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Silat Seni Gayong is an art of self-defense, a fighting art but one that also emphasizes the development of the self, becoming a better person, and serving humanity. Sometimes compared to a tiger ready to devour its prey, Gayong helps practitioners develop and increase physical fitness, flexibility, mental conditioning, and self-confidence. Author Sheikh Shamsuddin, who has studied Gayong for 25 years, introduces this little-known practice to Western readers in this first book on the subject in English. The most comprehensive study in any language on Gayong and its customs, The Malay Art of Self-Defense explores in depth the system, techniques, crucial elements, and philosophies involved. Also covered are the art’s history, profiles of the most notable practitioners, and an informative Q&A collected from various martial art practitioners to expand readers’ knowledge and appreciation. Included are photos of Gayong demonstrations, traditional training centers, customs, and events.
This is the first in-depth study of the Malay martial art, silat, and the first ethnographic account of the Haqqani Islamic Sufi Order. Drawing on 12 years of research and practice, the author provides a major contribution to the study of Malay culture.
I really applaud your efforts. It s really diffi cult to do a book like that. - WAZIR Thanks again for your immense work, my family and I are indeed extremely grateful. - AZLAN Your effort in writing about the early Muslim doctors is very commendable and would be good for present and future generations to read about. - TAHIR You are doing valuable work by fi lling in the gaps in our history. I wish more of our retirees would impart their memories to repositories of knowledge such as the USM. - TAWFIK
In the last few years there has been a great revival of interest in culture-bound psychiatric syndromes. A spate of new papers has been published on well known and less familiar syndromes, and there have been a number of attempts to put some order into the field of inquiry. In a review of the literature on culture-bound syndromes up to 1969 Yap made certain suggestions for organizing thinking about them which for the most part have not received general acceptance (see Carr, this volume, p. 199). Through the seventies new descriptive and conceptual work was scarce, but in the last few years books and papers discussing the field were authored or edited by Tseng and McDermott (1981), AI-Issa (1982), Friedman and Faguet (1982) and Murphy (1982). In 1983 Favazza summarized his understanding of the state of current thinking for the fourth edition of the Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, and a symposium on culture-bound syndromes was organized by Kenny for the Eighth International Congress of Anthropology and Ethnology. The strong est impression to emerge from all this recent work is that there is no substantive consensus, and that the very concept, "culture-bound syndrome" could well use some serious reconsideration. As the role of culture-specific beliefs and prac tices in all affliction has come to be increasingly recognized it has become less and less clear what sets the culture-bound syndromes apart.
The definitive guide to place names in Singapore. Place names tell us much about a country – its history, its landscape, its people, its aspirations, its self-image. The study of place names, ‘toponymics’, unlocks the myriad interlocking stories that are encoded in every street and landmark. In Singapore, the coexistence of various races, cultures and languages, as well as its history of colonisation, immigration and nationalism, have given rise to a complex tapestry of place names. Alkaff Quay, Coleman Bridge, Ann Siang Hill, Bukit Merah – how did these places get their names? Nee Soon or Yishun? Serangoon Road or Tekka? First published in 2003 as Toponymics, this updated and expanded edition of the book incorporates a wealth of new findings, from archival research and interviews, and sets out to answer these questions – and any question that might be asked about the origin, meaning or significance of place names in Singapore
This 1999 book is one of most important contributions to the history of decolonisation to appear in the past generation.
Commencing in the capital of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, the obvious jump-off point for any visitor to the country, the book is sectioned into the provinces, each of which is carefully explored, not only selecting a variety of hotels and resorts ranging from five-star to budget, but noting the attractions and area around them. Not only does each double-facing page show a picture of the hotel, but with it is a full description that allows ones mind to not only see it but gain a feel of the place.

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