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Provides instructions for preparing Chinese-style appetizers, meat, poultry, seafood, egg dishes, vegetables, rice dishes, egg rolls, and sauces, and gives information on menus and cooking techniques
The ultimate gift for the food lover. In the same way that 1,000 Places to See Before You Die reinvented the travel book, 1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die is a joyous, informative, dazzling, mouthwatering life list of the world’s best food. The long-awaited new book in the phenomenal 1,000 . . . Before You Die series, it’s the marriage of an irresistible subject with the perfect writer, Mimi Sheraton—award-winning cookbook author, grande dame of food journalism, and former restaurant critic for The New York Times. 1,000 Foods fully delivers on the promise of its title, selecting from the best cuisines around the world (French, Italian, Chinese, of course, but also Senegalese, Lebanese, Mongolian, Peruvian, and many more)—the tastes, ingredients, dishes, and restaurants that every reader should experience and dream about, whether it’s dinner at Chicago’s Alinea or the perfect empanada. In more than 1,000 pages and over 550 full-color photographs, it celebrates haute and snack, comforting and exotic, hyper-local and the universally enjoyed: a Tuscan plate of Fritto Misto. Saffron Buns for breakfast in downtown Stockholm. Bird’s Nest Soup. A frozen Milky Way. Black truffles from Le Périgord. Mimi Sheraton is highly opinionated, and has a gift for supporting her recommendations with smart, sensuous descriptions—you can almost taste what she’s tasted. You’ll want to eat your way through the book (after searching first for what you have already tried, and comparing notes). Then, following the romance, the practical: where to taste the dish or find the ingredient, and where to go for the best recipes, websites included.
All the Recipes You Need to Enjoy Comforting Chinese Food at Home Ordering Chinese takeout is easy—but it’s definitely not the healthiest or most affordable way to enjoy Chinese comfort food at home. With this simple cookbook in your kitchen and a mighty wok in your hand, Chinese favorites are now quicker, healthier, and cheaper than delivery. The Essential Wok Cookbook is your guide to mastering the wok, the versatile pan that makes possible all of the Chinese restaurant dishes you love—no extra salt, oil, or MSG required. Beyond tips for selecting, seasoning, and caring for your wok, this cookbook also provides: • Step-by-step illustrations for how to fold a dumpling, egg roll, and wonton • Fun features on the origin stories and American reinventions of foods such as egg drop soup and fortune cookies • Recipe labels to help you decide what to make when you’re short on time (30 minutes or less) and tight on cash (under $10) • Recipe tips to swap ingredients, save time, make a dish more healthy, or kick up the heat If a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, start cooking today with your wok and see just how far The Essential Wok Cookbook will take you. Fire up the wok with recipes like Perfect Pork Pot Stickers, Easy Vegetable Stir-Fry, Lighter Egg Foo Young, Sweet Chili Shrimp, General Tso’s Chicken, Better Beef with Broccoli, and many more!
Winner of the 2011 James Beard Foundation Award for International Cooking, this is the authoritative guide to stir-frying: the cooking technique that makes less seem like more, extends small amounts of food to feed many, and makes ingredients their most tender and delicious. The stir-fry is all things: refined, improvisational, adaptable, and inventive. The technique and tradition of stir-frying, which is at once simple yet subtly complex, is as vital today as it has been for hundreds of years—and is the key to quick and tasty meals. In Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge, award-winning author Grace Young shares more than 100 classic stir-fry recipes that sizzle with heat and pop with flavor, from the great Cantonese stir-fry masters to the culinary customs of Sichuan, Hunan, Shanghai, Beijing, Fujian, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, and Malaysia, as well as other countries around the world. With more than eighty stunning full-color photographs, Young’s definitive work illustrates the innumerable, easy-to-learn possibilities the technique offers—dry stir-fries, moist stir-fries, clear stir-fries, velvet stir-fries—and weaves the insights of Chinese cooking philosophy into the preparation of beloved dishes as Kung Pao Chicken, Stir-Fried Beef and Broccoli, Chicken Lo Mein with Ginger Mushrooms, and Dry-Fried Sichuan Beans.
The warning has been sounded loud and clear: reduce your intake of red meats, salt, eggs, butter, and cream or run the risk of high blood pressure, heart problems, and cancer. But does this mean that all your favorite foods must be forsaken, or that bland is better? Not at all! Fortunately, Asian cuisines offer a wonderful selection of delicious, colorful, and easy-to-prepare dishes that actually help to promote better health. The Good-for-Your-Health All-Asian Cookbook presents over 220 exciting Asian dishes from eleven Asian countries, from Japan to Pakistan that are low in fat and cholesterol, low in salt, and low in calories. Very little oil or fat is used in the recipes, and salt and MSG have been wholly eliminated. Instead, generous use is made of Asia's miracles of flavor and aroma: garlic and fresh ginger root, to maintain full-bodied richness; spices and herbs, to add zest; rice wines, lemon juice, and vinegar, to provide the sultry pungency of sweet-and-sour dishes; and peppers and chilies, for those who like a little more "heat" in their lives.
American diners began to flock to Chinese restaurants more than a century ago, making Chinese food the first mass-consumed cuisine in the United States. By 1980, it had become the country's most popular ethnic cuisine. Chop Suey, USA offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise of Chinese food, revealing the forces that made it ubiquitous in the American gastronomic landscape and turned the country into an empire of consumption. Engineered by a politically disenfranchised, numerically small, and economically exploited group, Chinese food's tour de America is an epic story of global cultural encounter. It reflects not only changes in taste but also a growing appetite for a more leisurely lifestyle. Americans fell in love with Chinese food not because of its gastronomic excellence but because of its affordability and convenience, which is why they preferred the quick and simple dishes of China while shunning its haute cuisine. Epitomized by chop suey, American Chinese food was a forerunner of McDonald's, democratizing the once-exclusive dining-out experience for such groups as marginalized Anglos, African Americans, and Jews. The rise of Chinese food is also a classic American story of immigrant entrepreneurship and perseverance. Barred from many occupations, Chinese Americans successfully turned Chinese food from a despised cuisine into a dominant force in the restaurant market, creating a critical lifeline for their community. Chinese American restaurant workers developed the concept of the open kitchen and popularized the practice of home delivery. They streamlined certain Chinese dishes, such as chop suey and egg foo young, turning them into nationally recognized brand names.
The publication of the three volumes of “Pei Mei’s Chinese Cookbook,” in 1969, 1974, and 1979 were the first to teach authentic regional style Chinese cooking to the public. They were among the first to have full color pictures of the finished dish. It was easy to follow the recipes due to clear and concise instructions and being well laid out. Each recipe is met with enthusiasm by guests. “Pei-Mei’s Cookbooks” demystified Chinese cooking techniques. They taught the proper use of the cleaver, that the degree of heat is always critical, and that thickness and ingredient size contribute to texture, taste, and visual delight. The three volumes became de rigueur for every bride, and copies, often with hand-written notes in the margins, have been passed down from mother to daughter to granddaughter in both China and the United States for years. The first volume begins with a basic introduction to Chinese ingredients. It than divides its recipes regionally by China’s North, East, South, and West (Shanghai, Canton, Szechuan and Peking) with 25 recipes for each group and an additional twenty snacks and desserts. This provides an excellent introduction to the incredible variety of Chinese recipes.

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