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This book provides a new study of Cold War airfields for all who study airfield history and archaeology.
This series of books provides a fresh user-friendly look at the military airfields of the British Isles. The series is split geographically, each book including a number of counties on a regional basis. Entries cover every military airfield within the counties, from WW1 to the present day and comprise: Brief history of the airfield, construction and use including decoy sites; Comprehensive list of flying units with dates and aircraft types; List of HQ units based at the airfield; Details of memorials; Maps and plans of almost every airfield; Location details; and a selection of period photographs. The first volume is dominated by the airfields built for the US 8th Army Air Force during WW2. These concrete airstrips played a vital part in the war effort. Today, most of the airfields lie abandoned, but some, like Marham, survive having been important Cold War bases.
For most British people the weekend of 27/28 October 1962 could so very easily have been their last weekend on earth, yet astonishingly the fact that Britain's nuclear deterrent forces went to an unprecedented level of readiness was kept secret from the public. Thor nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles stood on a round-the-clock wartime state of alert ready to be fired, these were the 'other' missiles of the Cuban Missile Crisis, which made Britain, in effect, America's launch pad. During the height of the crisis both RAF Bomber Command and the US Strategic Air Command were poised at the highest states of readiness. Both were ordered to a level of war readiness unparalleled throughout the whole of the forty years of Cold War. There is evidence to suggest that had the US needed to launch an air strike against Russian missiles in Cuba, President Kennedy might have been willing to absorb a Soviet nuclear assault on a NATO ally without retaliation, if it would have avoided escalation to World War Three. It is sobering to those who lived through that period that, the British Ambassador to Cuba commented: 'If it was a nuclear war we were headed for, Cuba was perhaps a better place to be than Britain!'
“Wartime airfields can be very atmospheric places. When you stand at Gransden Lodge at dusk, it’s very easy to imagine a huge Lancaster bomber taxying out onto a runway for takeoff...” Today, the peaceful countryside to the west of Cambridge is mainly given over to agriculture, but for several years in the mid-20th century, things were very different. Then, the area was dotted with airfields from which Allied aircraft flew to war – and one of these was Gransden Lodge. When the airfield first became operational, the units that were stationed there were involved in top-secret radar investigation and trials work, but within a year these units had moved away and the station became the base of the only Canadian squadron in the R.A.F.’s élite Pathfinder Force. It was later joined by another Pathfinder Force squadron, and together they flew many hazardous missions, in all weathers, against the Axis. After the war’s end, Gransden Lodge was briefly used by a unit that pioneered radar-assisted airborne mapping, and as a base for transport aircraft. It was subsequently the venue for some of the first post-war motor races in the U.K., and for many years before its decommissioning was under consideration as a Cold War base for American forces. In the early 1990s the wheel came full circle and flying began again, when Gransden Lodge became the home of one of Britain’s leading gliding clubs. Over the space of more than seventy years, Gransden Lodge has seen aviation in many forms, ranging from secret trials and heavy bomber operations to competitive gliding. World-renowned servicemen and scientists have passed through its gates, and many whose names are now almost forgotten lost their lives after taking off from its runways. Trials and Tribulation is the story of this historic airfield, and it will appeal to those interested in military and aviation history.
This second edition has been updated to take account of recent historical research into the period, including up-to-date interpretations relating to the Cuban Missile Crisis. The major issues surrounding the origins of the Cold War and its subsequent escalation into a global power struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union, are examined through an accessible narrative and comprehensive selection of sources. The author also provides an analysis of the extent to which the Cold War had an impact on America's political institutions and society. The revised study guides provide a firm basis for answering differentiated source-based and extended writing questions.
This book seeks to elucidate whether there are particular Christian perspectives on the role that Great Britain should play in the world today. It investigates the role that the Church of England has played in contemporary foreign policy issues: including the use of force - intervention, counter-terrorism and arms sales - and overseas trade, aid and debt forgiveness. The book brings together senior individuals from within the Church, academia and non-governmental organizations to investigate these various ethical dilemmas.
This is the changing story of Britain as it has been preserved in our fields, roads, buildings, towns and villages, mountains, forests and islands. From our suburban streets that still trace out the boundaries of long vanished farms to the Norfolk Broads, formed when medieval peat pits flooded, from the ceremonial landscapes of Stonehenge to the spread of the railways - evidence of how man's effect on Britain is everywhere. In The Making of the British Landscape, eminent historian, archaeologist and farmer, Francis Pryor explains how to read these clues to understand the fascinating history of our land and of how people have lived on it throughout time. Covering both the urban and rural and packed with pictures, maps and drawings showing everything from how we can still pick out Bronze Age fields on Bodmin Moor to how the Industrial Revolution really changed our landscape, this book makes us look afresh at our surroundings and really see them for the first time.

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