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"Mark Hostetler takes an original approach to conserving resources in human-dominated landscapes. Taking into account multiple perspectives and written with an emphasis on the construction and post-construction phases, The Green Leap presents tangible ways to satisfy both human and natural resources needs."--Dr. David Drake, Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin "The Green Leap is one of the first books that brings together recent research on urban ecology and urban wildlife conservation, with emerging trends in sustainable development and green design. Hostetler's book is a welcome addition to the urban wildlife and conservation biology literature and will also be of interest to those interested in urban planning and green design."-Charles Nilon, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, University of Missouri
Gardens are extensions of our homes, places in which we get outside to relax, entertain, and get some physical exercise. But our gardens are also extensions of the natural world. Through our gardens, as well as other neighborhood greenspaces, we can help counter some of the woes faced by larger environments: rampant development, loss of plant and animal habitat, spread of invasive species, exploitation of natural resources, air and water pollution, and the impacts of global warming. Yes, even small urban backyard landscapes can combat such man-made strains on our local environment—and it’s easy to do! In his new book, The Northwest Garden Manifesto, scientist and gardener John J. Albers provides a comprehensive guide to encourage and enable homeowners to consider the local ecosystem in their own gardens, and in their larger communities. The ideas and concepts in this book reflect the most up-to-date thinking on urban ecology and how to best make our yards reflect the natural world around us. The key to Albers’s approach is for gardeners to first assess the current state of their property and then focus on the following key principles: 1. Protect, conserve, and create healthy soil 2. Maintain healthy plants and create a sustainable landscape 3. Conserve water and other natural resources 4. Protect water and air quality 5. Protect and enhance wildlife habitat 6. Conserve energy 7. Use sustainable methods and materials Through clear explanation, practical examples, and full-color photos, Albers shows how to evaluate any yard in terms of these principles and then challenges the reader to improve each element, one step at a time. From creating better soil to starting a compost pile, attracting pollinators to adding more native plants, or creating a simple circulating water feature to building a fence from recycled wood—gardeners will ultimately turn their backyards into beautiful, healthy, and happy habitat for all.
We are facing unprecedented environmental challenges, including global climate change, large-scale industrial development, rapidly increasing species extinction, ocean acidification, and deforestation – challenges that require new vocabularies and new ways to express grief and sorrow over the disappearance, degradation, and loss of nature. Seeking to redress the silence around ecologically based anxiety in academic and public domains, and to extend the concepts of sadness, anger, and loss, Mourning Nature creates a lexicon for the recognition and expression of emotions related to environmental degradation. Exploring the ways in which grief is experienced in numerous contexts, this groundbreaking collection draws on classical, philosophical, artistic, and poetic elements to explain environmental melancholia. Understanding that it is not just how we mourn but what we mourn that defines us, the authors introduce new perspectives on conservation, sustainability, and our relationships with nature. An ecological elegy for a time of climatic and environmental upheaval, Mourning Nature challenges readers to turn devastating events into an opportunity for positive change. Contributors include Glenn Albrecht (Murdoch University, retired); Jessica Marion Barr (Trent University); Sebastian Braun (University of North Dakota); Ashlee Cunsolo (Labrador Institute of Memorial University); Amanda Di Battista (York University); Franklin Ginn (University of Edinburgh); Bernie Krause (soundscape ecologist, author, and independent scholar); Lisa Kretz (University of Evansville); Karen Landman (University of Guelph); Patrick Lane (Poet); Andrew Mark (independent scholar); Nancy Menning (Ithaca College); John Charles Ryan (University of New England); Catriona Sandilands (York University); and Helen Whale (independent scholar).
Three decades of biodiversity governance has largely failed to stop the ongoing environmental crisis of global species loss. Yet that governance has resulted in undeniably important political outcomes. In Counting Species, Rafi Youatt argues that the understanding of global biodiversity has produced a distinct vision and politics of nature, one that is bound up with ideas about species, norms of efficiency, and apolitical forms of technical management. Since its inception in the 1980s, biodiversity’s political power has also hinged on its affiliation with a series of political concepts. Biodiversity was initially articulated as a moral crime against the intrinsic value of all species. In the 1990s and early 2000s, biodiversity shifted toward an association with service provision in a globalizing world economy before attaching itself more recently to the discourses of security and resilience. Even as species extinctions continue, biodiversity’s role in environmental governance has become increasingly abstract. Yet the power of global biodiversity is eventually always localized and material when it encounters nonhuman life. In these encounters, Youatt finds reasons for optimism, tracing some of the ways that nonhuman life has escaped human social means. Counting Species compellingly offers both a political account of global biodiversity and a unique approach to political agency across the human–nonhuman divide.
The rediscovery of the city that has been evident recently has by no means superseded the human desire for nature. On the contrary, the goal has been finding urban solutions that do justice to these growing needs and do so in ways that meet the requirements for design, ecology, sociology, and economy. This publication addresses the subject of designing inner-city spaces. It documents twenty recently realized examples in Europe, most of which feature greenery, designed by international landscape architects such as Gustafson Porter, Field Operations, Michel Desvigne, Gross.Max, Latz + Partner, and West 8. The projects, built between 2004 and 2010, range from private urban gardens by way of squares, streets, and promenades to large-scale projects such as the revitalization of riverside areas or master plans for the green spaces of entire cities. Urban greenery is an important contribution to ecological urban development. The projects documented offer examples of how this can succeed using the most modern materials and technologies.

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