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The literary career of Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) spanned less than twenty years, but no area of intellectual inquiry was left untouched by his iconoclastic genius. The philosopher who announced the death of God in The Gay Science (1882) and went on to challenge the Christian code of morality in Beyond Good and Evil (1886), grappled with the fundamental issues of the human condition in his own intense autobiography, Ecce Homo (1888). Most notorious of all, perhaps, his idea of the triumphantly transgressive übermann ('superman') is developed in the extreme, yet poetic words of Thus Spake Zarathustra (1883-92). Whether addressing conventional Western philosophy or breaking new ground, Nietzsche vastly extended the boundaries of nineteenth-century thought.
The Nietzsche Reader brings together in one volume substantial selections from the entire body of Nietzsche’s writings, together with illuminating commentary on Nietzsche’s life and importance, and introductions to his major works and philosophical ideas. • Includes selections from all the major texts, including The Birth of Tragedy, The Gay Science, Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, The Anti-Christ, and Ecce Homo • Offers new translations of key pieces from Nietzsche’s unpublished “Lenzer Heide” notebook • Provides a wealth of pedagogical features, such as editorial sections on Nietzsche’s life and importance, an opening introduction to his philosophical ideas, introductions to each major section, and a comprehensive guide to further reading
The Nietzsche Disappointment confronts Nietzsches recurrent, symptomatic struggles with causal accounts. His explanations of past and future reaise high hopes when they fail they are responsible for profound disappointment.
An introduction to literary theory unlike any other, Ten Lessons in Theory engages its readers with three fundamental premises. The first premise is that a genuinely productive understanding of theory depends upon a considerably more sustained encounter with the foundational writings of Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud than any reader is likely to get from the introductions to theory that are currently available. The second premise involves what Fredric Jameson describes as "the conviction that of all the writing called theoretical, Lacan's is the richest." Entertaining this conviction, the book pays more (and more careful) attention to the richness of Lacan's writing than does any other introduction to literary theory. The third and most distinctive premise of the book is that literary theory isn't simply theory "about" literature, but that theory fundamentally is literature, after all. Ten Lessons in Theory argues, and even demonstrates, that "theoretical writing" is nothing if not a specific genre of "creative writing," a particular way of engaging in the art of the sentence, the art of making sentences that make trouble sentences that make, or desire to make, radical changes in the very fabric of social reality. As its title indicates, the book proceeds in the form of ten "lessons," each based on an axiomatic sentence selected from the canon of theoretical writing. Each lesson works by creatively unpacking its featured sentence and exploring the sentence's conditions of possibility and most radical implications. In the course of exploring the conditions and consequences of these troubling sentences, the ten lessons work and play together to articulate the most basic assumptions and motivations supporting theoretical writing, from its earliest stirrings to its most current turbulences. Provided in each lesson is a working glossary: specific critical keywords are boldfaced on their first appearance and defined either in the text or in a footnote. But while each lesson constitutes a precise explication of the working terms and core tenets of theoretical writing, each also attempts to exemplify theory as a "practice of creativity" (Foucault) in itself.
This treatment is the first to comprehensively address the issue of where Nietzsche stands in relation to environment, and it will contribute to the 'greening' of Nietzsche. Using a philological method Del Caro reveals the ecumenical Nietzsche whose doctrines are strategies for responsible and creative partnership between humans and earth. The major doctrines are shown to be organically related to early writings linked to paganism, the quotidian, and the closest things of Human, All Too Human. Perspective is shifted from time to place in the eternal recurrence of the same, and from power to empowerment in The Will to Power.
"The publication of the revised edition of Kathleen Marie Higgins's Nicizscbe's Zarathustra is a great boon to Nietzsche scholars and Zarathustra specialists alike, for Higgins's consistently subtle analysis of Nietzsche's bold experiment in philosophical writing---especially her groundbreaking interpretation of Zamthustra, part IV---is replete with invaluable insights More than twenty years after its initial appearance, Nietzsche's Zarathustra remains an indispensable point of reference for philosophers and critics who take seriously Nietzsche's judgment that Zamthustra is his most significant work."---Robert Gooding-Williams, University of Chicago "This Spoke Zarathustra is Nietzsche's most popular and yet least comprehensible book Many have left the matter there, deriding both the author and his public. Kathleen Marie Higgins refuses to take this easy path. She reveals the complexities underlying the work's apparent lack of organization and argues that these complexities, far from being gratuicous, are telling and significant. She argues that Zarathustra breaks the boundaries that separate a number of genres from one another. Her own interpretation, reflecting the features of its subject, breaks the boundaries that separate a number of academic disciplines. Higgins has written an engaging book that will prove indispensable to Nietzsche's many readers."---Alexander Nehamas, University of Pennsylvania "Nietzsche thought that philosophy chairs would be offered for the best interpretations of This Spoke Zarathustra one hundred years after its publication. Professor Higgins's treatment of Nietzsche's thought, which most writers on Nietzsche ignore, neglect, deny, or don't even see." ---Joan Stambaugh. Hunter College With an interdisciplinary approach to Nietzsche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Kathleen Marie Higgins's Nietzsche's Zarathustra focuses on the philosophical function of its literary techniques and its fictional mode of presentation. Now appearing after twenty years as a revised edition, this valuable roadmap to Zaratbustra argues that the fictional format is essential to Nietzsche's philosophical message in his work. There is always a discrepancy between the living philosophical insight and any attempt to articulate it, and Nietzsche portrays the philosopher's task as an on-going balancing act in which folly is a means to further insight.
Nietzsche's critiques of traditional modes of thinking, valuing and living, as well as his radical proposals for new alternatives, have been vastly influential in a wide variety of areas, such that an understanding of his philosophy and its influence is important for grasping many aspects of contemporary thought and culture. However Nietzsche's thought is complex and elusive, and has been interpreted in many ways. Moreover, he has influenced starkly contrasting movements and schools of thought, from atheism to theology, from existentialism to poststructuralism, and from Nazism to feminism. This book charts Nietzsche's influence, both historically and thematically, across a variety of these contrasting disciplines and schools of interpretation. It provides both an accessible introduction to Nietzsche's thought and its impact and an overview of contemporary approaches to Nietzsche.

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