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Following the events of SOMETHING TO FEAR, Rick and the other survivors accept a new way of life under Negan's rule, but not everyone agrees. Collects THE WALKING DEAD #103-108
Fresh and bizarre terrors abound in Creepy Archives Volume 18, collecting issues #84–#88 of Warren Publishing's flagship horror anthology. Reprinting issues themed around doomed sports scenarios, classic monsters, Christmastime atrocities, and the entrancing planet Mars, this beautiful hardcover also features all original fan pages and letter columns! * Includes Bernie Wrightson's illustrated poem "A Martian Saga." * Both dark... and darkly funny! "With solid writing and unforgettable art ranging from ultra-realistic to bad acid trips, Creepy rightfully holds a place in comics history."—Fangoria
Taking over writing duties on Conan the Barbarian in the early 1980s, Bruce Jones brought his humor and horror sensibilities as well as his knack for telling great short stories to the title, invigorating John Buscema, who returned to work on the series with Conan #136. In The Chronicles of Conan: Isle of the Dead and Other Stories, these two comicbook titans lead Conan on a thrilling tour of Hyboria from the monsterinfested Bossonian Marshes to the hideous slave markets of Belthem as Conan encounters strange, supernatural foes, beguiling women, and overconfident rulers. * Stories like "The River of Death," "Titan's Gambit," and the twopart "Spider Isle" adventure are meticulously restored and recolored, and Jones and Buscema are joined by such talents as Ernie Chan, Mark Silvestri, Val Mayerik, Alfredo Alcala, and others. * This volume collects Conan the Barbarian issues #135 to #142, including all original series covers.
The zombie has cropped up in many forms--in film, in television, and as a cultural phenomenon in zombie walks and zombie awareness months--but few books have looked at what the zombie means in fiction. Tim Lanzendörfer fills this gap by looking at a number of zombie novels, short stories, and comics, and probing what the zombie represents in contemporary literature. Lanzendörfer brings together the most recent critical discussion of zombies and applies it to a selection of key texts including Max Brooks's World War Z, Colson Whitehead's Zone One, Junot Díaz's short story "Monstro, " Robert Kirkman's comic series The Walking Dead, and Seth Grahame-Smith's Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Within the context of broader literary culture, Lanzendörfer makes the case for reading these texts with care and openness in their own right. Lanzendörfer contends that what zombies do is less important than what becomes possible when they are around. Indeed, they seem less interesting as metaphors for the various ways the world could end than they do as vehicles for how the world might exist in a different and often better form.
In 2010, The Walking Dead premiered on AMC and has since become the most watched scripted program in the history of basic cable. Based on the graphic novel series by Robert Kirkman, The Walking Dead provides a stark, metaphoric preview of what the end of civilization might look like: the collapse of infrastructure and central government, savage tribal anarchy, and purposeless hordes of the wandering wounded. While the representation of zombies has been a staple of the horror genre for more than half a century, the unprecedented popularity of The Walking Dead reflects an increased identification with uncertain times. In The Walking Dead Live! Essays on the Television Show, Philip L. Simpson and Marcus Mallard have compiled essays that examine the show as a cultural text. Contributors to this volume consider how the show engages with our own social practices—from theology and leadership to gender, race, and politics—as well as how the show reflects matters of masculinity, memory, and survivor’s guilt. As a product of anxious times, The Walking Dead gives the audience an idea of what the future may hold and what popular interest in the zombie genre means. Providing insight into the broader significance of the zombie apocalypse story, The Walking Dead Live! will be of interest to scholars of sociology, cultural history, and television, as well as to fans of the show.

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