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"This small, concise book on Chinese dietary therapy has been written specifically for lay readers. It is meant to replace two earlier book I have written on Chinese dietary therapy, Prince Wen Hui's Cook, and Arisal of the Clear."--Preface.
This book presents the principles of Chinese nutrition, including the energies and therapeutic properties of foods, methods of preparation, body type, season, and geographical location. Harmony and balance, the fundamental principles of universal existence, are also the basis of a healthy diet. The roots of Chinese knowledge about nutrition are at least 6,000 years old and produce time-tested results in terms of general health and longevity.
Discusses the philosophy of Tao and offers information on diet and nutrition, fasting, breathing exercises, physical exercises, acupuncture, massage, birth control, sex therapy, and meditation
Americans are bombarded with so many rationales and diets that many among us reflect a confusion of choices that has little to do with the actual experience of food effects on our bodies. We can become so busy gathering knowledge that we have no energy or motivation to see the relationship between our food choices and our general well being. This book neither promotes nor pans any existing diets. Instead, readers will find it useful as a guide to help decide which foods and manners of eating are best for them. The Tao of Eating reflects a way of living in harmony with all that we call life; it does not describe the process. Rather, it mirrors the philosophy of the Tao Te Ching: that living is deepened and informed by our turning inward and tapping into stillness as a source of clarity. The chapters are intended to be used as daily readings (or occasional readings.) They are not meant to be read all at once but, rather, assimilated and integrated over time and in harmony with the reader's needs. The content was derived through comparison of 14 translations of the Tao Te Ching, by Lao Tzu, and through the use of supportive Taoist literature, all of which is listed in the bibliography. Since I do not read Chinese, and because each translator views the Tao from an individual's perspective, I used these several translations to gain a sense of the original content of each chapter. The Tao is notably paradoxical; it speaks through the metaphor of water, which, while soft and apparently passive, can effortlessly wear away or break stone. Water enters a stagnant pool as readily as it does a flowing stream. Guided by Tao, no challenge is too great; all chaos can be transformed and harmonized. This approach applies to eating as well, and it serves to simplify and clarify the complexities and confusion inherent in America's foods and diets.
A practical guide to preventing and treating the toxic assault on our bodies • Shows how the practices of periodic detox and “rational retox” can counteract the toxic nature of our modern lifestyles, diets, and environment • Provides ancient Chinese methods and remedies that help the body repair itself • Includes detoxification techniques, formulas, and exercises that work within 10 days Despite the wonders of modern medicine, the state of human health throughout the world is eroding at an alarming rate. The long-term accumulation of toxins and acid waste in our bodies--both from the chemically contaminated air we breathe and water we drink as well as the toxins we ingest in the form of low quality food, preservatives, and additives--damages our organs, corrodes our joints and arteries, enervates our nervous system, and inhibits our immune system. Chronic pain and fatigue, hypertension and heart failure, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, indigestion, insomnia, and even acne, are all caused by the long-term accumulation of toxins in our bodies. In The Tao of Detox Daniel Reid combines traditional Eastern practices and the latest of modern Western thinking to offer detoxification methods that can repair in as little as seven to ten days much of the long-term damage done. He provides breathing exercises, massage techniques, and soft exercises such as yoga and tai chi that help the body to heal itself. He also explains the importance of “rational retoxification,” which allows the careful reintroduction of less healthy substances, and offers ways to counteract those toxins we can’t--or don’t want to--avoid, including alcohol and tobacco. Reid explains that, just as we care for our cars with regular tune-ups, by practicing periodic detox as well as “rational retox,” we can enjoy long and healthy lives and still be able to “eat, drink, and be merry.”
Through his intelligent, appealing integration of Eastern philosophy and practical advice, Laurence G. Boldt has helped thousands of readers find personal satisfaction in their work and personal lives. Now he applies these principles to the subject of abundance: How do we achieve material wealth without sacrificing our souls?In The Tao of Abundance, Boldt applies ancient wisdom to modern times, presenting eight guiding principles from Taoist philosophy geared to help readers make practical life changes that will bring them a truer and deeper sense of abundance. Boldt encourages readers to strike a balance between material and spiritual wealth--not to favor one over the other--and argues that increased material wealth comes as a natural byproduct of psychological fulfillment. With exercises designed to help readers find their own balance between societal demands and their own deepest desires, this helpful, inspiring book offers the chance to experience a new feeling of abundance in all aspects of life.
Chinese dietary therapy is one of the most important aspects of Chinese medicine. The Tao of Healthy Eating illuminates the theory and practice of Chinese dietary therapy with emphasis on the concerns and attitudes of Westerners. Commonsense metaphors explain basic Chinese medical theories and their application in preventive and remedial dietary therapy. It features a clear description of the Chinese medical understanding of digestion and all the practical implications of this day-to-day diet. Issues of Western interest are discussed, such as raw versus cooked foods, high cholesterol, food allergies, and candidiasis. It includes the Chinese medical descriptions of 200 Western foods and similar information on vitamins, minerals, and amino acids.

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