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Nashville, August 1920. Thirty-five states have ratified the Nineteenth Amendment, twelve have rejected or refused to vote, and one last state is needed. It all comes down to Tennessee, the moment of truth for the suffragists, after a seven-decade crusade. The opposing forces include politicians with careers at stake, liquor companies, railroad magnates, and a lot of racists who don't want black women voting. And then there are the "Antis"--women who oppose their own enfranchisement, fearing suffrage will bring about the moral collapse of the nation. They all converge in a boiling hot summer for a vicious face-off replete with dirty tricks, betrayals and bribes, bigotry, Jack Daniel's, and the Bible. Following a handful of remarkable women who led their respective forces into battle, along with appearances by Woodrow Wilson, Warren Harding, Frederick Douglass, and Eleanor Roosevelt, The Woman's Hour is an inspiring story of activists winning their own freedom in one of the last campaigns forged in the shadow of the American Civil War, and the beginning of the great twentieth-century battles for civil rights.
This carefully edited collection has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Experience the American feminism in its core. Learn about the decades long fight, about the endurance and the strength needed to continue the battle against persistent indifference and injustice. Go back in time and get to know the founders and the followers, the characters of all the strong women involved in the movement. Find out what was the spark which started it all and kept the flame going. Learn about the organization, witness the backdoor conversations and discussions, read their personal correspondence, speeches and planned tactics. Learn about the relationship between great activists and what caused the fraction. This six volumes edition covers the women's suffrage movement from 1848 to 1922. Originally envisioned as a modest publication that would take only four months to write, it evolved into a work of more than 5700 pages written over a period of 41 years and was completed in 1922, long after the deaths of its visionary authors and editors, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. However, realizing that the project was unlikely to make a profit, Anthony had already bought the rights from the other authors. As a sole owner, she published the books herself and donated many copies to libraries and people of influence. Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902) was an American suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Susan B. Anthony (1820–1906) was an American suffragist, social reformer and women's rights activist. Harriot Stanton Blatch (1856-1940) was a suffragist and daughter of Elizabeth Stanton. Matilda Gage (1826–1898) was a suffragist, a Native American rights activist and an abolitionist. Ida H. Harper (1851–1931) was a prominent figure in the United States women's suffrage movement and biographer of Susan B. Anthony.
This edition covers the women's fight from 1883 to 1920. See the movement in its full light and learn what it took to obtain most basic civil rights. Learn about the decades long fight, about the endurance and the strength needed to continue the battle against persistent indifference and injustice. After the deaths of Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1902 and Susan B. Anthony in 1906, it fell upon Ida H. Harper, a protégé of Elizabeth Stanton, to document the voices and lives of hidden figures of the movement. Apart from a thorough look of USA, this book also gives an overview of the conditions of women's movement in rest of the world. Susan B. Anthony (1820–1906) was an American social reformer and women's rights activist. Born into a Quaker family she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society. Ida H. Harper (1851–1931) was a prominent figure in the United States women's suffrage movement. She was an American author, journalist and biographer of Susan B. Anthony.
The closing paragraphs of this book were written in the late summer of 1914, when the armies of every great power in Europe called upon their citizens, and the citizens of their colonies, to mobilised for savage, unsparing, barbarous warfare against one another, against small and unaggressive nations, against helpless women and children, and against civilisation itself. How mild, by comparison with the despatches in the daily newspapers, will seem this chronicle of women's militant struggle against political and social injustice in one small corner of Europe. Yet, let it stand as it was written, with peace—so-called, and civilisation, and orderly government as the background for heroism such as the world has seldom witnessed. The militancy of men, through all the centuries, has drenched the world with blood, and for these deeds of horror and destruction men have been rewarded with monuments, with great songs and epics. Yet, the militancy of women has harmed no human life save the lives of those who fought the battle of righteousness. Time alone has revealed what reward has been allotted to the women. In the black hour that struck in Europe, the men, indeed Governments, turned to their women and called on them to take up the work of keeping civilisation alive. Through all the harvest fields, in orchards and vineyards, women garnered food to send to the front, as well as for the children left fatherless by war. In the cities the women kept open the shops, drove trucks and trams, and operated machines in the factories which made clothing and the munitions for the impending battle ahead and altogether attended to a multitude of tasks to keep the wheels of commerce turning. At the first alarm of war, the militants proclaimed a truce, which was answered half-heartedly by Reginald McKenna, the Home Secretary’s announcement that all suffrage prisoners would be released who gave an undertaking "not to commit further crimes or outrages." A few days later, no doubt influenced by representations made to the Government by men and women of every political persuasion, Mr. McKenna announced in the House of Commons that it was the intention of the Government, to release unconditionally, all suffrage prisoners. So ended, for a short time, the war of women against men – until the clash of arms ceases. Then once more women will take up the arms they so generously laid down. “There can be no real peace in the world until woman, the mother half of the human family, are given liberty in the councils of the world” – Emmeline Pankhurst. YESTERDAY’S BOOKS FOR TODAY’S CHARITIES 10% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charity. ============= KEYWORDS-TAGS: My Own Story, Emmeline Pankhurst, , 1914, Act of Parliament, agitate, Annie, arrest, authorities, Bill, Cabinet, case, Christabel Pankhurst, committee, Conciliation, court, daughter, declare, demands, deputation, doctor, education, Edward, election, England, facilities, Fight, franchise, freedom, friends, girls, Gladstone, Government, Great War, Hall, Herbert Asquith, Holloway, House of Commons, hundred, hunger, imprisonment, justice, King, law, Lawrence, leaders, letters, Liberal, life long, Lloyd George, London, Lord, magistrate, majority, Manchester, meetings, members, men, militancy, Minister, movement, Parliament, party, Pethick, petition, place, pledge, police, policy, political, power, Prime Minister, prison, prisoners, property, protest, public, punishment, question, refuse, release, school, Secretary, sentence, session, Social Movement, speech, Street, suffrage, Suffragettes, suffragists, trial, Union, vote, Winston Churchill, woman, women, Women’s rights, world, World War One, WWI
Marking the centenary of female suffrage, this definitive history charts women's fight for the vote through the lives of those who took part, in a timely celebration of an extraordinary struggle An Observer Pick of 2018 A Telegraph Book of 2018 A New Statesman Book of 2018 Between the death of Queen Victoria and the outbreak of the First World War, while the patriarchs of the Liberal and Tory parties vied for supremacy in parliament, the campaign for women's suffrage was fought with great flair and imagination in the public arena. Led by Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughters Christabel and Sylvia, the suffragettes and their actions would come to define protest movements for generations to come. From their marches on Parliament and 10 Downing Street, to the selling of their paper, Votes for Women, through to the more militant activities of the Women's Social and Political Union, whose slogan 'Deeds Not Words!' resided over bombed pillar-boxes, acts of arson and the slashing of great works of art, the women who participated in the movement endured police brutality, assault, imprisonment and force-feeding, all in the relentless pursuit of one goal: the right to vote. A hundred years on, Diane Atkinson celebrates the lives of the women who answered the call to 'Rise Up'; a richly diverse group that spanned the divides of class and country, women of all ages who were determined to fight for what had been so long denied. Actresses to mill-workers, teachers to doctors, seamstresses to scientists, clerks, boot-makers and sweated workers, Irish, Welsh, Scottish and English; a wealth of women's lives are brought together for the first time, in this meticulously researched, vividly rendered and truly defining biography of a movement.
As the monthly periodical of the early twentieth century women's movement, "International Woman Suffrage" (originally "Ius Suffragii") was read by the leading figures of the suffrage movement in more than thirty countries. Featuring an in-depth introduction to the material and its social and historical context, this four-volume set reprints eight years of the journal, making this rare resource available to students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. In addition to women's fight for the vote, "International Woman Suffrage 1913-1920" covered such highly controversial topics as the age of consent for girls, alcohol control, education of girls, new employment openings for women, divorce law reform, health insurance for mothers, maternity benefits, minimum wages, prostitution, women medical workers, women police, women politicians, and other subjects of debate. Truly global for its time, issues included articles by women from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bohemia, British India, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Philippines, Rumania, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey and the USA.
The Edwardian period experienced a particularly vibrant periodical culture, with phenomenal growth in the numbers of titles published that were either aimed specifically at women, or else saw women as a key section of their readership or contributor group. It was an era of political ferment in which a number of 'progressive' traditions were formulated, shaped or abandoned, including socialism, feminism, modernism, empire politics, trade unionism and welfarism. Organized around some of the central themes of political thought and utopian thinking, this impressive collection gathers together classic articles from key periodicals. The set presents a comprehensive sourcebook of readings on Edwardian/Progressive era feminist thought, exploring the intervention of the radical public intellectuals working in these traditions in North America and the UK from 1900-1918.

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