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This edition contains Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking Glass. It is illustrated throughout by Sir John Tenniel, whose drawings for the books add so much to the enjoyment of them. Tweedledum and Tweedledee, the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat, the Red Queen and the White Rabbit all make their appearances, and are now familiar figures in writing, conversation and idiom. So too, are Carroll's delightful verses such as 'The Walrus and the Carpenter' and the inspired jargon of that masterly Wordsworthian parody, 'The Jabberwocky'.
" I can't explain myself, I'm afraid, sir," said Alice, "Because I'm not myself, you see."When Alice sees a white rabbit take a watch out of its waistcoat pocket she decides to follow it, and a sequence of most unusual events is set in motion. This mini book contains the entire topsy-turvy stories of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, accompanied by practical notes and Martina Pelouso's memorable full-colour illustrations.
Alice again enters a fantastical world, this time by climbing through a mirror into the world that she can see beyond it. There she finds that, just like a reflection, everything is reversed. Through the Looking-Glass includes such verses as "Jabberwocky" and "The Walrus and the Carpenter", and the episode involving Tweedledum and Tweedledee. The mirror which inspired Carroll remains displayed in Charlton Kings.
When you look at fine connections, it's hard to say exactly what relation "Alice in Wonderland" has to this book, "Through the Looking-Glass," Oh, it's plainly the same girl, though she seems older, here, and some characters (like Tweedledum and Tweedledee) appear in both. But she doesn't get there the same way, and doesn't refer to her adventures in Wonderland so much as once. Oh well: maybe it's all a dream and she can't remember the last one -- or maybe the magic through the Looking-Glass has hold of her, just as it has hold of Humpty Dumpty, or the Walrus and the Carpenter.
Introduction by A. S. Byatt Illustrations by John Tenniel Includes commissioned endnotes Conceived by a shy British don on a golden afternoon to entertain ten-year-old Alice Liddell and her sisters, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass have delighted generations of readers in more than eighty languages. “The clue to the enduring fascination and greatness of the Alice books,” writes A. S. Byatt in her Introduction, “lies in language. It is play, and word-play, and its endless intriguing puzzles continue to reveal themselves long after we have ceased to be children.” Includes a Modern Library Reading Group Guide
An abridged version of the stories that tell of Alice, who falls down a rabbit hole and steps through a mirror, thereby experiencing unusual adventures with a variety of nonsensical characters.
By falling down a rabbit hole and stepping through a mirror, Alice experiences unusual adventures with a variety of nonsensical characters.

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