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What ’s Age Got to Do with It? ABSOLUTELY NOTHING! Though it’s her husband, Dr. Phil, who has his own nationally-syndicated talk show, Robin McGraw’s appearances on the show draw thousands of questions from viewers of all ages who want to know how she looks and feels so fabulous at the age of fifty-five. In What’s Age Got to Do with It? Robin shares her journey, including the ups and downs, and the secrets for staying healthy and in shape. She also provides insider information from a panel of top experts in the areas of fitness, nutrition, skin care, menopause, hair, makeup, and fashion. Included in this two-in-one book, is the highly practical and actionable companion book Robin McGraw’s Complete Makeover Guide, which helps women apply Robin’s powerful insights in their everyday lives. Robin says, “To me, aging gracefully isn’t accepting what aging does to you. It means taking care of your health, wanting to look your best, and knowing that it is not conceited, egotistical, or selfish to do so.” ROBIN McGRAW, wife of best-selling author and television talk show host Dr. Phil McGraw, has made “family first” a priority in her life. Married for more than thirty years to Dr. Phil, Robin has made her marriage and raising their two sons, Jay and Jordan, her priority in life. A constant presence on the Dr. Phil show since the first episode, viewers worldwide have embraced Robin—whether she’s discussing her experiences as a mother and wife or dealing with issues that women face in the many phases of their lives.
If you think that being old is about having a rocking chair and an easy life style, think again. You’re looking through the binoculars backwards. What’s Age Got To Do With It? turns the lenses the right way around and gives a clear, Scriptural view of God’s purpose for old age. When He created the universe, God set in motion times and seasons and the ageing process. Old age was part of His plan from the beginning – that people should ripen to maturity, developing wisdom through a lifetime of experience and relationship with Him, eventually enriching others with attributes that have been honed over lifetimes. But instead of contributing as God intended, many see themselves as “useless” and are afraid of being a burden. Ageism has destroyed their self-image and expectations, and they give up and become passive – and we are all the losers. Here are stories of many people living full, purpose-driven lives well into their 90s and even 100s. For example, you’ll meet the lay preacher who wrote a book at 100 years of age because he couldn’t stand long enough to preach, and the 95-year-old who organized more Christian support from local churches for his care home, as well as many ordinary people who are making a difference to the lives of those around them. What’s Age Got To Do With It? shows how to take off the reins and live the way God intended from the beginning.
Age, as an embodied identity and as an organizing principle, has received scant attention in organization studies. There is a lack of critical appreciation of how age plays out in organizational settings, the material and discursive dynamics of age practices, how age discourses impact on the body, and how age and ageing intersect with other identity categories. This is curious since age works as a master signifier in contemporary society and is something that affects us all. In this introductory essay, we show how the papers in this special issue redress this lacuna by enhancing and challenging what we know about age and organizations. We also set out an agenda for stimulating research conversations to bring an age-sensitive lens to organizational analysis. We structure our analysis around two focal points: age as an embodied identity, and the symbolic meanings of age within organizing practices. In doing so, we aim to provide a catalyst not only for research on age in organizations but also about the aged nature of organizing.
Andrea Camilleri's sensational Inspector Montalbano continues in the fourteenth instalment, The Age of Doubt. A chance encounter with a strange young woman leads Inspector Montalbano to Vigàta harbour – and into a puzzling new mystery. The crew of a mysterious yacht – the Vanna – due to dock in the area have discovered a corpse floating in the water, the dead man's face badly disfigured. It isn't long before Montalbano begins to become suspicious of the Vanna's inhabitants. Who is the yacht's owner, the glamorous and short-tempered Livia Giovannini? How has she accrued her riches? And why does she spend so much time at sea? Meanwhile Montalbano finds himself getting into tangles with the dreaded Commissioner, the exasperating Dr Lattes and a very beautiful young woman at the harbour, with whom he becomes dangerously besotted . . . Can the Inspector clear his head long enough to unravel this murky mystery? The Age of Doubt is followed by The Dance of the Seagull, the fifteenth book in the series.
Due to improvements in health and healthcare, the elderly population is expanding rapidly within the developed world. However, more and more elderly people require some form of psychological support at some point in their later years. The types of problems faced by this population are quite distinct and often more complex than those faced by younger adults, and throw up many new challenges - in both assessment and treatment. Though there are books available that focus individually on assessment or treatment, few have combined the two into a single framework. Within this book Knight and Pachana argue that psychological assessment needs to be more tightly integrated with therapy, especially with older adult clients. Using the Contextual Adult Lifespan Theory for Adapting Psychotherapy (CALTAP) as a framework for applying our knowledge about developmental, social contextual, and cohort/generational factors that influence age differences in response to psychological assessment and therapy, they present an integrated framework for psychological assessment and therapy with older adults. This text is valuable for practitioners looking for a solid theoretical basis for the practice of assessment and therapy with older clients, students in graduate courses looking at later lifespan issues, and educators looking for material to enhance generalist psychotherapy courses with a lifespan perspective.

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