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Presents the history of the English language from its obscure Anglo-Saxon origins to its present status as the world's most prominent and fast-growing international language.
With globalization, English has become an economic necessity and Indians have realized that they have the 'English advantage' over many other countries like China and Japan. India has shed its colonial complexes towards English and has come to terms with the language; Indians have separated the English language from the English. The Story of English in India presents historical facts in a socio-cultural framework. The book is a must for all teachers and students of English; it will be useful for all those interested in the politics of language and education in India. Key issues discussed: - Are we indebted to the British for introducing English in India? - What was the role of English during India's struggle for freedom? - Has English united India? - Has English divided India into two - the English knowing classes who govern and the non-English knowing masses who are governed? - Will English ever become an Indian tongue spoken in the great Indian language bazaar? - What will be the future of major Indian languages in the wake of the English onslaught? Will it end in linguistic imperialism and cultural colonialism?
Featuring Latinate and Celtic words, weasel words and nonce-words, ancient words ('loaf') to cutting edge ('twittersphere') and spanning the indispensable words that shape our tongue ('and', 'what') to the more fanciful ('fopdoodle'), Crystal takes us along the winding byways of language via the rude, the obscure and the downright surprising. In this unique new history of the world's most ubiquitous language, linguistics expert David Crystal draws on words that best illustrate the huge variety of sources, influences and events that have helped to shape our vernacular since the first definitively English word was written down in the fifth century ('roe', in case you are wondering).
This book surveys the evolution and development of English prose and poetry through the centuries: from Beowulf to Samuel Beckett's dramas.
Born as a Germanic tongue with the arrival in Britain of the Anglo-Saxons in the early medieval period, heavily influenced by Norman French from the 11th century, and finally emerging as modern English from the late Middle Ages, the English language has grown to become the linguistic equivalent of a superpower. Worldwide some 380 million people speak English as a first language and some 600 million as a second language. A staggering one billion people are believed to be learning it. English is the premier international language in communications, science, business, aviation, entertainment, and diplomacy, and also on the Internet and is thought by many to be well on the way to becoming the world's first universal language. Philip Gooden tells the story of the English language in all its richness and variety. From the intriguing origins and changing definitions of common words such as 'OK', 'beserk', 'curfew', 'cabal' and 'pow-wow', to the massive transformations wrought in the vocabulary and structure of the language by Anglo-Saxon and Norman conquest, through to the literary triumphs of Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales and the works of Shakespeare, right up to the profound and surprising effect electronic media, and in particular the Internet, has had on its development.
The author of the acclaimed The Lost Continent now steers us through the quirks and byways of the English language. We learn why island, freight, and colonel are spelled in such unphonetic ways, why four has a u in it but forty doesn't, plus bizarre and enlightening facts about some of the patriarchs of this peculiar language.
The English language arrived in Australia with the first motley bunch of European settlers on 26 January 1788. Today there is clearly a distinctive Australian regional dialect with its own place among the global family of ‘Englishes’. How did this come about? Where did the distinctive pattern, accent, and verbal inventions that make up Aussie English come from? A lively narrative, this book tells the story of the birth, rise and triumphant progress of the colourful dingo lingo that we know today as Aussie English.
The groundbreaking history of the English language, fusing chronological with anecdotal and etymological accounts of individual word-histories, to create not one story, but many stories. The English language is now accepted as the global lingua franca of the modern age, spoken or written in by over a quarter of the human race. But how did it evolve? How did a language spoken originally by a few thousand Anglo-Saxons become one used by more than 1,500 million? What developments can be seen as we move from Beowulf to Chaucer to Shakespeare to Dickens and the present day? A host of fascinating questions are answered in The Stories of English, a groundbreaking history of the language by David Crystal, the world-renowned writer and commentator on English. Many books have been written about English, but they have all focused on a single variety: the educated, printed language called “standard” English. David Crystal turns the history of English on its head and instead provides a startlingly original view of where the richness, creativity and diversity of the language truly lies—in the accents and dialects of nonstandard English users all over the world. Whatever their regional, social or ethnic background, each group has a story worth telling, whether it is in Scotland or Somerset, South Africa or Singapore. Interweaved within this central chronological story are accounts of uses of dialect around the world as well as in literary classics from The Canterbury Tales to The Lord of the Rings. For the first time, regional speech and writing is placed center stage, giving a sense of the social realities behind the development of English. This significant shift in perspective enables the reader to understand for the first time the importance of everyday, previously marginalized, voices in our language and provides an argument too for the way English should be taught in the future.
The verb be has a remarkable history, and a wider range of meanings, uses, and forms than any other English word. In this book, David Crystal explores the intriguing story of this verb over 26 chapters, each linked to a particular usage. Chapters explore, for instance, circumstantial be ('how are you?'), numerical be ('two and two is four'), quotative be ('so I was like, "wow"'), and ludic be ('oh no he isn't!'). The discussion is accompanied by examples from a whole host of sources, literary and otherwise, such as Beowulf, Jane Austen, pantomime, and Star Wars, and further illustrated by cartoons including several from late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century issues of Punch. Full of fascinating nuggets of information, this book will appeal to a broad audience of lovers of words and language.
I prepared this book to improve my own English. Then, When I started to work on the book - I will explain the way I work below - I found it very useful. Therefore, I published the book. if you want to improve your English. There's no harm in trying. You can work on 1, 2 or 3 stories per day. Depending on your free time. I worked on two stories per day. And of course the basic level of your English will lead to faster results. Operation: I. Write your chosen story on a piece of paper after the beginning. II. Underline the words you do not know, search for the meaning and write under it. III. Read the story aloud once. IV. Translate the story yourself without help. V. Check the translation of the story you are translating. with the help of a teacher or someone who knows. It may be difficult at first, but after working for at least a month, you will see the difference from your initial situation. ------- Bu kitabı kendi İngilizcemi geliştirmek için hazırladım. Sonra, kitap üzerinde çalışmaya başladığımda - aşağıdaki çalışma şeklimi açıklayacağım - çok faydalı buldum. Bu yüzden kitabı yayımladım. İngilizcenizi geliştirmek istiyorsanız. Denemenin zararı yok. Günde 1, 2 veya 3 hikaye üzerinde çalışabilirsiniz. Boş zamanlarına bağlı olarak. Ben günde iki hikaye üzerinde çalıştım. Ve elbette İngilizceniz temel seviyede olursa daha hızlı öğrenirsiniz. Çalışma Şeklim: I. Seçtiğiniz hikayeyi baştan sonra bir kağıda yazın. II. Bilmediğiniz kelimelerin altını çizin, anlamı arayın ve altına yazın. III. Hikayeyi bir kez sesli okuyun. IV. Hikayeyi yardımsız kendin tercüme edin. V. Tercüme ettiğiniz hikayenin çevirisini kontrol edin. Bir öğretmenin veya bilen birinin yardımıyla. İlk başta zor olabilir, ancak en az bir ay çalıştıktan sonra, ilk durumunuzdan farkı göreceksiniz.
In this book, David Crystal confronts the foe of many : grammar. Once taught relentlessly to all students in the English-speaking world, grammar disappeared from most school curricula, so terms such as "preposition" and "conjunction" now often confound children and adults alike. In this breezy, entertaining book, Crystal proves that grammar needn't make us uneasy--we can all make sense of how we make sense. -- Provided by publisher.
The Story of English illustrates the compelling history of how the relatively obscure dialects spoken by tribes from what are now Denmark, the Low Countries and northern Germany, became the most widely spoken language in the world, and of how that language evolved during the last two millennia. Chronologically ordered and divided into six main sections covering pre-Roman and Latin influences, the ascent of Old English, and the succession of Middle English, Early Modern and then Late Modern English to today's global language, this fascinating book also explores such factors as the history of the printing press, the works of Chaucer, the evolution of The American Dictionary of the English Language - commonly known as Webster's - and the magisterial Oxford English Dictionary, to the use of slang in today's speech and the coming of electronic messaging: language for a post-modern world.The Story of English is a great book for any lover not just of English, but of the history and development of language.
Describes how the English language developed into the language we speak today, and how it continues to evolve

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