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Always put the listener first has been NPR's mantra since its inception in 1970. Now celebrating its 40th anniversary, NPR's programming attracts over 27 million listeners every week. This beautifully designed volume chronicles NPR's storied history, featuring dozens of behind-the-scenes photos, essays and original reporting by a who's who of NPR staff and correspondents, transcripts of memorable interviews, and an audio CD of the most memorable programming throughout the decades. Beyond an entertaining and inspiring tribute to NPR's remarkable history, this book is an intimate look at the news and stories that have shaped our world, from the people who were on the ground and on the air. With contributions from Steve Inskeep, Neal Conan, Robert Siegel, Nina Totenberg, Linda Wertheimer, Scott Simon, Melissa Block, P.J. O'Rourke, David Sedaris, Sylvia Poggioli, and many more, this is the perfect book for any NPR supporter, fan, or devotee.
Radio’s New Wave explores the evolution of audio media and sound scholarship in the digital age. Extending and updating the focus of their widely acclaimed 2001 book The Radio Reader, Hilmes and Loviglio gather together innovative work by both established and rising scholars to explore the ways that radio has transformed in the digital environment. Contributors explore what sound looks like on screens, how digital listening moves us, new forms of sonic expression, radio’s convergence with mobile media, and the creative activities of old and new audiences. Even radio’s history has been altered by research made possible by digital and global convergence. Together, these twelve concise chapters chart the dissolution of radio’s boundaries and its expansion to include a wide-ranging universe of sound, visuals, tactile interfaces, and cultural roles, as radio rides the digital wave into its second century.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 28th International Symposium on Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science, MFCS 2003, held in Bratislava, Slovakia in August 2003. The 55 revised full papers presented together with 7 invited papers were carefully reviewed and selected from 137 submissions. All current aspects in theoretical computer science are addressed, ranging from discrete mathematics, combinatorial optimization, graph theory, networking, algorithms, and complexity to programming theory, formal methods, and mathematical logic.
Introduction The PARA workshops in the past were devoted to parallel computing methods in science and technology. There have been seven PARA meetings to date: PARA’94, PARA’95 and PARA’96 in Lyngby, Denmark, PARA’98 in Umea, ? Sweden, PARA 2000 in Bergen, N- way, PARA 2002 in Espoo, Finland, and PARA 2004 again in Lyngby, Denmark. The ?rst six meetings featured lectures in modern numerical algorithms, computer science, en- neering, and industrial applications, all in the context of scienti?c parallel computing. This meeting in the series, the PARA 2004 Workshop with the title “State of the Art in Scienti?c Computing”, was held in Lyngby, Denmark, June 20–23, 2004. The PARA 2004 Workshop was organized by Jack Dongarra from the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Kaj Madsen and Jerzy Was ́niewski from the Technical University of Denmark. The emphasis here was shifted to high-performance computing (HPC). The ongoing development of ever more advanced computers provides the potential for solving increasingly dif?cult computational problems. However, given the complexity of modern computer architectures, the task of realizing this potential needs careful attention. For example, the failure to exploit a computer’s memory hi- archy can degrade performance badly. A main concern of HPC is the development of software that optimizes the performance of a given computer. The high cost of state-of-the-art computers can be prohibitive for many workplaces, especially if there is only an occasional need for HPC.
One of the first books to examine the status of broadcasting on its one hundredth anniversary, Radio’s Second Century investigates both vanguard and perennial topics relevant to radio’s past, present, and future. As the radio industry enters its second century of existence, it continues to be a dominant mass medium with almost total listenership saturation despite rapid technological advancements that provide alternatives for consumers. Lasting influences such as on-air personalities, audience behavior, fan relationships, and localism are analyzed as well as contemporary issues including social and digital media. Other essays examine the regulatory concerns that continue to exist for public radio, commercial radio, and community radio, and discuss the hindrances and challenges posed by government regulation with an emphasis on both American and international perspectives. Radio’s impact on cultural hegemony through creative programming content in the areas of religion, ethnic inclusivity, and gender parity is also explored. Taken together, this volume compromises a meaningful insight into the broadcast industry’s continuing power to inform and entertain listeners around the world via its oldest mass medium--radio.
From an award-winning black journalist, a tough-minded look at the treatment of ethnic minorities both in newsrooms and in the reporting that comes out of them, within the changing media landscape. From the Rodney King riots to the racial inequities of the new digital media, Amy Alexander has chronicled the biggest race and class stories of the modern era in American journalism. Beginning in the bare-knuckled newsrooms of 1980s San Francisco, her career spans a period of industry-wide economic collapse and tremendous national demographic changes. Despite reporting in some of the country’s most diverse cities, including San Francisco, Boston, and Miami, Alexander consistently encountered a stubbornly white, male press corps and a surprising lack of news concerning the ethnic communities in these multicultural metropolises. Driven to shed light on the race and class struggles taking place in the United States, Alexander embarked on a rollercoaster career marked by cultural conflicts within newsrooms. Along the way, her identity as a black woman journalist changed dramatically, an evolution that coincided with sweeping changes in the media industry and the advent of the Internet. Armed with census data and news-industry demographic research, Alexander explains how the so-called New Media is reenacting Old Media’s biases. She argues that the idea of newsroom diversity—at best an afterthought in good economic times—has all but fallen off the table as the industry fights for its economic life, a dynamic that will ultimately speed the demise of venerable news outlets. Moreover, for the shrinking number of journalists of color who currently work at big news organizations, the lingering ethos of having to be “twice as good” as their white counterparts continues; it is a reality that threatens to stifle another generation of practitioners from “non-traditional” backgrounds. In this hard-hitting account, Alexander evaluates her own career in the context of the continually evolving story of America’s growing ethnic populations and the homogenous newsrooms producing our nation’s too often monochromatic coverage. This veteran journalist examines the major news stories that were entrenched in the great race debate of the past three decades, stories like those of Elián González, Janet Cooke, Jayson Blair, Tavis Smiley, the tragedy of Hurricane Katrina, and the election of Barack Obama. Uncovering Race offers sharp analysis of how race, gender, and class come to bear on newsrooms, and takes aim at mainstream media’s failure to successfully cover a browner, younger nation—a failure that Alexander argues is speeding news organizations’ demise faster than the Internet.
This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 18th International Symposium Fundamentals of Computation Theory, FCT 2011, held in Oslo, Norway, in August 2011. The 28 revised full papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 78 submissions. FCT 2011 focused on algorithms, formal methods, and emerging fields, such as ad hoc, dynamic and evolving systems; algorithmic game theory; computational biology; foundations of cloud computing and ubiquitous systems; and quantum computation.

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