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As legions of businesses scramble to set up virtual-shop, we face an unprecedented level of competition to win over and keep new customers online. At the forefront of this battleground is your ability to connect with your customers, nurture your relationships and understand the psychology behind what makes them click. In this book The Web Psychologist, Nathalie Nahai, expertly draws from the worlds of psychology, neuroscience and behavioural economics to bring you the latest developments, cutting edge techniques and fascinating insights that will lead to online success. Webs of Influence delivers the tools you need to develop a compelling, influential and profitable online strategy which will catapult your business to the next level – with dazzling results.
With the majority of commercial transaction now happening online, companies of all shapes and sizes face an unprecedented level of competition to win over and retain new business. In this second edition of Webs of Influence, Nathalie Nahai brings together the latest insights from the world of psychology, neuroscience and behavioural economics to explain the underlying dynamics and motivations behind consumer behaviour. This book will show you how to apply specific principles to improve your marketing, products and websites, enabling you to engage with your customers in a more meaningful way.
This six- or twelve-week study for individuals or groups provides practical, biblical ways to take advantage of the web of influence that develops through each person's mosaic of relationships. Such a web may be used to influence people for Christ. Includes leader's guide. The first book in the Walking With the Word series.
Countless public health agencies are trying to solve our most intractable public health problems -- among them, the obesity and opioid epidemics -- by partnering with corporations responsible for creating or exacerbating those problems. We are told industry must be part of the solution. But is it time to challenge the partnership paradigm and the popular narratives that sustain it? In The Perils of Partnership, Jonathan H. Marks argues that public-private partnerships and multi-stakeholder initiatives create "webs of influence" that undermine the integrity of public health agencies; distort public health research and policy; and reinforce the framing of public health problems and their solutions in ways that are least threatening to the commercial interests of corporate "partners". We should expect multinational corporations to develop strategies of influence -- but public bodies can and should develop counter-strategies to insulate themselves from corporate influence in all its forms. Marks reviews the norms that regulate public-public interactions (separation of powers) and private-private interactions (antitrust and competition law), and argues for an analogous set of norms to govern public-private interactions. He also offers a novel framework to help public bodies identify the systemic ethical implications of their current or proposed relationships with industry actors. Marks makes a compelling case that the default public-private interaction should be at arm's length: separation, not collaboration. He calls for a new paradigm that avoids the perils of corporate influence and more effectively protects and promotes public health. The Perils of Partnership is essential reading for public health officials and policymakers -- but anyone interested in public health will recognize the urgency of this book.
Since Alexis de Tocqueville's seminal work on American democracy, no one has attempted to diagnose the current state of democracy in the United States. This book is a modest attempt to do such an update, based on both democratic theory and the author's actual practice in governing one city (Miami) for three terms. As with De Tocqueville, Suarez reports from his perspective as an immigrant, but also from the perspective of a trial lawyer, college professor and politician with half a century of being fully immersed in the American experience.
Jon Lendon offers a new interpretation of how the Roman empire worked in the first four centuries AD. A despotism rooted in force and fear enjoyed widespread support among the ruling classes of the provinces on the basis of an aristocratic culture of honour shared by rulers and ruled. Thecompetitive Roman and Greek aristocrats of the empire conceived of their relative standing in terms of public esteem or honour, and conceived of their cities - towards which they felt a warm patriotism - as entities locked in a parallel struggle for primacy in honour over rivals. Emperors andprovincial governors exploited these rivalries to gain the indispensable co-operation of local magnates by granting honours to individuals and their cities. Since rulers strove for honour as well, their subjects manipulated them with honours in their turn. Honour - whose workings are also traced inthe Roman army - served as a way of talking and thinking about Roman government: it was both a species of power, and a way - connived in by rulers and ruled - of concealing the terrible realities of imperial rule.
Reading about leadership is like walking through dense forest. The literature goes in so many different directions a person can become lost. As a result, leadership studies struggles for academic credibility while it tries to bring some kind of order to this fascinating, complex, and important social phenomenon.

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