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Leaders are usually held responsible for the trust, health and success of an organization, but it is the culture of organizations that provides the true foundation for these important factors. The leader's personality and skills influence how a trustful environment and working relationship is created, but the organization has a culture, tradition and experience of its own which influences the leader's success. The level of trust in an organization's culture will ultimately determine whether or not it is trustful, healthy and successful. Based on the interview of current and former chief executive officers from profit and non profit organizations to record their experiences in creating trust in their environment and their perceptions of the health of their organizations. The collected data reveals: - The qualities of a "trusted" leader; - How they created trust or; - How trust was destroyed in organizations; - How leaders worked in distrustful environments; - How to create a more healthy organization. This timely work will be of interest to organizations and occupational sociologists, human resource workers, social psychologists, and students of management courses.
This book samples recent and emerging trust research in education including an array of conceptual approaches, measurement innovations, and explored determinants and outcomes of trust. The collection of pathways explores the phenomenon of trust and establishes the significance of trust relationships in school life. It emboldens the claim that trust merits continued attention of both scholars and practitioners because of the role it plays in the production of equity and excellence. Divided into four parts, the book explores trust under the rubrics of learning, teaching, leading and bridging. The book proposes a variety of directions for future research. These include the simultaneous investigation of trust from the prospectives of various trusters, and at both the individual and group levels, longitudinal research designs, and an elaboration of methods.
Leadership: A Communication Perspective has been at the forefront of university and college leadership courses for nearly three decades, providing a compelling, authoritative introduction to leadership as a communication-based activity. The new edition continues the tradition of excellence with an up-to-date treatment of theory and research combined with practical, real-world advice for improving communication competence and leadership effectiveness. Relevant: The authors profile contemporary leaders and organizations like Alibaba’s Jack Ma, Zappos’ Tony Hsieh, Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, Uber, The Container Store, Airbnb, Chipotle, the Waffle House, Nordstrom, and Google. Their presentation balances current scholarship and trends with historical perspectives to provide a fuller understanding of the study and practice of leadership. Comprehensive: Leadership and followership are examined in multiple contexts, including organizational leadership, public leadership, and leadership in groups and teams. Topics new to this edition include transcendent followership, the leadership skills approach, team coaching, escalation of commitment, invisible leadership, cultural intelligence, trigger events, and resilience. Full-featured: Self-Assessments measure readers’ perceptions of personal leadership skills, communication style, cultural intelligence, motivation to lead, and more. Case Studies examine leadership situations and pose thoughtful questions that prompt students to apply their experiences and understandings. Research Highlights summarize seminal and recent scholarship. Chapter Takeaways reinforce important concepts and action steps. Application Exercises offer abundant opportunities to explore, practice, and reflect on chapter content. Cultural Connections discuss leadership expectations and behaviors in other cultures. Leadership on the Big Screen correlates chapter concepts with the themes of popular films and documentaries.
'This is an extremely welcome and timely contribution which extends our understanding of the relationship between trust and HRM in organizations, a relationship which has until now been under explored. This excellent edited collection explores trust in the context of HRM stage by stage from pre-entry to exit in a thoughtful and provocative way. In each chapter leading scholars in the trust and HRM fields highlight critical issues for both researchers and practitioners to consider. Key reading for anyone interested in how HRM can enhance and develop trust and how trust can contribute to the success of HRM.' – Antoinette Weibel, University of Konstanz, Germany and President of First International Network on Trust 'The issue of trust in organizations is an extremely important one, given the global economic situation. This edited collection is outstanding, comprised of the leading academics in the field and highlighting the challenges for HR over the coming decade. A must read for those in HRM, if we are to build trust in organizations in the future.' – Cary L. Cooper, CBE, Lancaster University Management School, UK An organization's human resource management (HRM) policies and their implementation have long been claimed to influence trust within an organizational environment. However there has, until now, been a limited examination of the relationship between the two. In this unique book, the contributors explore the HRM cycle from entry to exit, and examine in detail the issue of trust and its links with HRM. Each chapter takes an aspect of HRM including; selection, performance management, careers and personal development, training, change management and exit, and offers a new understanding and insight into the role, importance and challenges to trust within these processes. This timely book will prove to be an invaluable resource for academics interested in trust, HR and organizational behaviour. HR professionals should also not be without this path-breaking study.
The last century witnessed dramatic changes in the practice of health care, and coming decades promise advances that were not imaginable even in the relatively recent past. Science and technology continue to offer new insights into disease pathways and treatments, as well as mechanisms of protecting health and preventing disease. Genomics and proteomics are bringing personalized risk assessment, prevention, and treatment options within reach; health information technology is expediting the collection and analysis of large amounts of data that can lead to improved care; and many disciplines are contributing to a broadening understanding of the complex interplay among biology, environment, behavior, and socioeconomic factors that shape health and wellness. On February 25 - 27, 2009, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened the Summit on Integrative Medicine and the Health of the Public in Washington, DC. The summit brought together more than 600 scientists, academic leaders, policy experts, health practitioners, advocates, and other participants from many disciplines to examine the practice of integrative medicine, its scientific basis, and its potential for improving health. This publication summarizes the background, presentations, and discussions that occurred during the summit.
The effective functioning of a democratic society—including social, business, and political interactions—largely depends on trust. Yet trust remains a fragile and elusive resource in many of the organizations that make up society's building blocks. In their timely volume, Trust and Distrust in Organizations, editors Roderick M. Kramer and Karen S. Cook have compiled the most important research on trust in organizations, illuminating the complex nature of how trust develops, functions, and often is thwarted in organizational settings. With contributions from social psychologists, sociologists, political scientists, economists, and organizational theorists, the volume examines trust and distrust within a variety of settings—from employer-employee and doctor-patient relationships, to geographically dispersed work teams and virtual teams on the internet. Trust and Distrust in Organizations opens with an in-depth examination of hierarchical relationships to determine how trust is established and maintained between people with unequal power. Kurt Dirks and Daniel Skarlicki find that trust between leaders and their followers is established when people perceive a shared background or identity and interact well with their leader. After trust is established, people are willing to assume greater risks and to work harder. In part II, the contributors focus on trust between people in teams and networks. Roxanne Zolin and Pamela Hinds discover that trust is more easily established in geographically dispersed teams when they are able to meet face-to-face initially. Trust and Distrust in Organizations moves on to an examination of how people create and foster trust and of the effects of power and betrayal on trust. Kimberly Elsbach reports that managers achieve trust by demonstrating concern, maintaining open communication, and behaving consistently. The final chapter by Roderick Kramer and Dana Gavrieli includes recently declassified data from secret conversations between President Lyndon Johnson and his advisors that provide a rich window into a leader's struggles with problems of trust and distrust in his administration. Broad in scope, Trust and Distrust in Organizations provides a captivating and insightful look at trust, power, and betrayal, and is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the underpinnings of trust within a relationship or an organization. A Volume in the Russell Sage Foundation Series on Trust
The issues of trust and job satisfaction have taken on a greater strategic importance in organizations since the post-Enron scandal. Without trust or the lack of it among organizational members and between management and employees, organizational communication, knowledge management, organizational performance, and involvement may tend to close down. Trust has been identified as a crucial ingredient for organizational effectiveness. A linkage between trust and job satisfaction in private organizations has been established by researchers; however, in the U.S. federal government, the linkage between organizational trust and job satisfaction has not yet been studied. This study, therefore, explores the relationship between organizational trust and job satisfaction in seven selected small, medium, and large U.S. federal agencies. This study indicated that there are no significant differences between males and females, however, significant differences in attitudes between supervisors and nonsupervisors were found regarding what good communications meant and how they interpret the question, "top management truly listens to employees' concerns." Nonsupervisors tend to disagree more frequently than supervisors. The study also found that there are significant association between gender, age group, job location, position, and occupation and agency. The differences in attitudes between supervisors and nonsupervisors about what would make communications seem good and what would contribute to the belief that top management listens to employees' concerns lead to the conclusion that there is a disconnection among organizational members and among management and employees. This disconnection may lead to mistrust, job dissatisfaction and the difficulty in attracting and retention of human talents.

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