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From the New York Times bestselling author of Band of Brothers and D-Day, the definitive book on Lewis and Clark’s exploration of the Louisiana Purchase, the most momentous expedition in American history and one of the great adventure stories of all time. In 1803 President Thomas Jefferson selected his personal secretary, Captain Meriwether Lewis, to lead a voyage up the Missouri River to the Rockies, over the mountains, down the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean, and back. Lewis and his partner, Captain William Clark, made the first map of the trans-Mississippi West, provided invaluable scientific data on the flora and fauna of the Louisiana Purchase territory, and established the American claim to Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. Ambrose has pieced together previously unknown information about weather, terrain, and medical knowledge at the time to provide a vivid backdrop for the expedition. Lewis is supported by a rich variety of colorful characters, first of all Jefferson himself, whose interest in exploring and acquiring the American West went back thirty years. Next comes Clark, a rugged frontiersman whose love for Lewis matched Jefferson’s. There are numerous Indian chiefs, and Sacagawea, the Indian girl who accompanied the expedition, along with the French-Indian hunter Drouillard, the great naturalists of Philadelphia, the French and Spanish fur traders of St. Louis, John Quincy Adams, and many more leading political, scientific, and military figures of the turn of the century. High adventure, high politics, suspense, drama, and diplomacy combine with high romance and personal tragedy to make this outstanding work of scholarship as readable as a novel.
Explores the Lewis and Clark Expedition and how that event has sculpted societies, the sciences, and politics.
In America's early national period, Meriwether Lewis was a towering figure. Selected by Thomas Jefferson to lead the expedition to explore the Louisiana Purchase, he was later rewarded by Jefferson with the governorship of the entire Louisiana Territory. Yet within three years, plagued by controversy over administrative expenses, Lewis found his reputation and career in tatters. En route to Washington to clear his name, he died mysteriously in a crude cabin on the Natchez Trace in Tennessee. Was he a suicide, felled by his own alcoholism and mental instability? Most historians have agreed. Patricia Tyson Stroud reads the evidence to posit another, even darker, ending for Lewis. Stroud uses Lewis's find, the bitterroot flower, with its nauseously pungent root, as a symbol for his reputation as a purported suicide. It was this reputation that Thomas Jefferson promulgated in the memoir he wrote prefacing the short account of Lewis's historic expedition published five years after his death. Without investigation of any kind, Jefferson, Lewis's mentor from boyhood, reiterated undocumented assertions of Lewis's serious depression and alcoholism. That Lewis was the courageous leader of the first expedition to explore the continent from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean has been overshadowed by presuppositions about the nature of his death. Stroud peels away the layers of misinformation and gossip that have obscured Lewis's rightful reputation. Through a retelling of his life, from his resourceful youth to the brilliance of his leadership and accomplishments as a man, Bitterroot shows that Jefferson's mystifying assertion about the death of his protégé is the long-held bitter root of the Meriwether Lewis story.
The place was the vast unexplored western frontier of the United States. The time was 1804. The Lewis and Clark expedition set out and overcome the unknown to open the way for settlers to begin the westward expansion to the Pacific Ocean. Conceived by President Thomas Jefferson to explore the lands of the new Louisiana Purchase, the expedition also made many scientific and geographic observations. Author Judith Edwards highlights the extraordinary spirit of courage and cooperation that existed among the members of the famous expedition. This book is developed from LEWIS AND CLARK’S JOURNEY OF DISCOVERY IN AMERICAN HISTORY to allow republication of the original text into ebook, paperback, and trade editions.
Spur Award-winning author, Dale L. Walker continues what he started in Legends and Lies, by uncovering the truth around some of the American West's most famous and infamous figures. Leaving no figure sacred and no stone unturned, Walker dives deep into some of the most enduring myths and legends of the Old West: *What was the real story behind the death of Meriwether Lewis--suicicide or homicide? *Did Pat Garrett really kill Billy the Kid, or did the Kid fake his own death and live to a ripe old age? *What was the real relationship between Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane? *And who was the woman who claimed to have proof that she was their daughter? *Was Jack London killed or did he take his own life? *Who burned Wolf House to the ground? Asking these and many more questions, The Calamity Papers sheds some necessary light on our history by taking a closer look at some its heroes. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
The footsteps of Lewis and Clark changed history. In the early 1800s, after journeying over 8,000 miles on land and water, Lewis, Clark, and their Corps of Discovery found new plants, animals, people, and lands. Ordered by President Thomas Jefferson, they reached the Pacific Ocean before other explorers, claiming land west of the Mississippi River for the United States. Along the way, they encountered deadly grizzly bears, saw herds of buffalo, overcame starvation and freezing temperatures, lost their way in the woods, sought guidance from the Native Americans, portaged raging waterfalls, and even survived a stray bullet. Lewis and Clark opened travel to the west. America was growing, and these brave explorers led the way.
History--with the good bits put back. Discover the drama, discoveries, dirty deeds and derring-do that won the American West. With a storyteller's voice and attention to the details that make history real and interesting, Steve Sheinkin's Which Way to the Wild West? delivers America's greatest adventure. From the Louisiana Purchase (remember: if you're negotiating a treaty for your country, play it cool.) to the gold rush (there were only three ways to get to California--all of them bad) to the life of the cowboy, the Indian wars, and the everyday happenings that defined living on the frontier.

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