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'Christopher Hitchens... at his characteristically incisive best.' --The Times Thomas Paine is one of the greatest political advocates in history. Declaration of the Rights of Man, first published in 1791, is the key to his reputation. Inspired by his outrage at Edmund Burke's attack on the uprising of the French people, Paine's text is a passionate defence of man's inalienable rights. In Rights of Man Paine argues against monarchy and outlines the elements of a successful republic, including public education, pensions and relief of the poor and unemployed, all financed by income tax. Since its publication, Rights of Man has been celebrated, criticized, maligned and suppressed but here the polemicist and commentator Christopher Hitchens marvels at its forethought and revels in its contentiousness. Above all, Hitchens demonstrates how Thomas Paine's book forms the philosophical cornerstone of the first democratic republic, whose revolution is the only example that still speaks to us: the United States of America.
Thomas Paine's Collected Writings which include Common Sense, The Rights of Man, The American Crisis, and The Age of Reason written by legendary author Thomas Paine is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great classic will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, Thomas Paine's Collected Writings which include Common Sense, The Rights of Man, The American Crisis, and The Age of Reason is required reading for various courses and curriculums. And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Thomas Paine is highly recommended. Published by Classic House Books and beautifully produced, Thomas Paine's Collected Writings which include Common Sense, The Rights of Man, The American Crisis, and The Age of Reason would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.
Musaicum Books presents to you this meticulously edited Thomas Paine collection. This ebook has been designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Content: Common Sense The American Crisis The Rights of Man The Age of Reason The Republican Proclamation To the Authors of "Le Républicain" To the Abbé Sièyes To the Attorney General To Mr. Secretary Dundas Letters to Onslow Cranley To the Sheriff of the County of Sussex To Mr. Secretary Dundas Letter Addressed to the Addressers on the Late Proclamation Address to the People of France Anti-Monarchal Essay for the Use of New Republicans To the Attorney General, on the Prosecution against the Second Part On the Propriety of Bringing Louis XIV to Trial Reasons for Preserving the Life of Louis Capet Shall Louis XVI have Respite? Declaration of Rights Private Letters to Jefferson Letter to Danton A Citizen of America to the Citizens of Europe Appeal to the Convention The Memorial to Monroe Letter to George Washington Observations Dissertation on First Principles of Government The Constitution of 1795 The Decline and Fall of the English System of Finance Forgetfulness Agrarian Justice The Eighteenth Fructidor The Recall of Monroe Private Letter to President Jefferson Proposal that Louisiana be Purchased Thomas Paine to the Citizens of the United States To the French Inhabitants of Louisiana A Letter Addressed to the Abbe Raynal The Life of Thomas Paine by Moncure D. Conway
Collects several works covering a variety of political subjects, including independence from Britain for the American colonies, service in the Continental army, and the French Revolution.
Thomas Paine’s 1791 Rights of Man is an impassioned political tract showing how the critical thinking skills of evaluation and reasoning can, and must, be applied to contentious issues. Divided into two parts, Rights of Man is, first, a response to Edmund Burke’s arguments against the French Revolution, put forward in his Reflections on the Revolution in France – also available in the Macat Library – and, second, an argument for how to run a fair and just society. The first part is a sustained performance in evaluation: Paine takes Burke’s arguments, and systematically exposes the ways in which Burke’s reasons against revolution are inadequate compared to the necessity of having a just society run according to a universal notion of people’s rights as individuals. The second part turns to an examination of different political systems, setting out a powerfully-structured argument for universal rights, a clear constitution enshrined in law, and a universal right to vote. Though Paine is in many ways a stronger rhetorician than he is a clear thinker, his reasons for preferring democracy to hereditary forms of government are compelling, coherent and clear. Rights of Man is a masterclass in how to use good reasoning to present a persuasive argument.
Includes some of the writings that forged the spirit of a new nation, including "Common Sense," "The Crisis," "The Rights of Man," and The Age of Reason."
At the present day, when there is renewed interest in the concept of human rights and in the application of this concept to the problems of government,! it may be instructive to review an eighteenth-century dispute which was concerned precisely with these themes. Nor should the investigation be any less interesting because the disputants were Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine: both these men have also been the object of renewed attention and study in recent years. Critical work on the biography and bibliography of Paine is being done by Professor Aldridge and Col. Richard Gimbel respectively;2 while Burke is being well looked after, not only by the able team of experts who, under the leadership of Professor Copeland, are engaged in producing the critical edition of his Correspondence, but also by such individual scholars as D. C. Bryant, C. B. Cone, T. H. D. Mahoney, 3 P. J. Stanlis, C. Parkin, F. Canavan, and A. Cobban. But though Burke and Paine are being studied separately, little work appears to have been done on the relationship between them, apart from an 4 essay by Professor Copeland published more than twelve years ago. It is hoped that the present study, while it does not claim to add anything to the facts about Burke and Paine already known to his- 1 See Nehemiah Robinson, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
A volume of Thomas Paine's most essential works, showcasing one of American history's most eloquent proponents of democracy. Upon publication, Thomas Paine’s modest pamphlet Common Sense shocked and spurred the foundling American colonies of 1776 to action. It demanded freedom from Britain—when even the most fervent patriots were only advocating tax reform. Paine’s daring prose paved the way for the Declaration of Independence and, consequently, the Revolutionary War. For “without the pen of Paine,” as John Adams said, “the sword of Washington would have been wielded in vain.” Later, his impassioned defense of the French Revolution, Rights of Man, caused a worldwide sensation. Napoleon, for one, claimed to have slept with a copy under his pillow, recommending that “a statue of gold should be erected to [Paine] in every city in the universe.” Here in one volume, these two complete works are joined with selections from Pain's other major essays, “The Crisis,” “The Age of Reason,” and “Agrarian Justice.” Includes a Foreword by Jack Fruchtman Jr. and an Introduction by Sidney Hook
"Of this special de luxe Independence edition of the centenary issue of the writings of Thomas Paine there have been printed five hundred numbered copies." This set not numbered. v. 1. Life and appreciations.--v. 2. Common sense; Miscellany.--v. 3. The crisis.--v. 4. The rights of man. v. 1-v. 5. The rights of man. v. 2; Miscellany.--v. 6 the age of reason. v. 1.--v. 7. The age of reason. v. 2; Miscellany.--v. 8-9. Essays, letters, addresses.--v. 10. Essays, letters, poems.
In her own time and in ours, Hannah More (1745-1833) has been seen as a benefactress of the poor, writing and working selflessly to their benefit. Mona Scheuermann argues, however, that More's agenda was not simply to help the poor but to control them, for the upper classes in late eighteenth-century England were terrified that the poor would rise in revolt against Church and King. As much social history as literary study, In Praise of Poverty shows that More's writing to the poor specifically is intended to counter the perceived rabble rousing of Thomas Paine and other radicals active in the 1790s. In fact, her Village Politics was written by request of the Bishop of London as a direct response to Paine's Rights of Man. The much larger project of the Cheap Repository Tracts followed, and More was still writing in this vein two decades later. Scheuermann effectively, and perhaps controversially, places More in the context of her period's debate about the poor, proving More to be not a defender of the poor but of the conservative upper-class values she so wholeheartedly espoused.
Although the impact of works such as Common Sense and The Rights of Man has led historians to study Thomas Paine's role in the American Revolution and political scientists to evaluate his contributions to political theory, scholars have tacitly agreed not to treat him as a literary figure. This book not only redresses this omission, but also demonstrates that Paine's literary sensibility is particularly evident in the very texts that confirmed his importance as a theorist. And yet, because of this association with the 'masses', Paine is often dismissed as a mere propagandist. Thomas Paine and the Literature of Revolution recovers Paine as a transatlantic popular intellectual who would translate the major political theories of the eighteenth century into a language that was accessible and appealing to ordinary citizens on both sides of the Atlantic.
A biography of Thomas Paine, who spent his youth in England but became a hero of the American and French revolutions by writing books and pamphlets which embodied the ideals of freedom, equality, and democracy.
In its time over 600,000 copies of "Common Sense" were circulated through the Colonies. Not one to be politically correct, Thomas Paine and his thoughts were key to starting a revolution.

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