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As a fictional narrative with the purpose of pure entertainment, The Story of Richard Kanyarukiga, Campus 2000 introduces us to Richard Kanyarukiga, a maturing adult during a turbulent period of Uganda’s recent history. Kanyarukiga comes from Rutungo, a fictional area in Southwestern Uganda bordering Rwanda and Tanzania. His people, the Banyarutungo, have much in common with neighbouring Banyakitara and other people in Uganda, Rwanda, Tanzania, and the Congo. Kanyarukiga finds himself a refugee in neighbouring Tanzania, where he obtains employment as an assistant lecturer at the place where he previously attended as an undergraduate: The University of Dar-es-salaam. Kanyarukiga is a saved Christian of the balokole school. His family and others became balokole during the Great East African Revival of the 1930s, which started like wildfire in Gahini Rwanda and quickly spread throughout East Africa and to the rest of the world. The novel traces Kanyarukiga’s day-to-day activities, thoughts, and impressions as he lectures his students at the University. He eventually meets with Peace Ndizeye, a fellow Ugandan and student at the same university who is also a saved Christian of the balokole school. Kanyarukiga returns to Uganda and subsequently marries her. The story closes with Kanyarukiga as a newly-appointed ambassador. The Story of Richard Kanyarukiga, Campus 2000 succeeds in capturing an important moment in Uganda’s recent history, while still entertaining readers at the same time.
The central role that bureaucracy plays in the policy process is played by individuals, namely, by subject matter experts and managers we call political executives. The context in which these executives play their roles is defined by three key forces—the organizational environment of bureaucracy itself; our governing philosophy stressing responsiveness, respect for individual rights, and accountability; and the demands of the people and the institutions those people have created to govern themselves. This book provides an in-depth look at each of these forces, with chapters specifically devoted to how bureaucrats interpret their role in the policy process, how the organizational environment influences their ability to play that role, and most of all, to the interactions between bureaucrats and the institutions of what we call the Constitutional government—the President, the Congress, and the Courts.
Designed for upper-level and professional courses, this text is a state-of-the-art introduction to the public policymaking process that gives equal attention to issues of policy implementation and public governance. It uses an innovative systems approach, integrating the activities, actors, tools, and techniques of policymaking, to provide a comprehensive framework for policy design and analysis. The book is practice-oriented, with a focus on the ways that policymakers at all levels employ the standard technologies of governance--authority, agency, program, rule, contract, and budget--to design policy outputs and achieve policy outcomes. Through extensive use of graphics, the text makes concepts easy to grasp for a generation of students accustomed to the visual presentation of ideas. Case studies illustrate the tools and techniques discussed, and key terms, questions for discussion, and suggested readings round out each chapter. Among the many emerging issues covered in this text that will be especially relevant for upper-level and professional programs and student-practitioners are: --program design --performance management --public contracting --policy networks --venue shopping --commercial and nonprofit sector participation in the policymaking process.
The fascinating Bolivian president Evo Morales is vying with the brash and provocative leader of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, to be the most influential figure in South American politics today. Since coming into office four years ago, Morales has been intensely critical of the United States, speaking out against the drug war at the United Nations and implementing socialist programs at home, including the nationalization of British Petroleum holdings and other foreign investments. And he has reached out to America's political enemies, including Cuba and Iran. Based on personal interviews and unprecedented access, Sivak traces the rise of Morales from his humble origins in a family of migrant workers to his youth as union organizer and explosion onto the national stage.
As America's leading expert on the Presidency and an adviser to presidents from Harry S Truman to Bill Clinton, Richard E. Neustadt was "the most penetrating analyst of power since Machiavelli," as Guardian of the Presidency makes clear. In this inspirational book, Neustadt's former colleagues and students celebrate the rich and diverse contributions he made to political and academic life in the United States and beyond. JFK confidant Ted Sorensen, the late historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Harrison Wellford, formerly of the Office of Management and Budget, and Matthew Dickinson focus on his role as a White House adviser. Newsweek's Jonathan Alter highlights Neustadt's ability to interpret the Presidency for the outside world. Fellow scholars Ernest May, Charles O. Jones, Harvey Fineberg, and Graham Allison analyze his legacy as an educator and founding director of Harvard's Institute of Politics. Anthony King (Britain at the Polls) and Eric Redman (The Dance of Legislation) discuss his work in the United Kingdom and Brazil. Former Vice President Al Gore offers an appreciation of Neustadt's influence on generations of students. The book concludes with Elizabeth Neustadt's personal reflections about her father.
Beyond Persuasion is the first systematic, multi-administration study of presidential power and influence. Moving beyond Richard Neustadt’s Presidential Power, this book offers a model of presidential power that incorporates personal bargaining effectiveness with the structural imperative of efficient White House organization. Drawing upon a systematic analysis of presidents from Johnson to Reagan, Kerbel finds common patterns of organizational structure and bargaining behavior in their successful domestic policy initiatives. The path to power is detailed through comparative insights on the Carter and Reagan administrations, which prove to be remarkably similar in critical respects despite popular perceptions to the contrary. Kerbel then considers the relative importance of presidential behavior to contextual factors beyond the president’s control, offering insight into the way changes in economic and political conditions have hampered or improved recent presidential efforts, despite presidential attempts to organize and persuade. Analysis includes the first year of the Bush administration, and the possibilities for power in the contemporary presidency are discussed.

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