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Two journalists embarking on a year's adventure in Greece just as the country faces economic collapse seems foolhardy—but it's their decision to bring their crazy Jack Russell to a crisis-weary country with zero dog tolerance that tips the plan into actual madness After an Arctic winter, a recession, and a downturn in the newspaper industry, two journalists and their dog embark on an adventure in the wild and beautiful southern Peloponnese. A perfect plan, except for one thing—Greece is deep in economic crisis. And if fiscal failure can't overturn the couple's escapade in rural Greece, perhaps macabre local customs, a scorpion invasion, zero dog-tolerance, health scares, and touchy expats will. This is a humorous and insightful journey through one of the last unspoiled regions of Greece. It is full of encounters with warm-hearted, often eccentric, Greeks who show that this troubled country still has heroes, if not euros. In a hillside village in the Mani, the locals share their lives, their laughter, and their stories, and help chart the couple's own passage back to happiness. They even find a place in their hearts for their Greek nemesis—the local pungent goat cheese. Things really can only get feta.
Travel, Tourism and Identity addresses the psychological and social adjustments that occur when people make contact with others outside their social, cultural, or linguistic groups. Whether such contact is the result of tourism, seeking exile, or relocating abroad, the volume's contributors demonstrate how one's identity, cultural assumptions, and worldview can be brought into question. In some cases, the traveller finds that bridging the social and cultural gap between himself and the new society is fairly easy. In other cases, the traveller discovers that reorienting himself requires absorbing a new cultural history and traditions. The contributors argue that making these adjustments will surely enhance the traveller's or tourist's experience; otherwise the traveller or tourist will be at risk of becoming a marginalized figure, one disconnected from the society that surrounds him. This latest volume in the Culture & Civilization series features a collection of essays on travel and tourism. The essays cover a range of topics from historical travels to modern social identities. They discuss ancient travels, contemporary travels in Europe, Africa and sustainable eco-tourism, and the politics of tourism. Essays also address experiences of Grenada's "Spice Island" identity, and the effects of globalization and migrations on personal identity.
In this follow-up to travel memoir Things Can Only Get Feta, a woman finds herself unwilling to leave the remote Mani region of Greece, despite economic decline and looming social disaster In Things Can Only Get Feta, journalist Marjory McGinn's acclaimed autobiographical travel memoir, she, her partner, and their crazy dog left a Scottish village to embark on a year's adventure in the wild and beautiful southern Peloponnese. A year on, in 2011, the couple still found themselves emotionally bound to the remote Mani region and its people, despite the now out-of-control economic situation in Greece. Yet in the face of social upheaval and the growing desperation of their neighbors, Marjory saw even her resolve weakening. In this new tome, she explores how long her love affair with this country could truly last in these circumstances. As life implodes around them, the author seeks to unravel her own lifelong connection to this country by delving into her first adventure in another troubling time--Athens, during the military dictatorship of the 1970s. It is an intriguing back story that reveals as much about the journey of modern Greece as it will about her own.
The portrayal of Greece by the international press during the financial crisis has been seen by many independent observers as very harsh. The Greeks have often been blamed for a myriad of international political problems and external economic factors beyond their control. In this original and insightful work George Tzogopoulos examines international newspaper coverage of the unfolding economic crisis in Greece. American, British, French, German and Italian broadsheet and tabloid coverage is carefully analysed. The Greek Crisis in the Media debates and dissects the extent to which the Greek response to the financial crisis has been given fair and balanced coverage by the press and questions how far politics and national stereotypes have played their part in the reporting of events. By placing the Greek experiences and treatment alongside those of other EU members such as Portugal, Ireland, Italy and Spain, Tzogopoulos examines and highlights similarities and differences in the ways in which different countries tackled the challenges they faced during this crucial period and explores how and why the world's media reported these events.
Homer's Where The Heart Is continues the story where the acclaimed first travel memoir (Things Can Only Get Feta) left off. Two journalists and their crazy terrier are in the second year of their riotous adventure, living in the Mani region of southern Greece, and sharing an olive grove with their new Greek landlords. The location seems perfect, apart from Greeks on the edge, a gun-toting neighbour and a she-wolf with a shady past. But the couple soon face their biggest challenge yet, as they are pulled into the chaos of the country's worsening economic crisis − along with some of the original village characters from Feta − as Greece faces a disastrous exit from the eurozone. This candid and humorous memoir is also the story of the author's lifelong passion for Greece and its people. Woven into the narrative is Marjory's back story from another dark time, during the military dictatorship in the 1970s in Athens. It reveals as much about Greece as it does about her own personal journey. This edition contains the authors own photographs of southern Greece and many of the places mentioned in the book.
'Richard Clark writes with great authority and a deep affection for his subject, which comes from his long association with Greece...Marjory McGinn, bestselling author of Things Can Only Get Feta, Homer's Where the Heart Is, A Scorpion in the Lemon Tree'Clark is particularly good on the colours, flavours and scents of Greece. He has got under the skin of the place in a way few outsiders have been able to.'Mark Hudson, winner of Somerset Maugham Award, Thomas Cook Travel Book Award, Samuel Johnson Prize 'I love the way Clark writes, it is personal, it is human and deceptively simple.' Sara Alexi, bestselling author of The Greek Village SeriesIn the latest in his acclaimed Notebook series about the Greek Islands, Richard Clark continues his travels around Crete. In his now familiar style of travelogue and memoir he accompanies the reader on a journey to some of the places he has enjoyed visiting on this magical island.
Book 3 of the Peloponnese series Following on from the first two acclaimed books (Things Can Only Get Feta and Homer's Where The Heart Is), Marjory, Jim and their crazy dog Wallace are on a second odyssey in the southern Peloponnese but this time they end up in a peninsula they didn't choose, and a house they never thought they'd live in. How did this happen? Easy, this is Greece and nothing ever goes to plan. The couple's latest adventure in Koroni, on the Messinian peninsula, takes them on another perilous and funny journey, with house rental dramas, scorpion threats, the challenge of Greek language classes, and an unexpected publishing battle. But when they finally fall for the charm of unspoilt Koroni, make new friends and connect with some of the memorable characters from their Mani days, they discover once more just how Greek is their love. And there's not even a sting in the tale. Well ... almost! REVIEWS: "This book is rare within the travel writing genre. It cleverly combines a travel narrative with enlightened observations about Greece, while retaining a light and entertaining touch throughout." - Peter Kerr, best-selling author of Snowball Oranges

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