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A fully-outfitted edition of Prokopios' late Antique masterpiece of military history and ethnography--for the 21st-century reader. "At last . . . the translation that we have needed for so long: a fresh, lively, readable, and faithful rendering of Prokopios' Wars, which in a single volume will make this fundamental work of late ancient history-writing accessible to a whole new generation of students." --Jonathan Conant, Brown University
The Age of Justinian examines the reign of the great emperor Justinian (527-565) and his wife Theodora, who advanced from the theatre to the throne. The origins of the irrevocable split between East and West, between the Byzantine and the Persian Empire are chronicled, which continue up to the present day. The book looks at the social structure of sixth century Byzantium, and the neighbours that surrounded the empire. It also deals with Justinian's wars, which restored Italy, Africa and a part of Spain to the empire.
"The last major ancient historian, Byzantine scholar PROCOPIUS OF CAESAREA (c. 500 565) traveled with the army of Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I as a military adviser, and chronicled the wars he fought this is the primary source today of information about the reign of Justinian I. Here, in Books I and II of the eight-volume History of the Wars, Procopius recounts the Persian War between Justinian and the Persian Empire, a fascinating retelling that includes extensive details of geography and thorough accounts of battles, political intrigues, and interpersonal dramas. Far from dry, this is a thrilling read, one that echoes of this still turbulent region today. Students of the history of the Middle East will be enthralled by this ancient work. "
This book explores the professional and social lives of the soldiers who served in the army of the Byzantine Empire in the sixth century. More than just a fighting force, this army was the setting in which hundreds of thousands of men forged relationships and manoeuvred for promotion. The officers of this force, from famous generals like Belisarius and Narses to lesser-known men like Buzes and Artabanes, not only fought battles but also crafted social networks and cultivated their relationships with their emperor, fellow officers, families, and subordinate soldiers. Looming in the background were differences in identity, particularly between Romans and those they identified as barbarians. Drawing on numerical evidence and stories from sixth-century authors who understood the military, Justinian’s Men highlights a sixth-century Byzantine army that was vibrant, lively, and full of individuals working with and against each other.
The reign of Justinian (527--65) was a key phase in the transition from the Roman empire of classical times to the Byzantine empire of the Middle Ages. Justinian himself, born of peasant stock in a provincial backwater, was one of the greatest rulers yet, despite prodigious achievements, he remained an outsider in the sophisticated society of Constantinople. Here, John Moorhead reinterprets Justinian as man and monarch, together with his formidable empress, the ex-actress Theodora, and assesses the evidence from their time for the evolution of a distinctively medieval world.
History of three wars from the reign of Justinian, Byzantine emperor -- The Persian War, The Vandalic War, and The Gothic War. According to Wikipedia: "Procopius of Caesarea (Latin: Procopius Caesarensis, c. AD 500 – c. AD 565) was a prominent Byzantine scholar from Palestine. Accompanying the general Belisarius in the wars of the Emperor Justinian I, he became the principal historian of the 6th century, writing the Wars of Justinian, the Buildings of Justinian and the celebrated Secret History. He is commonly held to be the last major historian of the ancient world."
When Rome fell in 473AD, Constantinople became the capital of the remnants of the Roman Empire. Virtually every province west of Greece had fallen to the Goths or barbarians and in north Africa to the Visigoths. This historical novel tells the story of Theodora, one time actress or vedette who became the wife of Flavius Justinian, four years before he became Emperor Justinian. -- Theodora so impressed Justinian with her political expertise that he took the unprecedented step of allowing her to rule by his side as Empress. Together they began the task of restoring the Roman Empire to its former glory, reclaiming lands lost fifty years earlier. During the infamous Nikka riots, when Justinian was preparing to flee for his life, Theodora showed her courage, leadership and determination when she vowed to stay. She inspired her entourage with a rousing speech and commanded the young General Belisarius to attack and eliminate the mob which was occupying the stadium, which he did with devastating efficiency. Thereafter, Justinian devoted himself to codifying the law and rebuilding the city and its palaces and churches which had been destroyed by the riots, leaving Theodora and Belisarius to reconquer the lands which had made up the Roman Empire. -- This is the story of the battles for the lost lands from Libya to Italy and the relationship which developed between the Empress and the General as they struggled together to resurrect the glory that had been the greatest empire in the world.
The eastern half of the Roman Empire, economically the stronger, did not "fall" but continued almost intact, safe in the new capital of Constantinople. This empire is the subject of John Barker Jr.'s book and the central focus of his examination of questions of continuity and change.
Originally published by Duckworth and the University of California Press, Procopius is now available for the first time in paperback. Professor Cameron emphasises the essential unity of Procopius' three works and, starting from the `minor' ones, demonstrates their intimate connection with the Wars. Procopius' writings are seen to comprise a subtle whole; only if they are understood in this way can their historical value be properly appreciated. The result is a new evaluation of Procopius which will be central to any future history of the sixth century.
Justinian governed the Roman empire for more than thirty-eight years, and the events of his reign were recorded by Procopius of Caesarea, secretary of the general Belisarius. Yet, significantly, Procopius composed a history, a panegyric, as well as a satire of his own times. Anthony Kaldellis here offers a new interpretation of these writings of Procopius, situating him as a major source for the sixth century and one of the great historians of antiquity and Byzantium. Breaking from the scholarly tradition that views classicism as an affected imitation that distorted history, Kaldellis argues that Procopius was a careful student of the classics who displayed remarkable literary skill in adapting his models to the purposes of his own narratives. Classicism was a matter of structure and meaning, not just vocabulary. Through allusions Procopius revealed truths that could not be spoken openly; through anecdotes he exposed the broad themes that governed the history of his age. Elucidating the political thought of Procopius in light of classical historiography and political theory, Kaldellis argues that he owed little to Christianity, finding instead that he rejected the belief in providence and asserted the supremacy of chance. By deliberately alluding to Plato's discussions of tyranny, Procopius developed an artful strategy of intertextuality that enabled him to comment on contemporary individuals and events. Kaldellis also uncovers links between Procopius and the philosophical dissidents of the reign of Justinian. This dimension of his writing implies that his work is worthy of esteem not only for the accuracy of its reporting but also for its cultural polemic, political dissidence, and philosophical sophistication. Procopius of Caesarea has wide implications for the way we should read ancient historians. Its conclusions also suggest that the world of Justinian was far from monolithically Christian. Major writers of that time believed that classical texts were still the best guides for understanding history, even in the rapidly changing world of late antiquity.
Procopius lived from 500 to 565 in Eastern Rome. He is considered the last major ancient historian. The writings of Procopius are the primary source of information for the rule of the Roman emperor Justinian. Procopius was the author of a history in eight books of the wars fought by Justinian, a book on Justinian's public works, and a book called Secret History. The Secret History claims to be about scandals that could not be put in the published history books. The Gothic Wars are covered in the History of Wars.

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