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In this buoyant, inspirational A-Z, Angela Neustatter writes about the unexpectedly cheerful side of ageing. The ways we learn to deal with conflicts, problems, relationships, feelings about our appearance and behaviour through the years become lighter rather than heavier, even though the body may be moving in a different direction. Angela Neustatter considers in a lighthearted way what you can do to celebrate growing older. She wonders about the influence of age on dress - do you need to dress differently (no) or do you yourself start to change your views (yes), relationships with colleagues and friends, love and sex. This quirky book of observations will delight anyone of a certain age.
"I always thought twenty-five was the year I'd finally be grown up, the year the world would finally start taking me seriously, the year I would finally know what I wanted. And yet..." The Year I Turned 25 catalogues the ups and downs of a TV reporter in her mid-twenties, who takes on the added challenge of training an adorable, but misbehaving puppy. Sometimes melancholic and other times hilarious, this brave and thought-provoking memoir approaches dating, sexual assault and mental health in a personal, but relatable way. This book is for every woman who ever asked herself if something was wrong with her and for every dog lover who discovered true love in a puppy. "This project isn't about - and was never about - figuring out who I am. It's about figuring out how to figure out who I am...".
Turning sixteen is an unforgettable milestone, and each of these four sisters has her own story to tell. Rose, the oldest, feels like she has the most responsibility when her father dies, and yearns to be true to herself. Daisy wants to break free from her family, but trouble arises when she falls for a bad boy. Laurel struggles with the loss of a close relative and finds herself drawn to a boy who may actually understand. And Lily, the youngest sister, feels like nothing could be more difficult than actually being herself. These four books in one special bind-up make for a great value—and an even better read.
A New York Times correspondent shares his financial successes and mishaps, offering an everyman's guide to straightening out your money once and for all. Money management is one of our most practical survival skills—and also one we've convinced ourselves we're either born with or not. In reality, financial planning can be learned, like anything else. Part financial memoir and part research-based guide to attaining lifelong security, This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order is the book that everyone who has never wanted to read a preachy financial guide has been waiting for. John Schwartz and his wife, Jeanne, are pre-retirement workers of an economic class well above the poverty line, but well below the one percent. Sharing his own alternately harrowing and hilarious stories—from his brush with financial ruin and bankruptcy in his thirties to his short-lived budgeted diet of cafeteria french fries and gravy—John will walk you through his own journey to financial literacy, which he admittedly started a bit late. He covers everything from investments to retirement and insurance to wills (at fifty-eight, he didn't have one!), medical directives and more. Whether you're a college grad wanting to start out on the right foot or you're approaching retirement age and still wondering what a 401(K) is, This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order will help you become your own best financial adviser.
A PEN / E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award Finalist A real-life neurological mystery and captivating story of reinvention by the New York Times bestselling author of The Daring Book for Girls. Andrea Buchanan lost her mind while crossing the street one blustery March morning. The cold winter air triggered a coughing fit, and she began to choke. She was choking on a lot that day. A sick child. A pending divorce. The guilt of failing as a partner and as a mother. When the coughing finally stopped, she thought it was over. She could not have been more wrong. When she coughed that morning, a small tear ripped through her dura mater, the membrane covering the brain and spinal cord. But she didn’t know that yet. Instead, Andrea went on with her day, unaware that her cerebrospinal fluid was already beginning to leak out of that tiny opening. What followed was nine months of pain and confusion as her brain, no longer cushioned by a healthy waterbed of fluid, sank in her skull. At a time in her life when she needed to be as clear-thinking as possible?as a writer, as a mother, as a woman attempting to strike out on her own after two decades of marriage?she was plagued by cognitive impairment and constant pain, trapped by her own brain—all while mystifying doctors and pushing the limits of medical understanding. In this luminous and moving narrative, Andrea reveals the astonishing story of this tumultuous year—her fraught search for treatment; how patients, especially women, fight to be seen as reliable narrators of their own experiences; and how her life-altering recovery process affected both her and her family. The mind-brain connection is one of the greatest mysteries of the human condition. In some folklore, the cerebrospinal fluid around the brain is thought to be the place where consciousness actually begins. Here, in the pages of The Beginning of Everything, Andrea seeks to understand: Where was “I” when I wasn’t there?
With an introduction by Anne Enright Shortlisted for the Guardian First Book award, a story of civil war and a family's unbreakable bond. How you see a country depends on whether you are driving through it, or live in it. How you see a country depends on whether or not you can leave it, if you have to. As the daughter of white settlers in war-torn 1970s Rhodesia, Alexandra Fuller remembers a time when a schoolgirl was as likely to carry a shotgun as a satchel. This is her story - of a civil war, of a quixotic battle with nature and loss, and of a family's unbreakable bond with the continent that came to define, scar and heal them. Shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award in 2002, Alexandra Fuller's classic memoir of an African childhood is suffused with laughter and warmth even amid disaster. Unsentimental and unflinching, but always enchanting, Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight is the story of an extraordinary family in an extraordinary time.
Upon the sudden and tragic death of his father, Tory's marital bliss comes to a halt. His wife, Nya, and his family members try to help him cope with the pain of losing his father, but instead of choosing to have his arms around Nya, Tory chooses to have his lips constantly around a bottle of alcohol. Tory vanishes, and Nya looks for him with the help of local law enforcement and a hired private investigator. Unfortunately, no one turns up anything. After a while, Nya gives up hope of ever finding Tory. The thought of not knowing what happened to him will always be in the back of her mind, but it's time for her to move on. She meets a man named Vince Rappaport, who offers her comfort. Their talks turn into friendship, and the friendship soon turns into love. For the first time in a long time, Nya is happy to wake up in the morning. After years missing in action, Tory shows up on her doorstep. He desperately wants to restore their crumbled marriage. He seems like a changed man, but has he given up alcohol once and for all? Nya will have some tough decisions to make as her past confronts her future.

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