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Following the conquest of Poland by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union in 1939, hundreds of thousands of Polish families were torn from their homes and sent eastwards to the arctic wastes of Siberia. Prisoners of war, refugees, those regarded as 'social criminals' by Stalin's regime, and those rounded up by sheer chance were all sent 'to see the Great White Bear'. However, with Hitler's invasion of the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa just two years later, Russia and the Allied powers found themselves on the same side once more. Turning to those that it had previously deemed 'undesirable', Russia sought to raise a Polish army from the men, women and children that it had imprisoned within its labour camps. In this remarkable work, renowned historian Professor Norman Davies draws from years of meticulous research to recount the compelling story of this unit, the Polish II Corps or 'Anders Army', and their exceptional journey from the Gulag of Siberia through Iran, the Middle East and North Africa to the battlefields of Italy to fight shoulder-to-shoulder with Allied forces. Complete with previously unpublished photographs and first-hand accounts from the men and women who lived through it, this is a unique visual and written record of one of the most fascinating episodes of World War II.
The western migration of more than 500,000 people is one of America's legendary stories. From 1806, when Lewis and Clark "opened" the West, until the 1869 joining of the railroads, these pioneers set out on trails leading to various points westward. Forsaking all they knew -- sometimes leaving behind friends and family -- the emigrants moved toward the unknown with hope for a new start and a better life. Within this general migration is the story of some seventy thousand Mormon pioneers who traveled on foot, in wagon trains, and, during a four-year experiment, in handcart companies to their Zion in the Great Basin of the West -- Salt Lake City. Beginning with their expulsion from Nauvoo, Illinois, in 1846 and for the succeeding twenty-two years, the migration of the Mormon pioneers was a curious saga in the settlement of the American West. Mostly poor, they came from the eastern United States, Canada, England, the European continent, and South Africa. They traveled on ships, canal boats, trains, and riverboats and then came on foot in wagon trains and handcart companies. An 1849 observer in Florence, Nebraska, described a Mormon wagon train in this way: "They began to bend their way westward over the boundless plains that lie between us and the Valley of the Great Salt Lake. Slowly and majestically they moved along, displaying a column of upwards of three hundred wagons, cattle, sheep, hogs, horses, mules, chickens, turkeys, geese, doves, goats, and...lots of men, women and children. In this company was...the farmer, the merchant, the doctor, the minister, and almost every thing necessary for a settlement in a new country".
Will a vow of vengeance harden his heart to love... Abducted from her family home in Savannah, Sophia Deveraux is thrown into an army stockade with Cherokee prisoners destined for the West. Stalked by her abductor, she is protected by three men on the long, deadly journey to Indian Territory. Despite her starved and battered body and soul, one of them steals her heart. When Clay Jefferson lost his family, he vowed to kill whoever murdered them. Trying to help prevent the removal of the Cherokees from Georgia, he finds his heart torn in two when protecting Sophia becomes more important than his vow of vengeance. Sophia is attacked but finds an inner strength she never knew she had, and Clay is forced to make a difficult decision - honor his vow or listen to his heart? STEAM LEVEL: Sweet
Few reference works in philosophy have articles on hope. Few also are systematic or large-scale philosophical studies of hope. Hope is admitted to be important in people's lives, but as a topic for study, hope has largely been left to psychologists and theologians. For the most part philosophers treat hope en passant. My aim is to outline a general theory of hope, to explore its structure, forms, goals, reasonableness, and implications, and to trace the implications of such a theory for atheism or theism. What has been written is quite disparate. Some see hope in an individualistic, often existential, way, and some in a social and political way. Hope is proposed by some as essentially atheistic, and by others as incomprehensible outside of one or another kind of theism. Is it possible to think consistently and at the same time comprehensively about the phenomenon of human hoping? Or is it several phenomena? How could there be such diverse understandings of so central a human experience? On what rational basis could people differ over whether hope is linked to God? What I offer here is a systematic analysis, but one worked out in dialogue with Ernst Bloch, Immanuel Kant, and Gabriel Marcel. Ernst Bloch of course was a Marxist and officially an atheist, Gabriel Marcel a Christian theist, and Immanuel Kant was a theist, but not in a conventional way.
Following the success of their previous collaborations, Illinois Hiking and Backpacking Trails, Revised Edition and A Guide to Mountain Bike Trails in Illinois, Walter and George Zyznieuski offer this concise and handy resource for all outdoor enthusiasts interested in the outstanding nature centers and interpretive trails throughout Illinois. The 135 sites detailed in this illustrated guide are located in municipal and county parks, forest preserves, state parks, wildlife refuges, and the Shawnee National Forest. Sites range from the Apple River Canyon State Park in northwest Illinois to the Cache River State Natural Area in southern Illinois. This guide will assist individuals and groups in successfully planning visits to these areas by clearly identifying trails that are fairly short and well suited for families and those nature centers that provide hands-on experiences viewing wildlife and nature exhibits and participating in a nature program or activity. Also, those trails that are accessible to families with strollers, individuals with disabilities, and the elderly are identified with symbols and described throughout the book. Detailed descriptions of each center and trail are included along with directions, some maps and photographs, hours of operation, and contact information, including web sites, where available. Sixty-seven nature centers and interpretive trails are featured for northern Illinois, including Chicago Botanic Garden, Spring Valley Nature Sanctuary and Volkening Heritage Farm, The Morton Arboretum, the Chicago Portage National Historic Site, and the Black Hawk State Historic Site. For those interested in central Illinois, forty-one nature centers and trails are listed, including Kickapoo Creek Park, Chautauqua National Wildlife Refuge, Valentine Park, Salt Fork River Forest Preserve, Merwin Nature Preserve, Forest Park Nature Center and Adams Wildlife Sanctuary. Twenty-seven nature centers and trails are described for southern Illinois. Among these are Lusk Creek Canyon, Giant City State Park, Cache River State Natural Area, Ferne Clyffe State Park, Rim Rock, and Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

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