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What happens when youve done all you know how to do, the paved paths end, and you still feel like youre missing something? The Second Half of the Mountain offers a practical and magical approach to recognizing and working with the deeper and often-confusing inner processes that happen after awakening. In this guidebook, McCall Erickson combines bits of personal story with the timeless building blocks of alchemy to outline the journey for the awakened traveler through the dark nights of the soul and beyond, not as the way, but as a guide to help you make your own way where it sometimes feels there is no way.
The Jayhānī tradition contains the most detailed description of the Hungarians in the 9th century. It is a reconstruction of the lost book from Arabic, Persian and Turkic copies. This study focuses on the historical interpretation of the Magyar chapter.
In Transylvania in the Second Half of the Thirteenth Century Tudor Salagean describes the rise of Regnum Transilvanum, a historical link between the early medieval regnum Erdewel of duke Gyula and the early modern Principality of Transylvania.
Forty one years ago, the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM) held its 1st International Congress in Lisbon, Portugal. In July 2007, the 11th ISRM Congress returned to Lisbon, where the Portuguese Geotechnical Society (SPG), the Portuguese National Group of the ISRM, hosted the meeting. The Second Half Century of Rock Mechanics comprises the proceedings of the 11th ISRM Congress, and reviews how the discipline of Rock Mechanics has evolved over the past half century to become an important area of Geotechnical Engineering, and considers new perspectives and developments as well. The organization of the congress was co-sponsored by the Spanish Society for Rock Mechanics (SMR), who also organized two satellite workshops in Madrid ("Underground Works under Special Conditions" and "Preservation of Natural Stone and Rock Weathering"). The Congress also included another satellite workshop in the Azores ("2nd International Workshop on Volcanic Rocks"), several short courses, a selection of one-day technical tours in Portugal and other events. The Second Half Century of Rock Mechanics contains the complete papers presented by the ISRM National Groups, as well as transcripts of special lectures by invited speakers on key issues and recent research developments. The themes of general interest included: Rock Engineering and Environmental Issues; The Path from Characterization to Modelling; Slopes, Foundations and Open Pit Mining; Tunnel, Caverns and Underground Mining; Earthquake Engineering and Rock Dynamics; Petroleum Engineering and Hydrocarbon Storage; and Safety Evaluation and Risk Management. The Second Half Century of Rock Mechanics will be of interest to professionals, engineers, and academics involved in rock mechanics, rock engineering, tunnelling, mining, earth quake engineering, rock dynamics and geotechnical engineering.
Your children are gone or leaving soon. It's time to focus once again on your own future and especially on your marriage. What's in store for the second half? David and Claudia Arp provide answers and practical help in this groundbreaking book. Drawing on their national survey of hundreds of "second-half" couples, the Arps reveal eight marital challenges every long-term marriage faces, and they offer strategies and exercises for meeting each of them. The Second Half of Marriage will challenge you to create a vision for the rest of your life together -- and inspire you to make that vision a reality.
Beginning with the disastrous events of the night before her fortieth birthday, in Second Half First Drusilla Modjeska looks back on the experiences of the past thirty years that have shaped her writing, her reading and the way she has lived. From a childhood in England, and her parents' difficult marriage, to her time as a young newlywed living with her husband in Papua New Guinea; arriving as a single woman in Sydney in the 1970s and building close friendships with writers such as Helen Garner, with whom she lived in the bookish 'house on the corner', and the lovers who would - sometimes briefly - derail her, to returning to Papua thirty years later to found a literacy program, this new book by Drusilla Modjeska is an intensely personal and moving account of an examined life. In asking the candid questions that so many of us face - about love and independence, the death of a partner, growing older, the bonds of friendship and family - Drusilla Modjeska reassesses parts of her life, her work, the importance to her of writers such as Virginia Woolf and Simone de Beauvoir, among many others. The result is a memoir that is at once intellectually provocative and deeply honest; the book that readers of Poppy, The Orchard and Stravinsky's Lunch have been waiting for.
The Adirondack Mountains at Saranac Lake, New York, were considered the ideal climate to cure Tuberculosis. The cold was beneficial and the pine-scented air that distinguished the region was believed to have special therapeutic value. The sick lay out on porches in patient hope or resigned despair and even those who were cured continued the practice, convinced it had delivered them and would prevent a relapse. The houses in town were a testimony to this belief, rows of porches across their fronts, each holding a bed. At the sanatorium, the sick were urged onto their porches, taught to lie prone and let the pure air help heal the lesions in their lungs. No image was more evocative than a bed on a porch. The author spent two years at Trudeau Sanatorium in Saranac Lake and was one of the last patients to undergo the lengthy treatment believed at that time to be the only way to cure Tuberculosis, the miracle drug, Isoniazid. For some the cure came too late. No longer was tuberculosis communicable; no longer were families and loved ones torn apart, but, for many the damage had already been done.
"Like a good coach at ‘halftime,’ Morley helps men evaluate their past mistakes and provides the kind of practical insights, encouragement, and inspiration that will help them ‘run to win’ the rest of the way--and reach their full potential in Christ."--Bill McCartney, founder & CEO, Promise Keepers"Morley’s analogy of the ‘midlife lake’ is worth the price of the book. He asks the right questions and rightly predicts that your ‘second half’ can be the most significant part of your life."--Bob Buford, author of HalftimeRefocus Your LifeThe first part of your life was like a river running swiftly within its banks. You were working hard to make your mark. You were intense. Focused.Then your river broadened into a lake. Now you find it hard to focus. Often, instead of feeling drive and purpose, you feel distracted--even insignificant.Patrick Morley shows how this season of perplexity can become a man’s golden opportunity to “reinvent” himself for life’s second half. If this sounds like you--or someone you know and love--this book is exactly what you’re looking for. Morley gives biblical insights, lived out in the crucible of his own life experience. This book will help you redefine your vision, your goals, and the heart that drives them. Second Wind for the Man in the Mirror will help you find a fresh sense of authenticity. Once again, you’ll feel your life regaining speed as the waters are gathered by the converging riverbanks just ahead.
A century ago Americans were still moving west, settling in new states, establishing themselves in new environments. That pattern was followed by the grandparents, then by the parents of Robert L. Pirtle, the author of this autobiography. The eventual home of the authors parents and his family was Roswell, New Mexico, a sleepy little town in southeastern New Mexico. To begin with, however, the book traces the authors lineage, even including fascinating familial connections to the compilation of the King James Version of the Bible, to the Cherokee Indian Tribe and to the Commander of the Alamo. Readers will certainly enjoy the picture the author draws of small town America in the 1930s and 1940s, of the vicissitudes of growing up, of junior and senior high school days and high jinks. The author displayed an interest in fairness and justice from his earliest days; indeed he proposes that every child has an inherent instinct for justice. As the author moved through childhood and school years he encountered numerous incidents in which the concept of fairness played a decisive part. Though such incidents of childhood are of minimal significance, yet they play a part in shaping a childs character and perception of the world, and can lead to incidents of real significance in adulthood. The author describes incidents which did just that in his own life. In one instance the author shamefacedly admits being the cause of a hurtful injustice to others; yet that incident, too, played its part in his maturation. It is said, after all, that good judgment comes from experience and experience comes from bad judgment. By the time the author graduated from high school his interest in science in mathematics rose to the forefront of his mind and he entered Purdue University with a four-year scholarship from the University. Before the year was out, however, he knew he did not want to pursue science as a career and he switched to the University of Arizona where he majored in mathematics, his easiest subject, while he sampled the liberal arts and pondered what his life work would be. He first considered entering the ministry and becoming a Methodist Preacher, but little by little he decided that he could prove of greater help to people and especially to the cause of justice as a lawyer. Accordingly, his last year in the undergraduate program was his first year in the law school of the University of Arizona. After graduating he took his commission as a 2nd lieutenant in the United States Air Force, working as a mathematician at the Special Weapons Center of Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The authors function was as target analyst, designing an atomic weapon delivery system for fighter aircraft. Fascinating is the authors description of his witnessing the explosion of an atomic bomb named Zucchini in Nevada in 1955. The author entered the University of Colorado upon completing his Air Force term and was hired by the largest law firm in Seattle, Holman, Mickelwait, Marion, Black & Perkins, upon his graduation from law school. During his brief Air Force career, The author had studied Shakespeare at the University of New Mexico, later entered into negotiations with the popular TV show The $64,000 Question, and was being scheduled to appear on the show after his graduation from law school. But the TV show collapsed after Charlie Van Doren, son of the internationally known Shakespeare scholar, Mark Van Doren, lied to a grand jury in New York concerning whether he had been fed answers when he appeared on the show. And a year or so of performing legal work for corporate clients discouraged the author to the point that he left the Firm and hung out his shingle as a sole practitioner, but simultaneously entered the graduate school of philosophy of the University of Washington, contemplating becoming a philosophy professor. In the end the author, d
On September 11, 1857, a band of Mormon militia, under a flag of truce, lured unarmed members of a party of emigrants from their fortified encampment and, with their Paiute allies, killed them. More than 120 men, women, and children perished in the slaughter. Massacre at Mountain Meadows offers the most thoroughly researched account of the massacre ever written. Drawn from documents previously not available to scholars and a careful re-reading of traditional sources, this gripping narrative offers fascinating new insight into why Mormons settlers in isolated southern Utah deceived the emigrant party with a promise of safety and then killed the adults and all but seventeen of the youngest children. The book sheds light on factors contributing to the tragic event, including the war hysteria that overcame the Mormons after President James Buchanan dispatched federal troops to Utah Territory to put down a supposed rebellion, the suspicion and conflicts that polarized the perpetrators and victims, and the reminders of attacks on Mormons in earlier settlements in Missouri and Illinois. It also analyzes the influence of Brigham Young's rhetoric and military strategy during the infamous "Utah War" and the role of local Mormon militia leaders in enticing Paiute Indians to join in the attack. Throughout the book, the authors paint finely drawn portraits of the key players in the drama, their backgrounds, personalities, and roles in the unfolding story of misunderstanding, misinformation, indecision, and personal vendettas. The Mountain Meadows Massacre stands as one of the darkest events in Mormon history. Neither a whitewash nor an expos?, Massacre at Mountain Meadows provides the clearest and most accurate account of a key event in American religious history.
In her compelling book, Ann C. Colley examines the shift away from the cult of the sublime that characterized the early part of the nineteenth century to the less reverential perspective from which the Victorians regarded mountain landscapes. And what a multifaceted perspective it was, as unprecedented numbers of the Victorian middle and professional classes took themselves off on mountaineering holidays so commonplace that the editors of Punch sarcastically reported that the route to the summit of Mont Blanc was to be carpeted. In Part One, Colley mines diaries and letters to interrogate how everyday tourists and climbers both responded to and undercut ideas about the sublime, showing how technological advances like the telescope transformed mountains into theatrical spaces where tourists thrilled to the sight of struggling climbers; almost inevitably, these distant performances were eventually reenacted at exhibitions and on the London stage. Colley's examination of the Alpine Club archives, periodicals, and other primary resources offers a more complicated and inclusive picture of female mountaineering as she documents the strong presence of women on successful expeditions in the latter half of the century. In Part Two, Colley turns to John Ruskin, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Robert Louis Stevenson, whose writings about the Alps reflect their feelings about their Romantic heritage and shed light on their ideas about perception, metaphor, and literary style. Colley concludes by offering insights into the ways in which expeditions to the Himalayas affected people's sense of the sublime, arguing that these individuals were motivated as much by the glory of Empire as by aesthetic sensibility. Her ambitious book is an astute exploration of nationalism, as well as theories of gender, spectacle, and the technicalities of glacial movement that were intruding on what before had seemed inviolable.
Much criticism has been directed at negative stereotypes of Appalachia perpetuated by movies, television shows, and news media. Books, on the other hand, often draw enthusiastic praise for their celebration of the simplicity and authenticity of the Appalachian region. Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878 employs the innovative new strategy of examining fan mail, reviews, and readers' geographic affiliations to understand how readers have imagined the region and what purposes these imagined geographies have served for them. As Emily Satterwhite traces the changing visions of Appalachia across the decades, from the Gilded Age (1865--1895) to the present, she finds that every generation has produced an audience hungry for a romantic version of Appalachia. According to Satterwhite, best-selling fiction has portrayed Appalachia as a distinctive place apart from the mainstream United States, has offered cosmopolitan white readers a sense of identity and community, and has engendered feelings of national and cultural pride. Thanks in part to readers' faith in authors as authentic representatives of the regions they write about, Satterwhite argues, regional fiction often plays a role in creating and affirming regional identity. By mapping the geographic locations of fans, Dear Appalachia demonstrates that mobile white readers in particular, including regional elites, have idealized Appalachia as rooted, static, and protected from commercial society in order to reassure themselves that there remains an "authentic" America untouched by global currents. Investigating texts such as John Fox Jr.'s The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (1908), Harriette Arnow's The Dollmaker (1954), James Dickey's Deliverance (1970), and Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain (1997), Dear Appalachia moves beyond traditional studies of regional fiction to document the functions of these narratives in the lives of readers, revealing not only what people have thought about Appalachia, but why.
'The authority of the contributors, the quality of production, and the bibliographic notes are first-rate. It is essential for basic earth science collections, and for any college library that supports geography or geology.'

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