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Important elements of games, movies, and other computer-generated content, shadows are crucial for enhancing realism and providing important visual cues. In recent years, there have been notable improvements in visual quality and speed, making high-quality realistic real-time shadows a reachable goal. Real-Time Shadows is a comprehensive guide to the theory and practice of real-time shadow techniques. It covers a large variety of different effects, including hard, soft, volumetric, and semi-transparent shadows. The book explains the basics as well as many advanced aspects related to the domain of shadow computation. It presents interactive solutions and practical details on shadow computation. The authors compare various algorithms for creating real-time shadows and illustrate how they are used in different situations. They explore the limitations and failure cases, advantages and disadvantages, and suitability of the algorithms in several applications. Source code, videos, tutorials, and more are available on the book’s website www.realtimeshadows.com.
The relationship between the architectural representation and its intended product - a building - has undergone a profound transformation over the centuries. Before the age of modern technology, the systematically predictive role of architectural drawing so taken for granted today was less dominant in the evolution from architectural idea to built work. The age of computer-aided design has brought with it a stricter standard of fidelity. However, contemporary architecture need not simply accept the inevitability of a technological imperative. This book demonstrates that representation is never a neutral tool or mere picture of a future building.
In this insightful book, which is a revisionist math history as well as a revisionist art history, Tony Robbin, well known for his innovative computer visualizations of hyperspace, investigates different models of the fourth dimension and how these are applied in art and physics. Robbin explores the distinction between the slicing, or Flatland, model and the projection, or shadow, model. He compares the history of these two models and their uses and misuses in popular discussions. Robbin breaks new ground with his original argument that Picasso used the projection model to invent cubism, and that Minkowski had four-dimensional projective geometry in mind when he structured special relativity. The discussion is brought to the present with an exposition of the projection model in the most creative ideas about space in contemporary mathematics such as twisters, quasicrystals, and quantum topology. Robbin clarifies these esoteric concepts with understandable drawings and diagrams. Robbin proposes that the powerful role of projective geometry in the development of current mathematical ideas has been long overlooked and that our attachment to the slicing model is essentially a conceptual block that hinders progress in understanding contemporary models of spacetime. He offers a fascinating review of how projective ideas are the source of some of today’s most exciting developments in art, math, physics, and computer visualization.
Published posthumously in 1845, Loudon's guide covers technical aspects of horticulture and agriculture to help cultivate knowledgeable and skilled practitioners.
Projected Shadows presents a new collection of essays exploring films from a psychoanalytic perspective, focusing specifically on the representation of loss in European cinema. This theme is discussed in its many aspects, including: loss of hope and innocence, of youth, of consciousness, of freedom and loss through death. Many other themes familiar to psychoanalytic discourse are explored in the process, such as: Establishment and resolution of Oedipal conflicts Representation of pathological characters on the screen Use of unconscious defence mechanisms The interplay of dreams, reality and fantasy Projected Shadows aims to deepen the ongoing constructive dialogue between psychoanalysis and film. Andrea Sabbadini has assembled a remarkable number of internationally renowned contributors, both academic film scholars and psychoanalysts from a variety of cultural backgrounds, who use an array of contemporary methodologies to apply psychoanalytic thinking to film. This original collection will appeal to anyone passionate about film, as well as professionals, academics and students interested in the relationship between psychoanalysis and the arts.
Scientific determinism, Tarot cards, Cinema, Music, Love, and Quantum Physics. The narrator negotiates love, murder, and war in this captivating philosophical journey. Pradhan is exceptional in showing the narrator's holistic approach to understanding. Quantum physics and love. A united theory of everything? It is an idealistic adolescent goal, and this is what makes Dancing with Shadows so interesting. This is a coming of age story of a young man in East Africa whose intuition tells him that these things are all connected. In his growing self-awareness and world weariness, he is obsessed with connecting the dots of his life in order to reveal some profound significance (i. e. the "music of God"). Who hasn't pondered such questions? How is my life unique or significant? How much more would life mean to me if I understood, say, the music of God...and what is the music of God? Although he is a young man continually preoccupied with sex and love, he is essentially a philosopher. He wants to understand things such as the life application of a quantum wave collapse or the difference between sex and love. This story is a Hamlet-esque self-portrait in his constant questioning. It echoes the uncertain and awkward, yet outwardly confident manner of Holden Caulfield. But above all, this story made me think of the kind quest for mystical self-importance that I recall from Joyce's narrator in "Araby."
From the Watching of Shadows: The Origins of Radiological Tomography presents the first complete history of body imaging by discrete sections, from its earliest beginnings around 1920 to modern times. Divided into two parts, the book is highly illustrated with many original figures from patents and some previously unpublished pictures. The first part covers classical tomography from 1920 to the 1960s, including the origins of radiological tomography. The second part takes a fresh look at computed transmission and emission tomography that includes recent developments by pioneering tomographers. Tables in each chapter summarize key historical landmarks. The book also includes an extensive glossary of technical terms and a comprehensive index. It is ideal reading for diagnostic radiologists and radiographers interested in the origins of their techniques, for practicing medical physicists, and for historians of medicine and science.

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