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This statistical volume contains data usually unavailable in other statistical publications. It gives statistics for two groups of countries in their 2007 borders. First, since year 1950 (for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007), it provides statistical data for all countries of the world (232 countries). Second, since year 1 AD (for 0001, 1000, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1820, 1870, 1880, 1890, 1900, 1913, 1920, 1929, and 1938), it provides data for a smaller group of countries (133 countries). This book is based on the groundbreaking works of Angus Maddison but it differs from his books in that it gives data up to the most recent year available and calculates GDP (gross and per capita) in the prices of that most recent year. For the recent years, the World Bank, CIA, and Encyclopedia Britannica were principal sources. But, despite the author's great debt to these sources, the preponderance of data in the book is not direct citations from them but rather the result of calculations. Among other computational techniques he uses a new logarithmic interpolation which takes care of cross-country statistical distortions when calculating in the prices of the most recent year. For every line of data (for every country, each year), he provides a note on the technique used in obtaining his estimate (i. e., proxy, exponential interpolation, direct estimate with source citation, etc.). Dr. Avakov's annual title Quality of Life, Balance of Powers, and Nuclear Weapons gives a current snapshot of world statistics. This new work, Two Thousand Years of Economic Statistics, gives the population and current price GDP data in a historical perspective.
Who's winning and who's losing? This book provides hard data for all who ponder the shifting sands of power, whether economic, military or demographic, and seek keys to decipher the media news. Going far beyond the major powers and the BRIC countries, this economic statistical work, issued every few years, presents historical statistics in nine sections. This is Volume 2, which lists (1) Population/Growth Rates of Population by country, (2) GDP Per Capita/Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by country, and (3) GDP/Growth Rates of GDP by country. Volume 1 (sold separately) covers: (1) Population by rank, (2) GDP Per Capita by rank, (3) GDP by rank, (4) Growth Rates of Population by rank, (5) Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by rank, (6) Growth Rates of GDP by rank. This biennial work contains data generally not available elsewhere, and in ways that help make it possible to draw useful comparisons. First, it provides statistical data for all countries of the world (236 countries, within their 2011 borders) since the year 1950 (by decade, with 2011 in addition), plus forecasts for 2020 and 2030. Second, it provides data for 135 countries since the year 1000 (with data for 1000, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1820, 1870, 1880, 1890, 1900, 1913, 1920, 1929, and 1938). Third, it provides data for 134 countries for the first year AD. In Volume 1 [572 pages], this data is arranged by rank, or size. In this, Volume 2 [438 pages], the countries are listed alphabetically. This book is based on the groundbreaking works of Angus Maddison but it gives data up to the most recent year available and calculates GDP (gross and per capita) in the prices of that year. For recent years, the World Bank, CIA, and Encyclopedia Britannica were principal sources. But, despite the author's great debt to these sources, the preponderance of data in the book is not direct citations from them but rather the result of calculations. Among other computational techniques he uses a new logarithmic interpolation which takes care of cross-country statistical distortions when calculating in the prices of the most recent year. For every line of data (for every country, each year), he provides a note on the technique used in obtaining his estimate (i.e., proxy, exponential interpolation, direct estimate with source citation, etc.). Dr. Avakov's annual title, "Quality of Life, Balance of Powers, and Nuclear Weapons," gives a current snapshot of world economic and military statistics. This work, "Two Thousand Years of Economic Statistics," gives world population figures and current GDP data in a historical perspective.

Who's winning and who's losing? This book provides hard data for all who ponder the shifting sands of power, whether economic, military or demographic, and seek keys to decipher the media news. Going far beyond the major powers and the BRIC countries, this economic statistical work, issued every few years, presents historical statistics in nine sections.

This is Volume 2, which lists (1) Population/Growth Rates of Population by country, (2) GDP Per Capita/Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by country, and (3) GDP/Growth Rates of GDP by country.

Volume 1 (sold separately) covers: (1) Population by rank, (2) GDP Per Capita by rank, (3) GDP by rank, (4) Growth Rates of Population by rank, (5) Growth Rates of GDP Per Capita by rank, (6) Growth Rates of GDP by rank.

This biennial work contains data generally not available elsewhere, and in ways that help make it possible to draw useful comparisons.

First, it provides statistical data for all countries of the world (236 countries, within their 2011 borders) since the year 1950 (by decade, with 2011 in addition), plus forecasts for 2020 and 2030. Second, it provides data for 135 countries since the year 1000 (with data for 1000, 1500, 1600, 1700, 1820, 1870, 1880, 1890, 1900, 1913, 1920, 1929, and 1938). Third, it provides data for 134 countries for the first year AD.

In Volume 1 [572 pages], this data is arranged by rank, or size. In this, Volume 2 [438 pages], the countries are listed alphabetically.

This book is based on the groundbreaking works of Angus Maddison but it gives data up to the most recent year available and calculates GDP (gross and per capita) in the prices of that year.

For recent years, the World Bank, CIA, and Encyclopedia Britannica were principal sources. But, despite the author's great debt to these sources, the preponderance of data in the book is not direct citations from them but rather the result of calculations. Among other computational techniques he uses a new logarithmic interpolation which takes care of cross-country statistical distortions when calculating in the prices of the most recent year. For every line of data (for every country, each year), he provides a note on the technique used in obtaining his estimate (i.e., proxy, exponential interpolation, direct estimate with source citation, etc.).

Dr. Avakov's annual title, "Quality of Life, Balance of Powers, and Nuclear Weapons," gives a current snapshot of world economic and military statistics. This work, "Two Thousand Years of Economic Statistics," gives world population figures and current GDP data in a historical perspective.

What does it mean to live well? Every day we choose how to act, what to believe, and where to place our focus. This thoughtful book draws us into an engaging conversation about topics that we often leave unspoken but which wise people think through as a fundamental part of living. The mystery is really not so great: it is within reach all the time.

Debating the real meaning of strength, weakness, belief, doubt, intelligence, and judgement, we gain a deeper sense of these essential human qualities. Seemingly instinctive reactions like love, insight, even the build-up of habits, can be seen for the part they play in a well-constructed life.

The characters in this dialogue explore the dynamics between apparent opposites like action and self-control, youth and age, faith and knowing, the importance of role models and having someone who believes in you as you believe in them. Together, from the pragmatic perspective, the creative, and the contemplative facets of our personality, they build together a well-rounded understanding of the essence of wisdom as it applies to living our lives.

Following on from his The World Economy: a Millennial Perspective, published by the OECD in 2001, in this book, Angus Maddison offers a rare insight into the history and political influence of national accounts and national accounting.
How to sustain our world for future generations has perplexed us for centuries. We have reached a crossroads: we may choose the rocky path of responsibility or continue on the paved road of excess that promises hardship for our progeny. Independent efforts to resolve isolated issues are inadequate. Different from these efforts and from other books on the topic, this book uses systems thinking to understand the dominant forces that are shaping our hope for sustainability. It first describes a mental model - the bubble that holds our beliefs - that emerges from preponderant world views and explains current global trends. The model emphasizes economic growth and drives behavior toward short-term and self-motivated outcomes that thwart sustainability. The book then weaves statistical trends into a system diagram and shows how the economic, environmental, and societal contributors of sustainability interact. From this holistic perspective, it finds leverage points where actions can be most effective and combines eight areas of intervention into an integrated plan. By emphasizing both individual and collective actions, it addresses the conundrum of how to blend human nature with sustainability. Finally, it identifies primary three lessons we can learn by applying systems thinking to sustainability. Its metaphor-rich and accessible style makes the complex topic approachable and allows the reader to appreciate the intricate balance required to sustain life on Earth. Highlights the application of system thinking in economics Identifies systemic leveraging actions for achieving sustainability Outlines a comprehensive and integrated plan for achieving sustainable stewardship in the future
The World Economy brings together two reference works by Angus Maddison: The World Economy: A Millennial Perspective (2001) and The World Economy: Historical Statistics (2003). This new edition contains Statlinks, so that readers can access the underlying data in Excel format.

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