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Book In the second edition of this renowned book, you will find pearls of wisdom, heartfelt advice, and inspiration from one of the nation’s leading authorities on staff motivation, teacher leadership, and principal effectiveness. With wit and understanding, Todd Whitaker describes the beliefs, behaviors, attitudes, and interactions of great teachers and explains what they do differently. New features include: Meaning what you say Focusing on students first Putting yourself in their position DVD Bundle This bundle includes a DVD featuring Todd Whitaker speaking about what great teachers do differently. It runs for approximately two hours and is the perfect addition to teacher training events and professional development meetings/workshops. Filled with pearls of wisdom, humor, and practical strategies, the video will motivate your staff and inspire them to be the best they can, each and every day. The DVD comes with a free copy of What Great Teachers Do Differently as well as a Facilitator's Guide.
This book examines the critical role that teachers play in supporting at-risk student populations to stay in school and successfully complete their graduation requirements. Thompson addresses how high schools may support marginal students in achieving success by the implementation of teacher self-efficacy and a positive classroom environment.
Our fourth book in the International Research on School Leadership series focuses on school leadership in an era of high stakes accountability. Fueled by sweeping federal education accountability reforms, such as the United States’ No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and Race to the Top (R2T) and Australia’s Performance Measurement and Reporting Taskforce, school systems around the world are being forced to increase academic standards, participate in highstakes testing, and raise evaluation standards for teachers and principals. These resultsdriven reforms are intended to hold educators “accountable for student learning and accountable to the public” (Anderson, 2005, p. 2, emphasis in original). While policymakers and the public debate the merits of student achievement accountability measures, P12 educational leaders do not have the luxury to wait for clear guidance and resources to improve their schools and operating systems. Instead, successful leaders must balance the need to create learning communities, manage the organizational climate, and encourage community involvement with the consequences testing has on teacher morale and public scrutiny. The chapters in this volume clearly indicate that as school leaders attend to these potentially competing forces, this affects their problemsolving strategies, ability to facilitate change, and encourage community involvement. We were delighted with the responses from colleagues around the world who were eager to share their research dealing with how leaders are functioning effectively within a highaccountability environment. The nine chapters in this volume provide empirical evidence of the strategies school leaders use to cope with problems and negotiate external demands while improving student performance. In particular, the voices and actions of principals, superintendents, and school board members are captured in a blend of quantitative and qualitative studies. The breadth of studies is impressive, ranging from case studies of individual principals to crossdistrict comparisons to national data from the National Center for Education Statistics. To highlight important findings, we have organized the book into five sections. The first section (Chapters 2, 3, and 4) highlights the problemsolving strategies used by principals and superintendents when pressured to turn around lowperforming schools. In the second section (Chapters 5 and 6), attention is devoted to ways in which school leaders act as “buffers” by reducing the impact of external demands within their local school contexts. Next, Chapters 7 and 8 explore creative ways in which financial analyses can be used to assess the cost effectiveness of programs and services. Chapters 9 and 10 examine how principals enact their instructional leadership roles in managing curriculum reforms and evaluating teachers. Finally, in the last section (Chapter 11), Kenneth Leithwood synthesizes the major themes and ideas emerging across these chapters, paying particular attention to practical issues influencing school leaders in this era of school reform and accountability as well as promising areas for future research.
Get the fuel you need to drive collaborative leadership in your school! What type of leadership do you practice? Many of us rely on transformational and instructional leadership. But there are advantages in applying a holistic angle including all stakeholders—an approach known as collaborative leadership. Peter DeWitt unpacks six factors framed through John Hattie’s research while painting a powerful scheme: meet stakeholders where they are, motivate stakeholders to strive for improvement, model how to do it. The blueprint will inspire you to: Transform your leadership practice Identify where you can make changes Build and empower your team Incorporate all stakeholders into the conversation
Although cultural issues have a powerful influence on the failure and success of mentoring programs and relationships, there is scant research on this area and little in the way of guidelines that practitioners can use to help assure mentoring success. This book seeks to expand our knowledge and understanding of this topic and to foster the use of this information to enhance practice and research. The book is unique in a number of ways and will be an important resource for all those engaged in mentoring endeavors and for those conducting research in this area. First, it presents research findings on the cultural impact of mentoring at the individual relational level, at the organizational level, and within the structures of the society. Secondly, the chapters describe mentoring from an international perspective including programs from Africa, Australia, Canada, Finland, India, Ireland, Korea, Scotland, Sweden and the United States. Third, the book is research based and yet, can be easily applied to practice. Chapters provide information on lessons learned and also include reflective questions to enable the reader to delve more deeply into the constructs and findings in order to apply them to their own practice and research. This makes the book an ideal resource for training mentors and mentees, for designing mentoring programs, for teaching about mentoring, and for establishing and maintaining mentoring relationships. It also will be of value to those who are engaged in conducting research on how to create and maintain successful mentoring relationships and programs. Endorsements All mentoring relationships are diverse. Indeed, it is the difference between mentor and mentee that creates the potential for colearning. Mentoring that bridges cultural gaps opens the way to an exchange of understanding about both internal and external assumptions and perspectives (how each of us thinks and how the world functions for each of us). In this book, the editors and contributors demonstrate the diversity of diversity, with particular focus on education in different societies. I recommend it as essential background reading for anyone designing mentoring programmes, in which cultural diversity will be a significant dynamic. Dr David Clutterbuck, Special Ambassador, European Mentoring and Coaching Council In this boundaryspanning volume, the authors pull back the curtain on the latest evolution of mentoring theory and practice revealing that all mentoring relationships are intrinsically cultural. Not only that, the researchers present creative, empirically sound ideas for mentoring at different scales—personal encounters, networked communities, and loose collectives. This book is robustly inclusive of structural layers of mentoring differentiated by context—whether higher education, schools, or collegial communities—making meaning of cultural diversity as part of one’s inner core of relational and systematic mentoring. Practitioners of mentoring and researchers of mentoring alike should find this work important for understanding the breadth and depth of mentoring in different cultural contexts while allowing its essence to remain unfolding, rather than simply told. All mentoring professionals can gain insight and value from the diversity of theoretical orientations that capture as well as map the impact of global and cultural influences of mentoring in everyday worlds. A must read for all who care about the quality of educational relationships and about making a difference in learning settings. ~ Dr. Carol A. Mullen, Professor of Educational Leadership, Virginia Tech, University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) Plenary Session Representative (PSR)

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