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Here for the first time complete in print is the famous pictorial survey of Henry VIII's navy compiled in 1546 by Anthony Anthony, a clerk in the ordnance office. Originally comprising three rolls of vellum, the MS features paintings of each of the king's 58 ships, below which are set details of their guns, shot, and related equipment. Two of the original rolls were allegedly given by Charles II to Samuel Pepys, who had them cut to form a volume which is one of the treasures of his library, now at Magdalene College, Cambridge. The other roll remains in the British Library. Several of the illustrations have become familiar, especially that of the Mary Rose, herself already a wreck when Anthony presented his work to the king. The present edition re-assembles the three parts of the Anthony Roll, allowing the document to be seen in its original sequence for the first time in over 300 years. The fleet which Henry VIII created is revealed as the king saw it in the last year of his life. Because of the unusual format of the MS, a complete facsimile is not presented here. Anthony's paintings at Magdalene and in the British Library are reproduced in full colour from newly commissioned photographs. Adjacent to each ship illustration is the relevant text, given in its original spelling. In the Introduction Anthony's personal and professional career is set out for the first time, and the subsequent history of his MS is revealed as a subject of interest in its own right. In order to explore the many facets of this remarkable document, a work of art as well as an administrative record, the Introduction includes essays by experts in the field of ordnance, art history, heraldry and fabric, and on the oared vessels which were so distinctive a feature of the navy of the time. Marine archaeologists from the Mary Rose Trust examine the accuracy of Anthony's representation and inventory of the Mary Rose in the light of the excavation of the ship. In the second part of this
Here for the first time complete in print is the famous pictorial survey of Henry VIII's navy compiled in 1546 by Anthony Anthony, a clerk in the ordnance office. Originally comprising three rolls of vellum, the MS features paintings of each of the king's 58 ships, below which are set details of their guns, shot, and related equipment. Two of the original rolls were allegedly given by Charles II to Samuel Pepys, who had them cut to form a volume which is one of the treasures of his library, now at Magdalene College, Cambridge. The other roll remains in the British Library. Several of the illustrations have become familiar, especially that of the Mary Rose, herself already a wreck when Anthony presented his work to the king. The present edition re-assembles the three parts of the Anthony Roll, allowing the document to be seen in its original sequence for the first time in over 300 years. The fleet which Henry VIII created is revealed as the king saw it in the last year of his life. Because of the unusual format of the MS, a complete facsimile is not presented here. Anthony's paintings at Magdalene and in the British Library are reproduced in full colour from newly commissioned photographs. Adjacent to each ship illustration is the relevant text, given in its original spelling. In the Introduction Anthony's personal and professional career is set out for the first time, and the subsequent history of his MS is revealed as a subject of interest in its own right. In order to explore the many facets of this remarkable document, a work of art as well as an administrative record, the Introduction includes essays by experts in the field of ordnance, art history, heraldry and fabric, and on the oared vessels which were so distinctive a feature of the navy of the time. Marine archaeologists from the Mary Rose Trust examine the accuracy of Anthony's representation and inventory of the Mary Rose in the light of the excavation of the ship. In the second part of this
Join historian Suzannah Lipscomb as she reveals the hidden secrets of palaces, castles, theatres and abbeys to uncover the stories of Tudor England. From the famous palace at Hampton Court where dangerous court intrigue was rife, to less well-known houses, such as Anne Boleyn's childhood home at Hever Castle or Tutbury Castle where Mary Queen of Scots was imprisoned, follow in the footsteps of the Tudors in the places that they knew. In the corridors of power and the courtyards of country houses we meet the passionate but tragic Kateryn Parr, Henry VIII's last wife, Lady Jane Grey the nine-day queen, and hear how Sir Walter Raleigh planned his trip to the New World. This lively and engaging book reveals the rich history of the Tudors and paints a vivid and captivating picture of what it would have been like to live in Tudor England.
A comprehensive overview of the activities of the British navy in the Baltic Sea from the earliest times until the twentieth century.
In the sixteenth century England turned from being an insignifcant part of an offshore island into a nation respected and feared in Europe. This was not achieved through empire building, conquest, large armies, treaties, marriage alliances, trade or any of the other traditional means of exercising power. Indeed England was successful in few of these. Instead she based her power and eventual supremacy on the creation of a standing professional navy which firstly would control her coasts and those of her rivals, and then threaten their trade around the world. This emergence of a sea-power brought with it revolutionary ship designs and new weapon-fits, all with the object of making English warships feared on the seas in which they sailed. Along with this came the absorption of new navigational skills and a breed of sailor who fought for his living. Indeed, the English were able to harness the avarice of the merchant and the ferocity of the pirate to the needs of the state to create seamen who feared God and little else. Men schooled as corsairs rose to command the state's navy and their background and self-belief defeated all who came against them. This is their story; the story of how seizing command of the sea with violent intent led to the birth of the greatest seaborne empire the world has ever seen.
A detailed synthesis of information relating to the English navy during the Tudor period, an era that actually began in 1483 and continued through to the start of the 17th century. This study examines not only the technical aspects of naval history but also the manner in which the navy worked.
The life of King Henry VIII is described in this book, which is part of the British History Makers series on famous figures who shaped historical events. Through the use of artwork, documentary evidence, and fact-filled information panels, a rounded picture is given of the turbulent time in which he lived.

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