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An evocative account of fourteen European kingdoms-their rise, maturity, and eventual disappearance. There is something profoundly romantic about lost civilizations. Europe's past is littered with states and kingdoms, large and small, that are scarcely remembered today, and while their names may be unfamiliar-Aragon, Etruria, the Kingdom of the Two Burgundies-their stories should change our mental map of the past. We come across forgotten characters and famous ones-King Arthur and Macbeth, Napoleon and Queen Victoria, right up to Stalin and Gorbachev-and discover how faulty memory can be, and how much we can glean from these lost empires. Davies peers through the cracks in the mainstream accounts of modern-day states to dazzle us with extraordinary stories of barely remembered pasts, and of the traces they left behind. This is Norman Davies at his best: sweeping narrative history packed with unexpected insights. Vanished Kingdoms will appeal to all fans of unconventional and thought-provoking history, from readers of Niall Ferguson to Jared Diamond.
Written by the Professor of History at the University of NSW and well-known author of TThe Irish in Australia,' this book is a study from an historical and personal perspective of the Irish immigrant experience in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing particularly on the early years of this century, the author attempts to present Irish migration in all of its drama, colour and humour. Contains many evocative illustrations, a bibliography and an index.
Edited and Essay by Mabel H. Cabot. Preface by Rubie Watson.
Written by the Professor of History at the University of NSW and well-known author of TThe Irish in Australia,' this book is a study from an historical and personal perspective of the Irish immigrant experience in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing particularly on the early years of this century, the author attempts to present Irish migration in all of its drama, colour and humour. Contains many evocative illustrations, a bibliography and an index.
The fascinating history of a Baltic empire’s dominance and decline—excerpted from internationally bestselling author Norman Davies’s Vanished Kingdoms Vanished Kingdoms introduces readers to once-powerful European empires that have left scant traces on the modern map. In this excerpt from his widely acclaimed book, Norman Davies tells the ill-fated story of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Founded in the mid-thirteenth century in one of the continent’s first settled regions, where the oldest of its Indo-European languages is spoken, the Grand Duchy at its peak was the largest country in Europe, stretching from the Baltic to the Black Sea, and it commanded yet greater influence after uniting with its western neighbor, the Kingdom of Poland, to form the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The Grand Duchy’s huge territory included the great cities of Kiev, Vilnius, Riga, Minsk, and Brest. Despite being ahead of its time as an elective republic in an age of absolute monarchy, power struggles and foreign incursions led to its ultimate demise and forced partition by Russia, Prussia, and Austria in 1795. In this selection from a work The Boston Globe has called “commendably accessible, magisterial, and uncommonly humane,” Davies chronicles these rich yet unfamiliar chapters in the history of modern Lithuania, Belarus, and Latvia with his signature acuity and verve.
The history of contemporary Ireland and its struggle for independence—excerpted from internationally bestselling author Norman Davies’s Vanished Kingdoms Vanished Kingdoms introduces readers to once-powerful European empires that have left scant traces on the modern map. In this excerpt from his widely acclaimed book, Norman Davies chronicles the history of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland during what is referred to as the Era of National Liberation. Beginning with the Easter Rising of 1916, Davies recounts the difficulties of establishing Home Rule, which would allow for autonomous self-government under the British Crown, and the impact of the IRA and its fraught relationship with the Catholic Church. Along the way, Davies includes stirring portraits of the groundbreaking leaders who fought for Irish independence, such as Eamon de Valera and his organization Sinn Fein, and the well-known songs and poems that helped galvanize a sense of national pride. A selection from the work The Boston Globe has called “commendably accessible, magisterial, and uncommonly humane,” The Battle for Ireland provides a concise overview of modern Irish politics and history with Davies’s characteristic vigor and intelligence.
Combining armchair travel, stunning photography, and a keen historical sense, James Charles Roy takes us on a moving journey through the tragic past, present, and, very likely, future of Eastern Europe.

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