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The second edition of The Psychology of Language .
Breaking through the boundaries of traditional psycholinguistics texts, The Psychology of Language: An Integrated Approach, by David Ludden, takes an integrated, cross-cultural approach that weaves the latest developmental and neuroscience research into every chapter. Separate chapters on bilingualism and sign language and integrated coverage of the social aspects of language acquisition and language use provide a breadth of coverage not found in other texts. In addition, rich pedagogy in every chapter and an engaging conversational writing style help students understand the connections between core psycholinguistic material and findings from across the psychological sciences.
A comprehensive survey of classic and cutting edge research, this book shows how people comprehend, produce, and acquire language—and represents how powerful language processes are, and the importance of language in everyday life. It looks at emotional aspects of language processing in social contexts, and demonstrates not just “what language is” but also “what language does.” Chapter topics cover brain and language; speech perception; words and word recognition; sentence processing; speech production; writing and reading processes; figurative speech and thought; language development: phonology, lexicon, grammar, emergence, emotion, and embodiment; language and thought in a social context; applied psycholinguistics; and language delay and disorders. For anyone who uses language—and wants to understand its emotional implications in different social settings.
Written in a lively, accessible style, The Psychology of Language presents a compelling focus on the relationship between language and human cognition. Each chapter offers a strong central theme, presented as a hypothesis for the student to consider. The text's three-part organization (Linguistics, Cognition, and Neuroscience), reflecting Marr's three levels of analysis (computational, representational, and implementational), helps the reader relate the material to larger issues.
This accessibly written and pedagogically rich text delivers the most comprehensive examination of its subject, carefully drawing on the most up-to-date research and covering a breadth of the central topics including communication, language acquisition, language processing, language disorders, speech, writing, and development. This book also examines an array of other progressive areas in the field neglected in similar works such as bilingualism, sign language as well as comparative communication. Based on her globally-orientated research and academic expertise, author Shelia Kennison innovatively applies psycholinguistics to real-world examples through analysing the hetergenous traits of a wide variety of languages. With its engaging easy-to-understand prose, this text guides students gently and sequentially through an introduction to the subject. The book is designed for undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in psycholinguistics.
From the point of view of psychology and cognitive science, much of modern linguistics is too formal and mathematical to be of much use. The newly emerging approaches to language termed, "Functional and Cognitive Linguistics," however, are much less formally oriented. Instead, functional and cognitive approaches to language structure are typically couched in terms already familiar to cognitive scientists: perception, attention, conceptualization, meaning, symbols, categories, schemas, perspectives, discourse context, social interaction, and communicative goals. The account of human linguistic competence emerging from this new paradigm should be extremely useful to scientists studying how human beings (not formal devices) comprehend, produce, and acquire natural languages. The current volume brings together 10 of the most important linguists in cognitive and functional linguistics whose work is often not easily available to those outside the field. In original contributions, each of these scholars focuses on an important aspect of human linguistic competence, with a special eye to readers who are not professional linguists. Of special importance to all of the contributions are the cognitive and social interactional processes that constitute human linguistic communication. The book is of special interest to psychologists, cognitive scientists, psycholinguists, and developmental psycholinguists, in addition to linguists taking a more psychological approach to language.

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