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The Sweet family have run the local bakery for as long as anyone can remember. Twins Ruby and Mary Sweet help their widowed father out when they can. Mary loves baking and has no intention of leaving their small Gloucestershire village. While Ruby dreams of life in London. But as war threatens there will be changes for all of the Sweet family with brother Charlie off to serve and cousin Frances facing evacuation. But there will be opportunities too, as the twins’ baking talent catches the attention of the Ministry of Food...
What do you do if a tidal wave of debt threatened to engulf you and your loved one? Would you take a lifeline if you knew the risks that came with it? Would your conscience let you accept? The Making of an S.S. G.I.T is a novel set in a time when the government is losing seven billion pounds a year through copious fraudulent claims made on Social Security resources. As a dedicated member of the public you can pick up the phone, dial the designated number and report to the anonymous recipient at the end of the line what you suspect of your neighbours’ or friends’ shady activities. Freephone of course. But would you?This is the choice Ron must make. Ron comes from an unhappy, deprived background. He was job hunting in the worst UK recession, and becoming resigned to drawing his social security cheque forever. Until he met the beautiful Lucy. As well as love, a love he’d never had from his parents, she helped him find his first job. Restoring his sense of self-worth, their life becomes idyllic – he has love, he has a purpose. But trouble was waiting just around the corner and with it comes the hard choices that Ron and Lucy must make if they are to protect their hard won existence. The Making of an S.S. G.I.T is a topical novel, full of humour and closely observed characters.
How did cranes come to symbolize matrimonial happiness? Why were magpies the only creatures that would not go inside Noah's Ark? Birds and bird imagery are integral parts of our language and culture. With her remarkable ability to dig up curious and captivating facts, Diana Wells hatches a treat for active birders and armchair enthusiasts alike. Meet the intrepid adventurers and naturalists who risked their lives to describe and name new birds. Learn the mythical stories of the gods and goddess associated with bird names. Explore the avian emblems used by our greatest writers--from Coleridge's albatross in "The Ancient Mariner" to Poe's raven. A sampling of the bird lore you'll find inside: Benjamin Franklin didn't want the bald eagle on our National Seal because of its "bad moral character," (it steals from other birds); he lobbied for the turkey instead. Chaffinches, whose Latin name means "unmarried," are called "bachelor birds" because they congregate in flocks of one gender. Since mockingbirds mimic speech, some Native American tribes fed mockingbird hearts to their children, believing it helped them learn language. A group of starlings is called a murmuration because they chatter so when they roost in the thousands. Organized alphabetically, each of these bird tales is accompanied by a two-color line drawing. Dip into 100 Birds and you'll never look at a sparrow, an ostrich, or a wren in quite the same way.
From the national bestselling author of Bad Things Happen—the debut that Stephen King called a “great f***ing book”—comes a new crime novel that will blow readers away… ANTHONY LARK has a list of names—Terry Dawtrey, Sutton Bell, Henry Kormoran. To his eyes, the names glow red on the page. They move. They breathe. The men on the list were once involved in a notorious robbery. And now Lark is hunting them, and he won’t stop until every one of them is dead. DAVID LOOGAN—editor of the mystery magazine Gray Streets—is living a quiet life in Ann Arbor, Michigan, with Detective ELIZABETH WAISHKEY and her daughter. But soon David and Elizabeth are drawn into Lark’s violent world. As Elizabeth works to track Lark down, David befriends Lucy Navarro, a reporter with a crazy theory about the case that threatens to implicate some very powerful people. And when Lucy disappears, David decides her theory may not be so crazy after all
The Golden Age of British Detective Fiction The idyllic English village of Lindsay Carfax isn’t run by the parish council, the rating authority, the sanitary inspector nor the local cops as you might suppose. The real bosses are the Carders – something to do with wool, four hundred years back. They wound stuff on cards, I suppose. But these boys are very fly customers – they’re right on the ball. Boiled down, it comes to this; they’re a syndicate who run this place – which makes a packet – with their own rules. One way and another they probably own most of it.” Thus ruminated Superintendent Charles Luke to Albert Campion who was contemplating visiting his wayward artistic niece in Carfax. And when a missing schoolteacher reappeared after nine days, and Campion’s car was “inadvertently” damaged, not to mention Campion himself, then all the signs were that not all was what it seemed. Campion himself plays the central role in this quintessentially British mystery, but there are appearances too from all of Margery Allingham’s regular characters, from Luke to Campion’s former manservant Lugg, to his wife Lady Amanda Fitton and others. The dialogue is sharp and witty, the observation keen, and the climax is thrilling and eerily atmospheric.

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