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A pioneering urban farmer and MacArthur “Genius Award” winner points the way to building a new food system that can feed—and heal—broken communities. The son of a sharecropper, Will Allen had no intention of ever becoming a farmer himself. But after years in professional basketball and as an executive for Kentucky Fried Chicken and Procter & Gamble, Allen cashed in his retirement fund for a two-acre plot a half mile away from Milwaukee’s largest public housing project. The area was a food desert with only convenience stores and fast-food restaurants to serve the needs of local residents. In the face of financial challenges and daunting odds, Allen built the country’s preeminent urban farm—a food and educational center that now produces enough vegetables and fish year-round to feed thousands of people. Employing young people from the neighboring housing project and community, Growing Power has sought to prove that local food systems can help troubled youths, dismantle racism, create jobs, bring urban and rural communities closer together, and improve public health. Today, Allen’s organization helps develop community food systems across the country. An eco-classic in the making, The Good Food Revolution is the story of Will’s personal journey, the lives he has touched, and a grassroots movement that is changing the way our nation eats.
Good Food, Strong Communities shares ideas and stories about efforts to improve food security in large urban areas of the United States by strengthening community food systems. It draws on five years of collaboration between a research team composed of the University of Wisconsin, Growing Power, the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, and more than thirty organizations on the front lines of this work. Here, activists and scholars talk about what's working and what still needs to be done to ensure that everyone has access to readily available, affordable, appropriate, and acceptable food. This book helps readers understand how a food system functions and how individual and community initiatives can lessen the problems associated with an industrialized food system.--Back cover.
Creating Urban Agriculture Systems provides you with background, expertise, and inspiration for designing with urban agriculture. It shows you how to grow food in buildings and cities, operate growing systems, and integrate them with natural cycles and existing infrastructures. It teaches you the essential environmental inputs and operational strategies of urban farms, and inspires community and design tools for innovative operations and sustainable urban environments that produce fresh, local food. Over 70 projects and 16 in-depth case studies of productive, integrated systems, located in North America, Europe, and Asia ,are organized by their emphasis on nutrient, water, and energy management, farm operation, community integration and design approaches so that you can see innovative strategies in action. Interviews with leading architecture firms, including WORKac, Kiss + Cathcart, Weber Thompson, CJ Lim/Studio 8, and SOA Architectes, highlight the challenges and rewards you face when creating urban agriculture systems. Catalogs of growing and building systems, a glossary, bibliography, and abstracts will help you find information fast.
The new food revolution happening right where you live
Each week during the growing season, farmers’ markets offer up such delicious treasures as brandywine tomatoes, cosmic purple carrots, pink pearl apples, and chioggia beets—varieties of fruits and vegetables that are prized by home chefs and carefully stewarded by farmers from year to year. These are the heirlooms and the antiques of the food world, endowed with their own rich histories. While cooking techniques and flavor fads have changed from generation to generation, a Ribston Pippin apple today can taste just as flavorful as it did in the eighteenth century. But how does an apple become an antique and a tomato an heirloom? In Edible Memory, Jennifer A. Jordan examines the ways that people around the world have sought to identify and preserve old-fashioned varieties of produce. In doing so, Jordan shows that these fruits and vegetables offer a powerful emotional and physical connection to a shared genetic, cultural, and culinary past. Jordan begins with the heirloom tomato, inquiring into its botanical origins in South America and its culinary beginnings in Aztec cooking to show how the homely and homegrown tomato has since grown to be an object of wealth and taste, as well as a popular symbol of the farm-to-table and heritage foods movements. She shows how a shift in the 1940s away from open pollination resulted in a narrow range of hybrid tomato crops. But memory and the pursuit of flavor led to intense seed-saving efforts increasing in the 1970s, as local produce and seeds began to be recognized as living windows to the past. In the chapters that follow, Jordan combines lush description and thorough research as she investigates the long history of antique apples; changing tastes in turnips and related foods like kale and parsnips; the movement of vegetables and fruits around the globe in the wake of Columbus; and the poignant, perishable world of stone fruits and tropical fruit, in order to reveal the connections—the edible memories—these heirlooms offer for farmers, gardeners, chefs, diners, and home cooks. This deep culinary connection to the past influences not only the foods we grow and consume, but the ways we shape and imagine our farms, gardens, and local landscapes. From the farmers’ market to the seed bank to the neighborhood bistro, these foods offer essential keys not only to our past but also to the future of agriculture, the environment, and taste. By cultivating these edible memories, Jordan reveals, we can stay connected to a delicious heritage of historic flavors, and to the pleasures and possibilities for generations of feasts to come.
"This full-color guide offers a complete overview of edible landscapes from the planning, designing, and funding to the management and maintenance of these communal spaces and ecodestinations. Featuring case studies of innovative projects, it offers complete coverage of a dozen typologies including community gardens, CSA farms, edible estates, edible roof gardens, guerilla gardens, vertical wall gardens, and farm-to-table gardens, among others"--
The first guidebook of its kind for the Peach State, Farm Fresh Georgia leads food lovers, families, locals, and tourists on a lively tour of almost 400 farms and farm-related attractions, all open to the public and visited by travel writer Jodi Helmer. Here are irresistible opportunities to find farmers' markets, dine at a farm-to-table restaurant known for its chicken and waffles, buzz by an apiary, stay at an Arabian horse ranch and bed and breakfast, and visit an urban farm in Atlanta where kids build entrepreneurial skills. Organized by six state regions (Atlanta Metro, Upper Coastal Plain, Lower Coastal Plain, Piedmont, Appalachian, and Blue Ridge) and nine categories of attractions, the listings connect readers with Georgia's farms and reflect agritourism trends burgeoning in the South and the nation. Highlighting establishments that are independent and active in public education and sustainability, the book taps local food initiatives and celebrates the work of local farmers. Thirteen recipes gathered directly from farmers and chefs offer the farm-fresh tastes of Georgia.

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