Download Free The Glorious Revolution Seminar Studies In History Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online The Glorious Revolution Seminar Studies In History and write the review.

First published in 1983, John Miller's Glorious Revolution established itself as the standard introduction to the subject. It examines the dramatic events themselves and demonstrates the profound impact the Revolution had on subsequent British history. The Second Edition contains a fuller discussion of Scotland and Ireland, the growth of a fiscal-military state and the role of religion and the Revolution.
This book is the first full-length study of the development of Irish political print culture from the Glorious Revolution of 1688-9 to the advent of the Hanoverian succession in 1714. Based on extensive analysis of publications produced in Ireland during the period, including newspapers, sermons and pamphlet literature, this book demonstrates that print played a significant role in contributing to escalating tensions between tory and whig partisans in Ireland during this period. Indeed, by the end of Queen Anne’s reign the public were, for the first time in an Irish context, called upon in printed publications to make judgements about the behaviour of politicians and political parties and express their opinion in this regard at the polls. These new developments laid the groundwork for further expansion of the Irish press over the decades that followed.
Interdisciplinary interpretations of the Revolution and of the late Stuart and early Hanoverian world.
This monograph is an envisaging study of the ideologies of Thomas Gordon and John Trenchard. The work demonstrates that both writers were intimately identified with the Independent Whigs and vociferously denounced the absolutistic thinking and counterrevolutionary threats and activities of High Church Tories and Jacobites. The first two chapters detail the political and religious posture of High Church clergymen during the 1688-89 Revolution. The next three chapters offer vivid profiles of Gordon and Trenchard as being radical, court, and Harringtonian Whigs and assesses their roles as propagandists in early Hanoverian England. There are stimulating accounts concerning the personalities and collaborative efforts of these two men, the origins and functions of The Independent Whig and Cato's Letters, the responses of these writers to the political and religious policies of Walpole, and the repudiation by these Radical Whigs of the tyrannical and seditious behavior of Stuart sympathizers. In the conclusion, the author offers a review of significant points made in the study.

Best Books