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Written in the late eighth century BC by Hesiod, one of the oldest known of Greek poets, Theogony and Works and Days represent the earliest account of the origin of the Greek gods, and an invaluable compendium of advice for leading a moral life, both offering unique insights into archaic Greek society. There are a number of modern translations of Hesiod available, rendered in serviceable English, but until now no one has created a work of literature equal to the original. This translation is the result of a unique collaboration between a classicist and a poet, capturing in English fourteeners the works’ true poetic flavor while remaining faithful to the Greek text and the archaic world in which it was composed. This translation contains a general introduction, a translator’s introduction, notes, and a glossary. It will be of interest to general readers, students of and specialists in classical literature, and lovers of poetry. "This Schlegel-Weinfield translation of Hesiod is superbly crafted: compelling, unforgettable poetry to be read aloud with delight and gratitude." —Allen Mandelbaum, Endowed Kenan Professor of Humanities, Wake Forest University "This exciting and unique collaboration between a classical philologist and a poet will not just provide insight into archaic Greek society, but also offer something new: the opportunity to experience the richness of Hesiod's style, language, and modes of thought with remarkable fidelity to the ancient Greek. Weinfield and Schlegel make Hesiod sing." —Carole Newlands, Classics Department, University of Wisconsin "Schlegel and Weinfield have produced one of the most remarkable of a current resurgence of translations from the classics, allowing the modern world to hear a poet who may have known Homer. Hesiod’s song makes us understand why the Greeks thought a poet could draw dolphins through the seas or raise the walls of Thebes. Weinfield translates by ear and transfers what he hears to the page, resonant fourteeners, a worthy echo of the past." —Charles Stanley Ross, Professor, Department of English, and Director, Comparative Literature, PurdueUniversity Catherine Schlegel is Associate Professor of Classics, University of Notre Dame. Henry Weinfield is Professor and Chair of Liberal Studies, University of Notre Dame, and translator of The Collected Poems of Stephane Mallarme.
This new, fully-annotated translation by a leading expert on Hesiodic poems combines accuracy with readability and includes an introduction and explanatory notes on these two works by one of the oldest known Greek poets. The Theogony contains a systematic genealogy and account of the struggles of the gods, and the Works and Days offers a compendium of moral and practical advice for a life of honest husbandry.
Greek poet Hesiod took many lines of thought and knowledge - myth, fable, personal experience, practical understanding - and wove them into one great whole. He did as much with the origins of the Greek gods in the Theogony, and then did the same in creating his manual of moral and practical advice, Works and Days. Here, Stephanie Nelson’s translation of Works and Days is paired with Richard S. Caldwell’s take on the Theogony. Along with introductory essays, these comprehensible versions of Hesiod’s two best-known poems make it easy for readers to see why Hesiod’s writings continue to resound through the ages.
These three classics of Greek literature — often called extended poems — helped bridge the oral and written traditions of Greek civilization. Like his contemporary, Homer, Hesiod artfully relates the struggles and triumphs of the gods as he offers moral and practical advice for earthbound mortals. A poetic treatise on agriculture and farming, Works and Days also presents instructions for daily life and social behavior. Theogony, on the other hand, concerns the origins of the gods, from the battle between the Titans to the ultimate triumph of Zeus. The Shield of Heracles holds further adventure, recounting one of the legendary hero's epic battles. This scrupulously accurate and readable translation is essential for students of Greek mythology and literature.
Hesiod belongs to the transitional period in Greek civilization between the oral tradition and the introduction of a written alphabet. His two major surviving works, the Theogony and the Works and Days, address the divine and the mundane, respectively. The Theogony traces the origins of the Greek gods and recounts the events surrounding the crowning of Zeus as their king. A manual of moral instruction in verse, the Works and Days was addressed to farmers and peasants. Introducing his celebrated translations of these two poems and of the Shield, a very ancient poem of disputed authorship, Apostolos Athanassakis positions Hesiod simultaneously as a philosopher-poet, a bard with deep roots in the culture of his native Boeotia, and the heir to a long tradition of Hellenic poetry. For this eagerly anticipated revised edition, Athanassakis has provided an expanded introduction on Hesiod and his work, subtly amended his faithful translations, significantly augmented the notes and index, and updated the bibliography. Already a classic, Hesiod: Theogony, Works and Days, Shield is now more valuable than ever for students of Greek mythology and literature. -- Peter L. Smith
"Robert Lamberton's Introduction is an excellent, concise exposition of current scholarly debate: his notes are informative and helpful. . . . Those who want a translation that captures something of the spirit of an ancient Greek poetic voice and its cultural milieu and transmits it in an appealing, lively, and accessible style will now turn to Lombardo." --M. A. Katz, Wesleyan University, in CHOICE
"The Theogony is one of the most important mythical texts to survive from antiquity, and we devote the first section to it. It tells of the creation of the present world order under the rule of almighty Zeus. The Works and Days, in the second section, describes a bitter dispute between Hesiod and his brother over the disposition of their father's property, a theme that allows Hesiod to range widely over issues of right and wrong. The Shield of Herakles, whose centerpiece is a long description of a work of art, is not by Hesiod, at least most of it, but it was always attributed to him in antiquity. It is Hesiodic in style and has always formed part of the Hesiodic corpus. It makes up the third section of this book"--Provided by publisher.

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