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"Tracing what the library has meant since its beginning, examining how its significance has shifted, and pondering its importance in the twenty-first century, significant contributors--including the librarian of the Congress and the former executive director of the HathiTrust--present a cultural history of the library"--Dust jacket flap.
Now available for the first time in print, the dictionary is the most comprehensive and reliable English-language resource for terminology used in all types of libraries. With more than 4,000 terms and cross-references (last updated January, 2003), the dictionary's content has been carefully selected and includes terms from publishing, printing, literature, and computer science where, in the author's judgment, they are relevant to both library professionals and laypersons.
Inspired by the process of creating a library for his 15th-century home near the Loire, in France, Manguel, the acclaimed writer on books and reading, has taken up the subject of libraries in this captivating meditation on their meaning and significance.
First published in 1993, this book presents a new process approach to library and information services. First published in 1993, this book presents a new process approach to library and information services. It gives a detailed description of the model of the information search process (ISP) and a framework for a process approach to library and information services. The author has completed substantial new work that expands the concepts and applications of the user-centered process approach presented in the first edition. Seeking Meaning was first published in 1993. It has since become a widely used professional resource and required reading in library and information science schools in the United States and abroad. This book offers essential knowledge for anyone providing library and information services. Library and information services for intellectual access--the interpretation of information and ideas within sources--and the process of seeking meaning are detailed. Presented is a theoretical framework for a process approach to library and information services, which was developed in a series of studies of the Information Search Process of users. The framework has helped to illuminate the user's perspective of information seeking, and has offered insights into pressing problems of seeking meaning in an overabundance of information. This second edition incorporates the original research and series of studies that underlie the model of the Information Search Process, including the articulation of an uncertainty principle for library and information services and the concept of a zone of intervention for implementing a process approach. New chapters reflect the authors' studies and ideas in the ten years since the previous publication. Also described are recent studies on the implementation of a process approach to library and information services in education; an investigation of these concepts in the workplace; and a treatment of systems and systems design. A summary of the conceptual perspective and the development of process-oriented services and systems that enable the constructive process of users seeking meaning, with recommendations for further research, make this important contribution an essential text to understand the seeking of meaning through information.
Examining the personal library and the making of self When writer Edith Wharton died in 1937, without any children, her library of more than five thousand volumes was divided and subsequently sold. Decades later, it was reassembled and returned to The Mount, her historic Massachusetts estate. What a Library Means to a Woman examines personal libraries as technologies of self-creation in modern America, focusing on Wharton and her remarkable collection of books. Sheila Liming explores the connection between libraries and self-making in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American culture, from the 1860s to the 1930s. She tells the story of Wharton’s library in concert with Wharton scholarship and treatises from this era concerning the wider fields of book history, material and print culture, and the histories (and pathologies) of collecting. Liming’s study blends literary and historical analysis while engaging with modern discussions about gender, inheritance, and hoarding. It offers a review of the many meanings of a library collection, while reading one specific collection in light of its owner’s literary celebrity. What a Library Means to a Woman was born from Liming’s ongoing work digitizing the Wharton library collection. It ultimately argues for a multifaceted understanding of authorship by linking Wharton’s literary persona to her library, which was, as she saw it, the site of her self-making.
Emphasizing the advantages of working together and exploring the future of library services in an online, socially connected world, this exciting book shows how all public library professionals can take advantage of our strongest community and information tool—the library catalogue. • An index of key concepts and terms • A foreword written by Barbara Tillett, chief of the Policy and Standards Division at the Library of Congress
This encyclopaedia of library and information science explores business information visualization. It offers guidance for research and practice to Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML).
Explore the ARL’s initiatives for identifying, formulating, and testing new criteria for evaluating academic libraries in the digital age! The proliferation of electronic information resources in the past decade has changed the ways in which research libraries evaluate their service and holdings. This collection of articles (thirteen of which previously appeared in ARL’s bimonthly newsletter/report on research issues and actions) examines new measures for library evaluation that are being developed by the Association of Research Libraries. It presents an overview of how the Association of Research Libraries’ “new measures” initiative developed, plus insightful reports on the details of the SERVQUAL, LibQUAL+, and E-metrics projects. Handy flow charts and tables make the information easily accessible and understandable. From the editor: “The profound changes in library management and collection development brought about by digital technology in the closing decade of the twentieth century have changed the way we think about libraries. If we were to ask librarians who have been in the profession for more than a decade how they evaluated a library, we probably would hear statistics about the number of volumes held and added annually, the number of serial subscriptions, how much money a library has to spend, and how many professionals are on staff. These are the traditional criteria by which libraries have been judged throughout much of the twentieth century. Newer librarians, however, especially those who entered the profession in the late 1980s and 1990s, use a different yardstick and frequently recite different statistics that include terms such as user satisfaction, spending on electronic resources and services, document delivery services, numbers of databases and electronic journals available, and services provided to distance learners.” In Evaluating the Twenty-First Century Library, you’ll find valuable information on: current performance measures for academic libraries the continuing search for accurate new performance measures the uses of learning outcomes assessment SERVQUAL, LibQUAL+, and the ARL LibQUAL+ Pilot Project the results of the 2000 Symposium on Measuring Library Service Quality the uses of E-metrics in assessing the academic networked environment and accurately measuring use, users, services, resources, and other factors an insightful discussion of the rise in spending on electronic information by research libraries
A Guide to Library Research in Music introduces the process and techniques for researching and writing about music. This informative textbook provides concrete examples of different types of writing, offering a thorough introduction to music literature. It clearly describes various information-searching techniques and library-based organizational systems and introduces the array of music resources available. Each chapter concludes with learning exercises to aid the students' concept application and skill development. Appendixes provide short cuts to specific topics in library organizational systems, including Library of Congress Subject Headings and Classification. The concluding bibliography provides a quick overview of music literature and resources, emphasizing electronic and print publications since 2000, but including standard references that all music researchers should know.
Pulls together research results from Scandinavian public library researchers on current public library issues, including how public libraries are facing and dealing with the various professional challenges of modern society. Contributors tackle topics as wide ranging as the challenges of serving a multi-cultural society, new library media and services, internet services and new trends in library management. This collection of articles also includes library history works focusing on the relationship between public library ideas and practices in the USA and the Scandinavian countries.
With today’s technology, anyone anywhere can access public library materials without leaving home or office—one simply logs on to the library’s website to be exposed to a wealth of information. But one of the concerns that arises is the lack of access for groups isolated by socioeconomic, geographical, or cultural factors. This problem is not a new one. For almost two centuries, public libraries and other organizations have been trying to bring library services to isolated populations. This book is a collection of fourteen essays examining the contributions of librarians, educators, and organizations in the United States who have endeavored to bring library services to groups that previously did not have access. There are three sections: Benevolent and Commercial Organizations, Government Supported Programs, and Innovative Outreach Services. The essays discuss reading materials for two centuries of rural Louisianians, shipboard libraries for the American Navy and merchant Marine, library outreach to prisoners, the Indiana Township Library Program, tribal libraries in the lower forty-eight states, open-air libraries, electronic outreach, and the use of radio in promoting the Municipal Reference Library of the City of New York, to name just a few of the essay topics.
Figures ; Acknowledgments ; Introduction ; Coaching Overview ; The Effective Coach ; Coaching Individuals ; Coaching Teams ; Coaching Leaders ; Coaching Managers ; Coaching and Organizational Effectiveness Selected Resources ; Index.
Libraries—public, school, and academic libraries—are ubiquitous cultural agencies. Yet how much do we know about the multiple ways that they serve and enrich our culture? These essays explore the role of the library in the life of the reader and the library as a place in the life of its users. Contributors are Thomas Augst, Ari Kelman, Elizabeth Jane Aikin, Ronald J. Zboray and Mary Saracino Zboray, Christine Pawley, Juris Dilevko and Lisa Gottlieb, Jean L. Preer, Jacalyn Eddy, Benjamin Hufbauer, and Emily B. Todd.
The library and information profession builds skills and expertise that cover a wide spectrum. These skills are often desirable in other fields and industries. Likewise, the skills we build before entering the library and information professions can help us as professionals. Skills to Make a Librarian looks at both sides of this equation through a collection of essays by current and former librarians and information professionals who make use of this wide range of cross disciplinary skills. Chapters written by authors at various points in their careers detailing what skills they have developed outside of librarianship Chapter authors discuss skills that have benefited their practice and careers, and how the skills of librarianship fit into life outside libraries Authors open up about personal experiences while keeping it professional

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