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Albie Sachs gives an intimate account of his extraordinary life and work as a judge in South Africa. Mixing autobiography with reflections on his major cases and the role of law in achieving social justice, Sachs offers a rare glimpse into the workings of the judicial mind and a unique perspective on modern South African history.
Many critical theorists talk and write about the day after the revolution, but few have actually participated in the constitution of a revolutionary government. Emeritus Justice Albie Sachs was a freedom fighter for most of his life. He then played a major role in the negotiating committee for the new constitution of South Africa, and was subsequently appointed to the new Constitutional Court of South Africa. Therefore, the question of what it means to make the transition from a freedom fighter to a participant in a revolutionary government is not abstract, in Hegel’s sense of the word, it is an actual journey that Albie Sachs undertook. The essays in this book raise the complex question of what it actually means to make this transition without selling out to the demands of realism. In addition, the preface written by Emeritus Justice Albie Sachs and his interview with Drucilla Cornell and Karin van Marle, further address key questions about revolution in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries: from armed struggle to the organization of a nation state committed to ethical transformation in the name of justice. Albie Sachs and transformation in South Africa: from revolutionary activist to constitutional court judge illuminates the theoretical and practical experiences of revolution and its political aftermath. With first-hand accounts alongside academic interrogation, this unique book will intrigue anyone interested in the intersection of Law and Politics.
This book showcases eight judges that exemplify judicial greatness and looks at what role they play in law and society.
"A literate, informative, vivid, and most poignant account of what happens to a society when it officially insists on a legal order that systematically denies the overwhelming majority of its population the minimum requirements of justice."--Richard A. Falk, professor emeritus of international law at Princeton University
"The democratic moment" is, among other things, a look at the mass forces that swept Jacob Zuma to power in South Africa in 2009 and put an end to the elite politics of the Thabo Mbeki era. Trenchant and provocative, Xolela Mangcu looks at the new configuration of power in South Africa and in the process illuminates such topics as the new black elite, with particular attention to institutions such as the political opposition, the courts and the media. This is a book that will stimulate ideas, provoke discussion, create controversy and help to understand where South Africa stands as a society and a nation.
This volume of essays examines key cutting-edge areas of international refugee law, including strategies for interpretative harmony, the rights of refugees and the standard of proof in complementary protection. Each topic is examined from a theoretical and a practical perspective in order to find solutions to the many legal issues and concerns which currently confront this area of law, and to seek ways to advance the field as a whole.
Essential for students of Theatre Studies, this series of six decadal volumes provides a critical survey and reassessment of the theatre produced in each decade from the 1950s to the present. Each volume equips readers with an understanding of the context from which work emerged, a detailed overview of the range of theatrical activity and a close study of the work of four of the major playwrights by a team of leading scholars. Chris Megson's comprehensive survey of the theatre of the 1970s examines the work of four playwrights who came to promience in the decade and whose work remains undiminished today: Caryl Churchill (by Paola Botham), David Hare (Chris Megson), Howard Brenton (Richard Boon) and David Edgar (Janelle Reinelt). It analyses their work then, its legacy today and provides a fresh assessment of their contribution to British theatre. Interviews with the playwrights, with directors and with actors provides an invaluable collection of documents offering new perspectives on the work. Revisiting the decade from the perspective of the twenty-first century, Chris Megson provides an authoritative and stimulating reassessment of British playwriting in the 1970s.

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