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Originally published in 1993, this classic piece of literature on adoption has revolutionised the way people think about adopted children. Nancy Verrier examines the life-long consequences of the 'primal wound' - the wound that is caused when a child is separated from its mother - for adopted people. Her argument is supported by thorough research in pre- and perinatal psychology, attachment, bonding and the effects of loss.
Argues that a primal wounding of the human spirit occurs in earliest human life that disrupts fundamental relationships and leads to anxiety, loneliness, and alienation; and shows how this wounding can be redeemed through therapy and through living one's life differently.
Although written with adopted children and adult adoptees in mind, Coming Home to Self is a book that can help anyone who has experienced an early childhood trauma or feels the need to re-examine their life and who they are. From understanding basic trauma and the neurological consequences of trauma to step by step methods of healing, Verrier's book will help readers discover their true self, take responsibility for that self and discover their personal spiritual path.
When Cicely Scott sets out to find her birthmother in rural New Hampshire, she uncovers a dark family saga of insanity and murder. Meanwhile, in San Francisco, Homicide Inspector Val Picard suspects Cicely may be responsible for the disappearance of a young preschool teacher. Lies and betrayal lead to additional murders. But who is at fault?
Adopted Women and Biological Fathers offers a critical and deconstructive challenge to the dominant notions of adoptive identity. The author explores adoptive women’s experiences of meeting their biological fathers and reflects on personal narratives to give an authoritative overview of both the field of adoption and the specific history of adoption reunion. This book takes as its focus the narratives of 14 adopted women, as well as the partly fictionalised story of the author and examines their experiences of birth father reunion in an attempt to dissect the ways in which we understand adoptive female subjectivity through a psychosocial lens. Opening a space for thinking about the role of the discursively neglected biological father, this book exposes the enigmatic dimensions of this figure and how telling the relational story of 'reconciliation' might be used to complicate wider categories of subjective completeness, belonging, and truth. This book attempts to subvert the culturally normative unifying system of the mother-child bond, and prompts the reader to think about what the biological father might represent and how his role in relation to adoptive female subjects may be understood. This book will be essential reading for those in critical psychology, gender studies, narrative work, sociology and psychosocial studies, as well as appealing to anyone interested in adoption issues and female subjectivity.
This book brings the wisdom of the ancient healing practice of shamanism together with the insights of contemporary psychology to provide an integrated approach to the treatment of traumatic symptoms.'Soulfulness' has two historic shamanic roots: Mayan and Native American psychology - a psychology of Self - as expressed in the many aspects of the Medicine Wheel, the wheel of health and wholeness; and the Shamanic Journey and Soul Retrieval, as practiced in traditional societies throughout the world, notably the Tungus tribes of Siberia. This book presents the ancient wisdom of shamanic theory and practice in a form which is fit for use within the mainstream of twenty-first century psychotherapeutic endeavour, including an extensive explanation of Shamanic Psychology and a practical description of the ceremonies of the Shamanic Journey and Soul Retrieval.
Unwillingly given up by her birth mother and adopted into a violent household, Jill Jolliffe found the course of her life set before she even had time to choose. She ran away as a teenager and has been running ever since. Jolliffe became a thorn in the establishment’s side and earned herself a hefty ASIO file. Following her instincts, she became a foreign correspondent – risking her life to report on Indonesia’s occupation of East Timor, exposing sex-trafficking rackets in Portugal and ducking bullets while covering a war in Angola. Over time she realises that the recurring pattern of her career has been reporting the stories of young women in distress, as though trying to free her younger self from the chains of being a ‘Forgotten Australian’. In the course of writing her memoir, an unexpected meeting with her birth mother takes her life full circle.
A passionate love affair between high school sweethearts creates an accidental pregnancy during a sultry night on the shore of Lake Michigan. Rebecca's unforgiving parents banish her to an unwed mother's home where she secretly gives birth to a baby girl. Her daughter Judy is placed in the loving care of foster parents before being callously given to Mario and Rosella Romano for adoption on her first birthday. Reoccurring visions and fantasies of her birthmother plague Judy's consciousness for three decades until a life-changing passage into adulthood causes her to question why she was abandoned. What begins as a simple investigation into her medical and ancestral history slowly evolves into a passionate quest to discover her roots. Through good timing, perseverance, and a few small miracles, Judy eventually solves the mystery of her origins. But will the woman she has been seeking welcome Judy back into her life? About the Authors Judith and Martin Land live in Colorado and Arizona. They told the entire story of Judith Land's adoption, from her birth through adulthood, to provide the reader with unique insights into the mind of an adoptee at various stages of her life.
How do we find ourselves again after the soul-shattering experience of surrendering a child to adoption? What does our journey toward healing mean for our families and loved ones, for society and most of all for our children and their adoptive family? Searching …, Carol Schaefer's sequel to her acclaimed memoir, The Other Mother: A Woman's Love for the Child She Gave Up for Adoption, not only takes the reader through the complex challenges of integrating her son and his adoptive family with her own over the twenty-seven years since their reunion, she also draws on extensive research as well as the stories of others to offer guidance and hope for creating enriching relationships after reunion. Woven within the narrative is Schaefer's remarkable creative journey from overcoming her fears of publicly telling her story, through the book's writing and publication, to the experience of the NBC movie version airing before an audience of 25 million viewers - thirty years after she was hidden away in a home for unwed mothers to conceal her “disgraceful” secret. "Carol Schaefer is a gifted and eloquent writer. Searching ... is one person's story, but it gives us a lens with which to see the complexity and challenges that adoption brings to everyone that it touches. This book should be required for all who live and work in the world of adoption." Dr. Joyce Maguire Pavao, Lecturer in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and Founder and Director of Riverside After Adoption Consulting and Training “Carol Schaefer's new book is wonderfully written and genuinely important. It is certainly about adoption, but it is much more than that; it transcends one person's journey to provide insights into the human experience.” Adam Pertman, Author of Adoption Nation and President of the Donaldson Adoption Institute"Searching ... is an exciting new book, and the title is appropriate on many levels. The author gives wonderful insight into the expectations and misunderstandings that derail reunions. Not only do we need to keep searching for ways to make reunions gratifying for everyone concerned, but we would also do well to follow Carol's example of finding meaning in what we do. I highly recommend this book to everyone in the adoption community and beyond."Nancy Verrier, MFT, Author of The Primal Wound and Coming Home to Self
Do you find that the cuddly, coddling type of self-help book either lulls you into a merely temporary state of well being, or makes you want to throw up? Then take on the bracing, no-nonsense approach: The Primal Shrug! No touchy-feely, milk-toast twaddle here! You will learn how to unload the excess baggage of unfruitful seriousness and fearful anticipation of what others will say and think, and get on with your own life, not just the world's idea of what you should be. Through many humorous yet useful examples, a series of situations that relate to almost everyone's everyday life, and some specific techniques that you can practice on your unwary friends, co-workers, and loved ones, you will learn to rise above the usual run of tedious life experience, and find fresh interest in things that you used to think weren't at all absurd -- until now. Apply the Primal Shrug to all aspects of the world around you, learn its very simple yet potent principles, and see what a facelift the world and everything in it will get!
Although criticism on the medieval and Renaissance dream abounds, a strange lacuna exists in the critical literature of dream in the English Romantics. Every major Romantic poet relied frequently and explicitly on dream imagery, and Romantic poems conduct a long discussion about the meaning, power, value, and provenance of dreams. Douglas B. Wilson's book traces the wide web of connections that the Romantics wove between dreams and other expressions of consciousness: sensation, emotions, illusions, creativity, personality, and memory. Situating his study of the Wordsworthian dream between ancient interpretation and Freudian interpretation, Wilson gains a new perspective on the oneiric moment of Romanticism while liberating it from a narrowly psychoanalytic reading. Wordsworth embodies virtually all of the dream theory of his time, thus making him the perfect object of Wilson's multiple approaches to dream activity as poetic creation. - Back cover.
Offers advice for adoptive parents on attachment and developmental issues arising from separation, loss, and trauma in early childhood.
A guide to conducting Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment to promote client growth Mental health professionals are increasingly enthusiastic about and ready to use psychological test data, research, and theory in life-relevant ways to improve diagnosis, client care, and treatment outcomes. With Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment (C/TA), clients participate actively with the assessor in exploring how their test scores and patterns reflect who they are in their daily lives and how they can learn to help themselves cope with life's challenges. Using a case study approach to demonstrate how to apply C/TA in practice, Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment provides practitioners with a variety of flexible and adaptable case examples featuring adults, children, adolescents, couples, and families from different backgrounds in need of treatment for assorted concerns. Designed for both experienced and novice clinicians, the book begins with a brief history of C/TA, and provides clear definitions of the distinctions among many common approaches. It uniquely presents: Eighteen diverse C/TA assessments covering: depression, multiple suicide attempts, severe abuse, dissociation, an adolescent psychiatric ward, custody evaluation, a couple in crisis, and collaborative neuropsychology Guidance on how both client and clinician can agree on the best course of action through joint exploration of assessment procedures, results, and implications Closely related approaches to psychological testing, including Individualized Assessment, Collaborative Assessment, Therapeutic Model of Assessment, Collaborative/Therapeutic Neuropsychological Assessment, and Rorschach-based psychotherapy Clearly labeled Teaching Points in each chapter Collaborative/Therapeutic Assessment provides psychologists in all areas of assessment, and at all levels of experience, with powerful C/TA examples that can dramatically illuminate and improve clients' lives.
She was found abandoned in the lavatory of a cafeteria in Bogota, Colombia. The police who picked her up named her Maria Consuelo. From a stack of would-be parents, Colombia’s welfare agency chose Valerie Kreutzer’s application, and the toddler quickly bonded with her new mom in Washington, DC. At school Maria struggled with severe learning disabilities despite a superior I.Q., but also blossomed into an award-winning young artist. Her impulsive behavior led to fits and false starts during adolescence, until she found happiness at twenty-one with David and his extended family. Their love and lives ended in the curve of a rural road in Florida. A Girl Named Maria chronicles an adopted daughter’s struggle with identity and her yearning for a birth family that may have included a twin brother. Maria’s legacy lives on in this poignant personal story of one mother’s unconditional love for her adopted daughter. “I loved this book! This story, although carrying the deep sorrow of a daughter’s death, will give parents of transnational adoptions a guideline for their own experience. This book is a much needed addition to the adoption literature.” Nancy Verrier, The Primal Wound; Coming Home to Self www.nancyverrier.com
Holly runs a dating agency. Up to now she's had no need of her own services, but, convinced her relationship with her fiancé Nick has staled, she turfs him out and determines to go in pursuit of hearts-and-flowers romance, true love and the soul-mate she has convinced herself must exist. In the meantime, to get back into practice, she accepts a date with the hugely eligible Stuart. Rich, arrogant and charming, he's not her type at all, but he's her guinea pig. But Stuart rather likes Holly. And he's used to getting his own way. Much to her dismay, Holly finds Stuart won't take no for an answer and suddenly things don't look so easy. Brimming with warmth, perception and understanding, Anna Maxted once again mixes the heart-breaking with the humorous to deliver a page-turning, laugh-out-loud, emotionally satisfying read.
“860 glittering pages” (Janet Maslin, The New York Times): The first volume of the full-scale astonishing life of one of our greatest screen actresses; her work, her world, her Hollywood through an American century. Frank Capra called her, “The greatest emotional actress the screen has yet known.” Now Victoria Wilson gives us the first volume of the rich, complex life of Barbara Stanwyck, an actress whose career in pictures spanned four decades beginning with the coming of sound (eighty-eight motion pictures) and lasted in television from its infancy in the 1950s through the 1980s. Here is Stanwyck revealed as the quintessential Brooklyn girl whose family was in fact of old New England stock…her years in New York as a dancer and Broadway star…her fraught marriage to Frank Fay, Broadway genius…the adoption of a son, embattled from the outset…her partnership with Zeppo Marx (the “unfunny Marx brother”) who altered the course of Stanwyck’s movie career and with her created one of the finest horse breeding farms in the west…her fairytale romance and marriage to the younger Robert Taylor, America’s most sought-after male star… Here is the shaping of her career through 1940 with many of Hollywood's most important directors, among them Frank Capra, “Wild Bill” William Wellman, George Stevens, John Ford, King Vidor, Cecil B. Demille, Preston Sturges, set against the times—the Depression, the New Deal, the rise of the unions, the advent of World War II and a fast-changing, coming-of-age motion picture industry. And at the heart of the book, Stanwyck herself—her strengths, her fears, her frailties, losses, and desires—how she made use of the darkness in her soul, transforming herself from shunned outsider into one of Hollywood’s most revered screen actresses. Fifteen years in the making—and written with full access to Stanwyck’s family, friends, colleagues and never-before-seen letters, journals, and photographs. Wilson’s one-of-a-kind biography—“large, thrilling, and sensitive” (Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Town & Country)—is an “epic Hollywood narrative” (USA TODAY), “so readable, and as direct as its subject” (The New York Times). With 274 photographs, many published for the first time.
Combining advocacy and memoir with social and cultural history, this book offers a comparative, cross-cultural survey of the whole history of adoption that is grounded in the author's personal experience.
Why do we behave so differently in different situations? Why did you choose the clothes you are wearing, the books you read and the friends and opinions you have? What is it about humans that has let us achieve so much, so quickly? This book tries to understand why the evolution of our human species is happening at a rate so much faster than may be explained by Darwinian biological evolution alone. The engine of our extraordinary social evolution is human behaviour. We have a deep-seated need to pass on to others some part of our own achievements, what we have made of our lives. Our survival and success now depends principally on our adaption to our social environment and not to our physical environment. It is these supercharged social genes that are the essence of our remarkable and accelerating rate of evolution today. This book looks critically at our present understanding of human behaviour and evolution to seek a consilience across a wide range of fields of research. More at www.supergenes.net
Psychosynthesis Counselling in Action is the definitive introduction to the principles and techniques of the approach. Demonstrating the need for people to find a more positive meaning to their lives, Diana Whitmore guides the reader through the four main stages of the counselling journey, explaining how the wide range of practical methods can be tailored to different client needs. This Fourth Edition includes: Three new chapters – a new case study chapter and two appendices on the application of psychosynthesis in the coaching field and in youth work. New content on positive psychology and the therapeutic relationship. Updated chapters on diagnosis and assessment and counselling process. Enhanced pedagogy and new case studies. It is vital reading for those seeking an introduction to psychosynthesis, as well as practitioners of other orientations who wish to incorporate this approach into their own therapeutic work. Lady Diana Whitmore, MAEd is Chief Executive and a founding Director of Teens and Toddlers UK.

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