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Ben stared at the images on the TV screen half in fascination, half in horror. He had never seen anything like this. It was incredible. It was awful. He needed answers . . . There are some things Ben doesn't understand, so his dad is sent in to explain the facts of life. But it's the other facts that are worrying Ben and he decides to find his own answers. He's deadly serious - and the results are very, very funny. The story of one boy's stand for a better world and a slightly better family.
If you had to give America a voice, it’s been said more than once, that voice would be Willie Nelson’s. For more than fifty years, he’s taken the stuff of his life-the good and the bad-and made from it a body of work that has become a permanent part of our musical heritage and kept us company through the good and the bad of our own lives. Long before he became famous as a performer, Willie Nelson was known as a songwriter, keeping his young family afloat by writing songs-like “Crazy”-that other people turned into hits. So it’s fitting, and cause for celebration, that he has finally set down in his own words, a book that does justice to his great gifts as a storyteller. In The Facts of Life, Willie Nelson reflects on what has mattered to him in life and what hasn’t. He also tells some great dirty jokes. The result is a book as wise and hilarious as its author. It’s not meant to be taken seriously as an instruction manual for living-but you could do a lot worse. From the Hardcover edition.
As Blair Warner on The Facts of Life, Lisa Whelchel matured from a snobby prep schooler to a responsible adult. Now the actress recounts the journey she's made in real life, from a shy, small-town girl in Texas to the glamorous life of fame and fortune in Hollywood -- and finally to suburban life as a pastor's wife and homeschooling mother of three. Poignant autobiographical stories reveal the developing trust in God that has enabled Lisa to grow in grace through seasons of pressure, pain, and prosperity. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Patricia Edgar has been named one of the ten most influential people in the development of Australian television production. Her candid memoir offers a rare behind-the-scenes look at the television industry and its politics. It also tells her own story-of how a young girl from Mildura became a leading innovator in Australian children's television production, and a voice to be reckoned with in a tough business. As a regulator and policy maker, Dr Edgar's take-no-prisoners style won her great fans and made her bitter enemies. Dr Edgar was the first woman appointed to the Australian Broadcasting Control Board. For ten years she fought for more locally produced, first-release children's drama on Australian television. In the early 1980s she helped establish the Australian Children's Television Foundation, creating some of the most celebrated television ever produced for Australian children, including the Round the Twist series, which sold into more than 100 countries. During her twenty-year tenure, the ACTF won multiple awards including a coveted Emmy and made co-productions with the BBC, Disney and Revcom. Along the way, Dr Edgar worked with a host of notable Australians, including Janet and Robert Holmes O Court, Bruce Gyngell, Hazel Hawke, Phillip Adams, Gulumbu Yunupingu and her brothers Galarrwuy and Mandawuy, Steve Vizard, Hilary McPhee and Paul Jennings. Bloodbath sets its author's triumphs and setbacks in the television industry into the wider perspective of political and economic change, the forces of consumerism and the global marketplace. This memoir reveals Dr Edgar as she really is-a sensitive, thoughtful, determined woman, still working to make the media environment one of quality not pap and a force for learning as well as entertainment. Bloodbath is a must-read for every Australian in the media industry, every parent raising a child, every woman who ever strove for career success, and anyone interested in how leadership works.
What place does consciousness have in the natural world? If we reject materialism, could there be a credible alternative? In one classic example, philosophers ask whether we can ever know what is it is like for bats to sense the world using sonar. It seems obvious to many that any amount of information about a bat's physical structure and information processing leaves us guessing about the central questions concerning the character of its experience. A Place for Consciousness begins with reflections on the existence of this gap. Is it just a psychological shortcoming in our merely human understanding of the physical world? Is it a trivial consequence of the simple fact that we just cannot be bats? Or does it mean there really are facts about consciousness over and above the physical facts? If so, what does consciousness do? Why does it exist? Rosenberg sorts out these problems, especially those centering on the causal role of consciousness. He introduces a new paradigm called Liberal Naturalism for thinking about what causation is, about the natural world, and about how to create a detailed model to go along with the new paradigm. Arguing that experience is part of the categorical foundations of causality, he shows that within this new paradigm there is a place for something essentially like consciousness in all its traditional mysterious respects. A striking feature of Liberal Naturalism is that its central tenets are motivated independently of the mind-body problem, by analyzing causation itself. Because of this approach, when consciousness shows up in the picture it is not introduced in an ad hoc way, and its most puzzling features can be explained from first principles. Ultimately, Rosenberg's final solution gives consciousness a causally important role without supposing either that it is physical or that it interacts with the physical.
Sophie Hartley, age ten, does not want to be a teenager. She vows she'll never be like her older sister, Nora, who has tantrums about her hair and almost everything else. Her older brother Thad is preoccupied with his girlfriend of the moment and doesn't seem to like the family anymore. No, Sophie likes being who she is right now, helping out at home, doing art projects, and hanging out with her two best friends. And another thing. Next year Sophie's class will see the movie about body changes, and her classmates are already buzzing about it. Sophie doesn't want to know about that embarrassing stuff yet. Does that mean she's immature? How can she prove otherwise? As usual, Sophie faces challenges and challengers with determination and resourcefulness. With the same down-to-earth, realistic, humorous take on friendships and family relationships praised in the three previous Sophie Hartley books, this fourth story brings the indomitable Sophie a step closer to growing up without compromising her sense of herself.

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