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For nearly forty years, Ronald Reagan’s vision—small government, lower taxes, and self-reliant individualism—has remained America’s dominant political ideology. The Democratic Party has offered no truly convincing competing vision. Instead, American liberalism has fallen under the spell of identity politics. Mark Lilla argues with acerbic wit that liberals, originally driven by a sincere desire to protect the most vulnerable Americans, have now unwittingly invested their energies in social movements rather than winning elections. This abandonment of political priorities has had dire consequences. But, with the Republican Party led by an unpredictable demagogue and in ideological disarray, Lilla believes liberals now have an opportunity to turn from the divisive politics of identity, and offer positive ideas for a shared future. A fiercely-argued, no-nonsense book, The Once and Future Liberal is essential reading for our momentous times.
An inspiring case for parliamentary democracy and a sympathetic exploration of current discontents.
Mead takes a broad look at past and present changes in the church, and postulates a future to which those changes are calling us. Denominations, once structured to deliver resources to far-off lands of foreign mission, now encounter the mission field in the layperson's workplace and the community surrounding the local congregation. Thus, the church is called to reinvention for this new mission frontier
Jurgen Herbst traces the debates, discussions, pronouncements and reports through which Americans have sought to clarify their conceptions of the goals and purposes of education beyond the common school. The Once and Future School argues that to make sense of the current trials of secondary educational system and to maintain any sense of direction and vision for its future, we need a clear understanding of its path in the past and of its setting in a multi-national world. From their beginnings in colonial America to the present day, Jurgen Herbst traces the debates, discussions, pronouncements and reports through which Americans have sought to hammer out and clarify their conceptions of the goals and purposes of education beyond the common school.
The Once and Future Woman L.O.V.H. Crowders 19916 Mizner Terrace Ashburn, Virginia 20147 (571) 223-2230 [email protected] We are introduced to a woman who has had a weekend tryst at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC. When she awakens, the man has left and the woman finds a handwritten note from him that devastates her. Feeling betrayed, and without thinking, she leaves the hotel in a hurry and is promptly mowed down in the street by a Harley. A handsome stranger stoops down to feel her pulse points to find out whether she is alive or dead, then fumbles through her pursr that has been wrenched from her grasp because of the accident. He is shocked to discover her identity. Moving to the toney suburbs of Washington, we meet the privileged Frances Bittle Adler and her handsome husband, Bill, a high-placed executive, and we meet their four childrenthree gorgeous girls and one handsome sonages 13 to 21. Frances, a college professor, is quite accomplished, and Bill seems to be the ideal husband. But, a malady that has plagued Fran for some time now comes to the fore and causes Bill to have to rush his wife to the hospital the morning after Christmas. We move back to the scene of the first womans accident and find that debris has been cleaned up and the handsome stranger has disappearedalong with the womans purse. At Washington General Hospital, we find that the woman has survived her ordeallargely because of the efforts of Dr. Pete Gregory, a handsome six-foot-six piece of manhood, who apprises her of her injuries and of what steps he will have to take in order to get her back to normalcy. Intermittently, the woman lapses into unconsciousness and has peculiar dreams. In another part of the same hospital, Frances is examined, and protests having to be admitted for tests, but Bill assures her that he and the kids will be fine without her. After a while, the two of them realize that the other bed in the room is occupied by a whizened old woman with grayish cat eyes, Hester Culpepper Rockefeller, who doesnt seem to know where she, who she is, or even what day it is. Francine Hacker, a very attractive, tall African American nurse, comes to attend to the old woman, Hester, who promptly repels her by calling her every name in the book, including the N word. Cut to 1944, and we are made aware of Hesters background and motivations for her behavior. Chapter XIII reveals a great deal about the life of the woman involved in the accident, especially about her relationship with her grandmother, Millie, and about the woman touched by miracles. In the ensuing chapters, we learn that Bill is not the man he seems to be. We are made privy to Francine Hackers enigmatic life. Now, because Hester has passed on, the two women, Fran and LaDeane, are made roommates and, thus, begin a relationship that will last for quite some time. They also get to know nurse Hacker extremely well. And, when LaDeane is released from the hospital, both Frances and Hacker petition to come and see her in her office. LaDeane wonders who will come to see her first as both Hacker and Frances are needy. Because Bill, a bi-coastal husband, has been offered a very powerful position with another corporation headquartered in Washington, DC, he prepares to move back East from Los Angeles where his old company is headquartered. Another chapter marks a special time in Bills life; now he gets to visit his new offices in a prestigious part of Northwest Washington, DC, and having familiarized himself with the layout and having made himself acquainted with those who will work for
We don’t understand the reactionary mind. As a result, argues Mark Lilla in this timely book, the ideas and passions that shape today’s political dramas are unintelligible to us. The reactionary is anything but a conservative. He is as radical and modern a figure as the revolutionary, someone shipwrecked in the rapidly changing present, and suffering from nostalgia for an idealized past and an apocalyptic fear that history is rushing toward catastrophe. And like the revolutionary his political engagements are motivated by highly developed ideas. Lilla begins with three twentieth-century philosophers—Franz Rosenzweig, Eric Voegelin, and Leo Strauss—who attributed the problems of modern society to a break in the history of ideas and promoted a return to earlier modes of thought. He then examines the enduring power of grand historical narratives of betrayal to shape political outlooks since the French Revolution, and shows how these narratives are employed in the writings of Europe’s right-wing cultural pessimists and Maoist neocommunists, American theoconservatives fantasizing about the harmony of medieval Catholic society and radical Islamists seeking to restore a vanished Muslim caliphate. The revolutionary spirit that inspired political movements across the world for two centuries may have died out. But the spirit of reaction that rose to meet it has survived and is proving just as formidable a historical force. We live in an age when the tragicomic nostalgia of Don Quixote for a lost golden age has been transformed into a potent and sometimes deadly weapon. Mark Lilla helps us to understand why.

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