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An accessible guide to the practice of conscious humming • Details conscious humming and breathing exercises from simple to advanced, including online access to examples of these practices • Examines the latest studies on sound, revealing how humming helps with stress levels, sleep, and blood pressure, increases lymphatic circulation, releases endorphins, creates new neural pathways in the brain, and boosts blood platelet production • Explores the spiritual use of humming, including its use as a sonic yoga technique and its role in many world traditions Humming is one of the simplest and yet most profound sounds we can make. If you have a voice and can speak, you can hum. Research has shown humming to be much more than a self-soothing sound: it affects us on a physical level, reducing stress, inducing calmness, and enhancing sleep as well as lowering heart rate and blood pressure and producing powerful neurochemicals such as oxytocin, the “love” hormone. In this guide to conscious humming, Jonathan and Andi Goldman show that you do not need to be a musician or singer to benefit from sound healing practices—all you need to do is hum. They provide conscious humming and breathing exercises from simple to advanced, complete with online examples, allowing you to experience the powerful vibratory resonance that humming can create and harness its healing benefits for body, mind, and spirit. They explore the science behind sound healing, revealing how self-created sounds can literally rearrange molecular structure and how humming not only helps with stress levels, sleep, and blood pressure but also increases lymphatic circulation and melatonin production, releases endorphins, creates new neural pathways in the brain, and releases nitric oxide, a neurotransmitter fundamental to health and well-being. The authors show how sound can act as a triggering mechanism for the manifestation of your conscious intentions. They also examine the spiritual use of humming, including its use as a sonic yoga technique and its role in many world traditions, such as the Om, Aum, or Hum of Hindu and Tibetan traditions. Providing a self-healing method accessible to all, the authors reveal that, even if you have no musical ability, we are all sound healers.
This book teaches the essentials of being a great session guitarist and also shows how to set up and use a home recording studio. Be prepared when you get that call for a session gig---know what to bring to the studio and what will be expected of you when you get there. Plus, learn to fill the bill from your very own customized home studio. This book is a must-read for any guitarist serious about doing studio work. 96 pages.
Several people have asked what motivated us to write a book about commut ing, something that we all do but over which we have very little control. As a matter of fact, the general reaction from professional colleagues and friends alike was first a sort of knowing smile followed by some story. Everyone has a story about a personal commuting experience. Whether it was a problem with a delayed bus, a late arrival, broken-down automobiles, hot trains or subways, during the past year we have heard it all. Many of these stories must be apocryphal because, if they were all true, it is amazing that anyone ever arrived at work on time, at home, or at some other destination. The interest for us likely stems from many factors that over the years have probably influenced our thinking. All of the authors studied and/or grew up in the New York City metropolitan area. For illustration, let's devote a few paragraphs to describing some of the senior author's (Koslowsky's) life experiences. As a young man in New York City, he was a constant user of the New York City subway system. The whole network was and still is quite impressive. For a relatively small sum, one can spend the whole day and night in an underground world (growing up in New York often makes one think that the whole world is contained in its five boroughs).
Psychiatric classifications created in one culture may not be as universal as we assume, and it is difficult to determine the validity of a classification even in the culture in which it was created. Culture and Panic Disorder explores how the psychiatric classification of panic disorder first emerged, how medical theories of this disorder have shifted through time, and whether or not panic disorder can actually be diagnosed across cultures. In this breakthrough volume a distinguished group of medical and psychological anthropologists, psychiatrists, psychologists, and historians of science provide ethnographic insights as they investigate the presentation and generation of panic disorder in various cultures. The first available work with a focus on the historical and cross-cultural aspects of panic disorders, this book presents a fresh opportunity to reevaluate Western theories of panic that were formerly taken for granted.
Aidan is poised to take his monastic vows—until a girl enters the abbey, one who hums of the number eleven. Aidan has the ability to hear the humming of numbers, a buzzing energy given off by living things. He is captivated and tormented by the mysterious girl, Lana, who has some unusual abilities of her own. How can he become a monk when his mind is filled with impure thoughts? Before he can begin to sort his feelings out, the Vikings raid. Only Aidan and Lana can save the village from certain, violent death—and only if they learn to trust in their mysterious talents. Joni Sensel's richly imagined new novel is a compelling blend of fantasy and adventure. The Humming of Numbers is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.
"The history of mentalities is at once a history of imaginable and unimaginable things in the world, of the speakable and unspeakable in culture, and of the conceivable and inconceivable in human experience. Beginning with an exploration of how we can understand a nonliterate Yaqui Indian myth called "The Humming Tree," Norman Simms scrutinizes a variety of documents and events to test and demonstrate the theory and methodology of a history of mentalities. He discusses American Indian myths, English novels, and Hebrew prayers and examines topics such as how storytellers perform their craft, what happened in Jonestown, Guyana, and who took part in the conquest of America." "At the same time, Simms provides a critical appreciation of incisive thinkers including Lucien Goldmann, Norbert Elias, Meir Sternberg, and Vladimir Propp, finding their writings more concrete and historically dynamic than those of the deconstructionists and poststructuralists." "By combining the interpretive techniques of literary and cultural criticism with the more analytic methods of the social sciences, Simms attempts to come to grips with all aspects of the meaningful in human society, which he terms the "text," especially what is meaningful but not recognizable as such. His primary goal is to identify the meaningful material the text cannot recognize: what it cannot imagine, articulate, or grasp in thought. Simms identifies this "black hole" of consciousness, the "nontext," as what causes a mentality to change its fundamental character, rather than to grow or develop."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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