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This book examines issues related to the concepts of space, time and causality in the context of modern physics and ancient Indian traditions. It looks at the similarity and convergence of these concepts of modern physics with those discussed in ancient Indian wisdom. The volume brings the methodologies of empiricism and introspection together to highlight the synergy between these two strands. It discusses wide-ranging themes including the quantum vacuum as ultimate reality, quantum entanglement and metaphysics of relations, identity and individuality, and dark energy and anti-matter as discussed in physics and in Indian philosophical schools like Vedanta, Yoga, Buddhist, Kashmiri Shaivism and Jaina Philosophy. First of its kind, this book will be an essential read for scholars and researches of philosophy, Indian philosophy, philosophy of science, theoretical physics and social science.
"This book examines issues related with the concepts of space, time and causality in the context of modern physics and ancient Indian traditions. It looks at the similarity and convergence of these concepts of modern physics with those discussed in ancient Indian wisdom. The volume brings the methodologies of empiricism and introspection together to highlight the synergy among these two strands. It discusses wide-ranging themes including the quantum vacuum as ultimate reality; quantum entanglement and metaphysics of relations; identity and individuality; and, dark energy and anti-matter as discussed in physics and in Indian philosophical schools like Vedanta, Yoga, Buddhist, Kashmiri Shaivism and Jaina Philosophy. First of its kind, this book will be an essential read for scholars and researches of philosophy, Indian philosophy, philosophy of science, theoretical physics and social science"--
Space, Time and Causality An Essay in Natural Philosophy
Eleven of Graham Nerlich's essays are here brought together dealing with ontology and methodology in relativity; variable curvature and general relativity; and time and causation.
The Royal Institute of Philosophy has been sponsoring conferences in alter nate years since 1969. These have from the start been intended to be of interest to persons who are not philosophers by profession. They have mainly focused on interdisciplinary areas such as the philosophies of psychology, education and the social sciences. The volumes arising from these conferences have included discussions between philosophers and distinguished practitioners of other disciplines relevant to the chosen topic. Beginning with the 1979 conference on 'Law, Morality and Rights' and the 1981 conference on 'Space, Time and Causality' these volumes are now constituted as a series. It is hoped that this series will contribute to advancing philosophical understanding at the frontiers of philosophy and areas of interest to non-philosophers. It is hoped that it will do so by writing which reduces technicalities as much as the subject-matter permits. In this way the series is intended to demonstrate that philosophy can be clear and worthwhile in itself and at the same time relevant to the interests of lay people.
"Are things ugly or are they just not beautiful? The answer to this and many other questions can be found in this encyclopedia, the first large-scale comprehensive English-language reference on aesthetics and destined to be a classic in the field. Drawing from experts in the areas of philosophy, art, history, psychology, feminist theory, legal theory, and many more, the encyclopedia presents 600 signed essays alphabetically arranged. Most entries include a headnote clarifying the topic. Entries range from the philosophical essay on ugliness, to the more reality-based article on the impact of AIDS on the arts. Comprehensive coverage includes key figures, concepts, periods, theories, and movements in the history of aesthetics."--"Outstanding Reference Sources: the 1999 Selection of New Titles", American Libraries, May 1999. Comp. by the Reference Sources Committee, RUSA, ALA.
This book is the first comprehensive attempt to solve what Hartry Field has called "the central problem in the metaphysics of causation": the problem of reconciling the need for causal notions in the special sciences with the limited role of causation in physics. If the world evolves fundamentally according to laws of physics, what place can be found for the causal regularities and principles identified by the special sciences? Douglas Kutach answers this question by invoking a novel distinction between fundamental and derivative reality and a complementary conception of reduction. He then constructs a framework that allows all causal regularities from the sciences to be rendered in terms of fundamental relations. By drawing on a methodology that focuses on explaining the results of specially crafted experiments, Kutach avoids the endless task of catering to pre-theoretical judgments about causal scenarios. This volume is a detailed case study that uses fundamental physics to elucidate causation, but technicalities are eschewed so that a wide range of philosophers can profit. The book is packed with innovations: new models of events, probability, counterfactual dependence, influence, and determinism. These lead to surprising implications for topics like Newcomb's paradox, action at a distance, Simpson's paradox, and more. Kutach explores the special connection between causation and time, ultimately providing a never-before-presented explanation for the direction of causation. Along the way, readers will discover that events cause themselves, that low barometer readings do cause thunderstorms after all, and that we humans routinely affect the past more than we affect the future.
Finally, addressing the formidable difficulties posed for tensed accounts of time by the Special Theory of Relativity, he suggests that a modified version of the theory, compatible with the account of time in this book, is to be preferred to the standard version.
Causality - the concept of cause and effect - has long been viewed by philosophers, from Aristotle to Kant, as fundamental to our understanding of the universe. In this book we construct a theory of physics based on causality. We discover that the simplest causal network, based on Reichenbach's principle of common cause, exactly describes the Dirac equation and is consistent with both special relativity and quantum mechanical statistics. Are the "elementary" particles and "fundamental" laws of physics emergent from causality? Many historical philosophers would have perhaps taken this for granted and in this book we explore these ideas. Dr. Richard Bateson is a physicist based at the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN), University College London (UCL). He previously worked at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) and CERN. He has a doctorate in physics from Cambridge University.
Table of Contents 1: The Time Machine of Past Present and Future 2: Time Is Relative: Future, Past, Present Overlap and Exist Simultaneously 3: Time Dilation And The Contraction of Space Time 4: Twins, Time Travel, Gravity And Aging 5: Time Travel And Aging: Clocks, Gravity, Altitude, Longitude & Longevity 6: Acceleration, Light Speed, Time Travel, G-Forces And Fuel 7: The Curvature of Space-Time: Gravity and the Bending of Light and Time 8: The Circle of Time: In A Rotating Universe The Future Leads to the Past 9: Time Travel Through Black Holes in the Fabric of Space-Time 10: Microscopic Time Travel At the Speed of Light 11: "Worm Holes" In Extreme Curvatures of Space Time 12: Worm Holes, Negative Energy, Casimir Force And The Einstein-Rosen Bridge 13: Black Holes And Gravitational Sling Shots 14. The Time Traveler in Miniature: Negative Mass and Energy 15: Tachyons, Negative Energy, The Circle of Time: From the Future to the Past 16. Duality: The Past And Future In Parallel 17: The Mirror of Time: Red Shift, Blue Shifts and Duality 18. Into the Past: Duality, Anti-Matter and Conservation of Energy 19: Quantum Entanglement And Causality: The Future Effects the Past 20: Light, Wave Functions and the Uncertainty Principle: Changing the Future and the Past 21: Paradoxes of Time Travel and the Multiple Worlds of Quantum Physics 22. Epilogue: A Journey Though The Many Worlds of Time 23: References
Acquaints the specialist in relativity theory with some global techniques for the treatment of space-times and will provide the pure mathematician with a way into the subject of general relativity.
Space, Time and the Proposition includes the full transcript of Anderson's lectures given in 1944 on Samuel Alexander's book Space Time and Deity. This lecture series is generally considered essential to an understanding of Anderson's thought. John Anderson was Challis Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sydney and taught at the university from 1927 until 1958. He died at his Sydney home in 1962.
Using a series of easy-to-follow diagrams and elementary geometry, this visual guide to Einstein's Theory of Relativity explores fundamental concepts such as simultaneity, causality, and time dilation.
The traditional topics of the "philosophy of nature" — space, time, causality, the structure of the universe — are overwhelmingly present in our modern scientific theories. This book traces the complex paths that discussion of these topics has followed, from Plato and Aristotle, through Descartes, Leibniz, Kant and other great thinkers, right up to the relativistic cosmologies and the grand unified theories of contemporary science. In the light of this historical development, it becomes clear that modern science gives us not only a technological power over the world, but also a deeper understanding of physical reality. In this sense, science could be regarded as an heir to the traditional "philosophy of nature". Moreover, the reader will learn why science itself deserves to be the subject of philosophical reflection.

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