademark wit and humor, and lush photography taken on location around Paris and in David’s kitchen reveals the quirks, trials, beauty, and joys of life in the culinary capital of the world.
About three things I was absolutely certain. First, Edwart was most likely my soul mate, maybe. Second, there was a vampire part of him–which I assumed was wildly out of his control–that wanted me dead. And third, I unconditionally, irrevocably, impenetrably, heterogeneously, gynecologically, and disreputably wished he had kissed me. And thus Belle Goose falls in love with the mysterious and sparkly Edwart Mullen in the Harvard Lampoon’s hilarious send-up of Twilight. Pale and klutzy, Belle arrives in Switchblade, Oregon looking for adventure, or at least an undead classmate. She soon discovers Edwart, a super-hot computer nerd with zero interest in girls. After witnessing a number of strange events–Edwart leaves his tater tots untouched at lunch! Edwart saves her from a flying snowball!–Belle has a dramatic revelation: Edwart is a vampire. But how can she convince Edwart to bite her and transform her into his eternal bride, especially when he seems to find girls so repulsive? Complete with romance, danger, insufficient parental guardianship, creepy stalker-like behavior, and a vampire prom, Nightlight is the uproarious tale of a vampire-obsessed girl, looking for love in all the wrong places. From the Trade Paperback edition.
According to Pauline Adema, you smell Gilroy, California, before you see it. In Garlic Capital of the World, the folklorist and culinary anthropologist examines the role of food and festivals in creating a place brand or marketable identity. The author scrutinizes how Gilroy, California, successfully transformed a negative association with the pungent bulb into a highly successful tourism and marketing campaign. This book explores how local initiatives led to an iconization of the humble product in Gilroy. The city, a well-established agricultural center and bedroom community south of San Francisco, rapidly built a place-brand identity based on its now-famous moniker, “Garlic Capital of the World.” To understand Gilroy's success in transforming a local crop into a tourist draw, Adema contrasts the development of this now-thriving festival with events surrounding the launch and demise of the PigFest in Coppell, Texas. Indeed, the Garlic Festival is so successful that the event is all that many people know about Gilroy. Adema explores the creation and subsequent selling of foodscapes or food-themed place identities. This seemingly ubiquitous practice is readily visible across the country at festivals celebrating edibles like tomatoes, peaches, spinach, and even cauliflower. Food, Adema contends, is an attractive focus for image makers charged with community building and place differentiation. Not only is it good to eat; food can be a palatable and marketable symbol for a town or region.
A born food-lover, raised in California on “the best Mexican food in the country” and her father’s “traditional Southern soul food,” Alicia C. Simpson couldn’t imagine giving up her favorite dishes to become vegan. Animal-free food might be healthier, but could it match the tastes of home—like fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, or a bowl of chili? Three years after Alicia took the vegan plunge, Quick and Easy Vegan Comfort Food answers that question with a resounding “yes!” Here is the essential cookbook for any of America’s more than 6 million vegans who miss the down-home tastes they remember (or want to try), or for vegetarians and even meat-eaters who want to add more plant-based foods to their diets, but don’t know where to start. Comfort-seeking cooks will find: Easy-to-prepare, animal-free versions of classics like Spicy Buffalo Bites, Ultimate Nachos, Baked Ziti and more 65 delicious combinations for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, with flavors from around the world, like “Chinese Take-In” or “Tijuana Torpedo” Everything you need to know to start your vegan pantry, and why being vegan is easier, less expensive, and more delicious than you might think. With spirit and style, Alicia shows just how easy—yes, and comforting—vegan food can be.
Fight cancer from the inside out Cancer treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation can be as hard on the body as the disease itself, and detailed nutritional advice is usually not part of the program. Yet eating the right foods can actually help lessen the strength of some of the most powerful symptoms of cancer and the side effects of treatment, allowing the patient to better fight the disease. Now, Cancer Nutrition & Recipes For Dummies is your trusted, informative guide to fighting cancer from the inside out. Designed for cancer patients and their families, Cancer Nutrition & Recipes For Dummies focuses on foods best tolerated during—and that can ease side effects of—cancer treatment. It also offers advice for menu planning, nutritional analysis, diabetic exchanges, and much more. Serves as a guide for cancer nutrition before, during, and after treatment Gives you a wealth of easy, immediate steps to speed up the healing process through diet Offers advice on treatment as well as solutions to common side effects like dehydration, fatigue, and nausea Enables cancer patients to put their strongest foot forward when starting treatment Cancer Nutrition & Recipes For Dummies targets those dealing with cancer and the loved ones who take care of them, aiding both parties in alleviating some of the side effects of the cancer treatment through change in diet.
"The Basic health publications user's guide series of pocket-size health guides tell you everything you need to know about foods, supplements, and the simple steps to follow for feeling better. [This book] even provides tips for talking with your doctor."--p. [4] of cover.
From the streets of Brooklyn and the horse trails of Saratoga Springs, Lew tells of the life he led as an Italian-American, becoming more aware of how his ethnic group with its values of family and hard work, made him into the successful man he became. Most autobiographies seek to find the meaning of one life as it passes through time, touched by the past, making sense of where this life began as it moves towards its destiny. Lew Elia's story has much more depth. Lew narrates his story to study how he and his ancestors became part of the fabric of American life. Lew Elia's story was to be a narrative for his children only; we should be very thankful that he shared his tale with all of us so that we, too could study the impact that Italian immigrants made on America's development. They put much more than the garlic in the melting pot.
When Reichl took over from the formidable and aloof Bryan Miller as the New York Times' restaurant reviewer, she promised to shake things up. And so she did. Gone were the days when only posh restaurants with European chefs were reviewed. Reichl, with a highly developed knowledge and love of Asian cuisine from her years as a West Coast food critic, began to review the small simple establishments that abound in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. Many loved it, the Establishment hated it, but her influence was significant. She brought a fresh writing style to her reviews and adopted a radical way of getting them. Amassing a wardrobe of wigs and costumes, she deliberately disguised herself so that she would not receive special treatment. As a result, she had a totally different dining experience as say, Miriam the Jewish mother than she did as Ruth Reichl the reviewer, and she wasn't afraid to write about it. The resulting reviews were hilarious and sobering, full of fascinating insights and delicious gossip. Garlic and Sapphires is a wildly entertaining chronicle of Reichl's New York Times years.
Embers life was routine, normal, stable Nothing out of the ordinary ever happened in her simple life. But Ember wanted more, she just didnt know what she was searching for until a boy on a black motorcycle rode into town. Challenging everything she knew. Will the secrets this boy holds so close destroy everything? Will Ember be able to forgive the secrets of those who were suppose love her the most?
Whether planning a quick dinner after work or a holiday meal for a crowd, you will never be stumped for a side dish again. Side dishes make the meal. Think about it: What’s a burger without fries, turkey without stuffing, or barbecue without coleslaw, baked beans, or macaroni and cheese—or all three? The Big Book of Sides contains more than 450 delicious recipes to complement any dish. Award-winning cooking teacher and author Rick Rodgers has carefully compiled a variety of wonderful options, from traditional to inspired, Americana to ethnic, Southern fare to California cuisine. Sections include “Eat Your Vegetables,” “From the Root Cellar,” “A Hill of Beans,” “Righteous Rice and Great Grains,” and “Pasta and Friends.” The Big Book of Sides shares • more than 100 information-packed entries on vegetables alone, from artichokes to zucchini, including root vegetables and grains • tutorials on the cooking techniques you need to know, such as grilling and deep-frying • at-a-glance charts for a variety of perfectly roasted vegetables and freshly cooked beans • carefree menu planning, with a complete list of special-occasion meals and suggested side dishes Home cooks of all levels will delight in preparing Roasted Summer Squash with Pepitas and Cilantro; Chard Puttanesca; Parsnip, Apple, and Bacon Hash; Smoked Gouda Mashed Potatoes; Quinoa with Carrot and Mint; Farro, Cherry, and Feta Salad; and Butternut Squash and Potato Gratin. Rodgers also shares recipes for relishes, chutneys, pickles, baked goods (from biscuits to foccacia), and even sauces. With helpful tips on how to stock your pantry, easy-to-follow cooking techniques, gorgeous color photos, and main dish pairing suggestions, The Big Book of Sides is sure to become a trusted staple in your kitchen.

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