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SHE FINALLY THOUGHT SHE WAS SAFE... Toni Maguire, author of Don't Tell Mummy, takes up the story of her tragic childhood where she left off, revealing the awful truth about what happened when her father, sent to jail for abusing her, was released, and came home...
Gia loves her daddy. When he comes home from work, he gives her big hugs, swings her in circles, and even calls her his princess! When her daddy is called to serve his country in Iraq and Afghanistan, Gia talks to him on the computer, helps bake him cookie care packages, and waits for the day he can come home. But when her daddy finally returns from his war experiences with the wounds of a warrior, Gia and her family soon discover that even though life is different, everything is still alright. When Daddy Comes Home shares a poignant story for children of a soldiers journey to and from war as the family who loves him learns to open their hearts to change in the most positive light.
World War II was coming to a close in Europe and Richard Haney was only four years old when the telegram arrived at his family's home in Janesville, Wisconsin. That moment, when Haney learned of his father's death in the final months of fighting, changed his and his mother's lives forever. In this emotionally powerful book, Haney, now a professional historian, explores the impact of war on an American family. Unlike many of America's 183,000 World War II orphans, Richard Haney has vivid memories of his father. He skillfully weaves together those memories with his parents' wartime letters and his mother's recollections to create a unique blend of history and memoir. Through his father's letters he reveals the war's effect on a man who fought in the Battle of the Bulge with the 17th Airborne but wanted nothing more than to return home, a man who expressed the feelings of thousands when he wrote to his wife, "I've seen and been through a lot but want to forget it all as soon as I can." Haney illuminates life on the home front in small-town America as well, describing how profoundly the war changed such communities. At the same time, his memories of an idyllic family life make clear what soldiers like Clyde Haney felt they were defending. With "When Is Daddy Coming Home?", Richard Haney makes an exceptional contribution to the literature on the Greatest Generation - one that is both devastatingly personal and representative of what families all over America endured during that testing time. No one who reads this powerful story will come away unmoved.
The deeply shocking story of a mother's neglect and a father's betrayal Sally East's heartwrenching story starts when she was only three. It was then that her father first touched her inappropriately, as he started to groom her for the future. Sally's mother, a woman who suffered from manic depression, neglected her on her 'bad days', as Sally called them. She would turn her face to the wall and ignore her small daughter. But Sally loved her mother and waited for the 'good days' to return. When she was only six, Sally's mother died. Then when Sally most needed to feel secure, safe and loved, she paid a price that nearly destroyed her: with his wife dead, Sally's father felt free to abuse his daughter whenever he wished. The conflict of wanting to be cared for by the same person who was violating her sowed the seeds of self loathing - something that would haunt her for many years to come until the death of her father. Now in a supportive relationship and with two children of her own, Sally has at last found happiness. Bestselling author Toni Maguire not only puts a voice to Sally's heart-rending story but shows the long-term damage that child abuse does.
Fatherhood is, by nature, the basis of every relationship with males in a persons life. For boys, a father is the hero through whom they learn about manhood. For girls, a father is the model of man they are going to look up to when they choose a husband. Too often, many children deal with the problem of absentee fathers and a lack of suitable role models. In When is Daddy Coming?, author Ofelia Perez shares how parents can help their children and break the cycle of fatherlessness. She: discusses the social and individual roots of the problem; offers useful and down-to-earth forms of avoiding and solving for everyone: dads, married moms and dads, and divorced couples; conveys the message of dealing with the situation individually, but asserts there is responsibility of the church and judicial system; and aims to help fathers feel proud of being fathers and helps mothers to take steps for balance. When is Daddy Coming? maintains that men must take charge of fatherhood with all its rewards and responsibilities. They must train themselves and make themselves savvy about the matter so families can be saved.
A painfully honest story of human weakness and God's unending forgiveness. Thirteen years ago, amidst scandal, sin, and shattered lives, Michael English fell from the pinnacle of the Christian music world. In 1994, newspapers around the world blared the headline, "Gospel Singer Named Artist of the Year Turns in His Awards After Confirming He Had an Affair with a Fellow Married Singer." From 1994 to 2002 Michael English's life went from bad to worse. Public shame, divorce, broken relationships, drug addiction, even homelessness. But in 2002, God reached out and rescued Michael from himself. Today Michael is whole again, and in this book he tells his story of redemption.
Every family has its secrets, but some are worse than others. ‘I had learnt to switch myself off from feeling anything when he molested me. Just lie there like a wooden doll and don’t give him the satisfaction of allowing one whimper to leave your mouth.’ Lynn’s mother wanted the world to see the perfect family. An immaculate house, three well-dressed children and a charming husband. But behind closed doors it was a different story. Abused by her father from when she was just a baby, Lynn would scream for her mother, who ignored the little girl’s cries. Nothing was going to shatter her perfect life. Threatened by their parents, Lynn and her brother never told anyone in fear of being separated, but the trauma of their past followed them throughout their lives, with devastating consequences. Now as Lynn tries to piece together and come to terms with her past as an adult, she discovers she wasn’t the only one with a secret.
'Lying in the prison of my bed, his dark silhouette closes in, a pillow in his hands. My throat tightens in fear...’ At the tender age of five, Madeleine was living a daily nightmare. In a dark, grey building on Jersey, she was just another orphan, defenceless and alone. She was also an easy target. Unbeknownst to the outside world, the care home manager was abusing her, using her like she was his toy. “Say nothing, no one will believe a nasty little kid like you,” he’d whisper. Terrified, Madeleine would keep quiet. And, worse still, the home was selling the children to men who would inflict on them the worst possible abuse. No one cared. This is Madeleine’s heart-breaking story and her fight to survive.
Why Daddy Hits Mommy. When dad comes home he wants 2 thinks. A whiskey drink and spotless sinks. Even though your mommy works too. Dad's domestic labor expectations are askew. Once daddy enjoys drinky three. It's time for you and mom to flee. To grandmas house, you'd better go. Or mom will suffer several blows. To the face is where daddy hits. Because he drinks and cannot quits. Please remember dad is sick. Even when he uses a stick. Alcohol is daddy's crutch. And that's why he hits mom too much.
Robert Harlow is one of Canadas best kept literary secrets. A noted craftsman, he is also one its finest story-tellers. Born in northern British Columbia, he was a military pilot for a number of years, later a student at the Iowa Writers Workshop, then a producer and director for a decade-and-a-half at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation before joining the faculty of The University of British Columbia. He now lives and writes on one of the Gulf Islands off Canadas southwest coast.
Unlike people with carefree previous lives, I packed away my past. There are some memories labelled 'Look at', and others 'Leave well alone'... Emily Smith was held in a prison of fear for ten years. When she was four, her father left and a new man was brought into her life. He loved her, he kept telling her so, but the emotional and physical abuse she suffered at his hands were a daily nightmare. Until one day, after he crept into her bedroom, her life became unbearable. Emily found she was different in another way as her autism became more noticeable and punishments for her 'abnormal' behaviour more severe. Astonishingly, she managed to escape her home of hell, where she was abused right in front of her mother. Emily determinedly gained a university place and emerged triumphant with a new life and family in Ireland, desperate to treat her daughter, so similar to her, to a different life. Heartbreakingly true, Silent Child is a testament to Emily's strength as she sheds light on rampant abuse still happening today. Powerful and shocking, sharing her story means she finally has a voice to say: enough.
A New York Times Notable Book of the Year When Marion Winik fell in love with Tony Heubach during a wild Mardi Gras in New Orleans, her friends shook their heads. For starters, she was straight and he was gay. But Marion and Tony's impossible love turned out to be true enough to produce a marriage and two beautiful sons, true enough to weather drug addiction, sexual betrayal, and the AIDS that would kill Tony at the age of thirty-seven, twelve years after they met. In a memoir heartbreaking and hilarious by turns, Marion Winik tells a story that is all more powerful for the way in which it defies easy judgments. As it charts the trajectory of a marriage so impossible that it became inevitable, First Comes Love reminds us—poignantly indelibly—that every story is a special case.
Abused, unloved and alone. Can't Anyone Help Me? is the shocking true story by Toni Maguire. Jackie was an unwanted child. So unwanted that her mother regularly left Jackie at her uncle's house. Which was when the nightmare started. For when his wife went out, her uncle's friends came round. He had a Special Room. In it Jackie was tied up and molested, beaten, burnt by cigarettes and urinated on. Sometimes other children were brought along. Jackie got to know the Special Room intimately. Jackie could never bring herself to tell her mother. She ended up in a home for disturbed children. She ran away, and a life of homelessness, drugs, prostitution and psychiatric wards followed. Eventually, Jackie sought help. But could she turn her life around? Would her evil uncle and his Special Room haunt her forever? Can't Anyone Help Me? by Toni Maguire is the inspirational story of struggle and survival against all odds as one young woman attempts to put her torturous past behind her and make a future for herself. Toni Maguire is the author of four bestselling books: Don't Tell Mummy, When Daddy Comes Home,Nobody Came and Helpless.
Two 1950s Mississippi families struggle with gay issues. Sid Hodges and JB Day were forced to flee the Deep South almost at gun point, and under threat of lynching. Eventually, they end up in San Franciso, living through the Stonewall riots and other great social upheavals of the 1960s. Later, Sid's son, Steven, who comes out of the closet at that very time, joins them. "Daddy, Can I Borrow Your Purse?" is a funny, evocative, and touching story told in fine old South tradition with a West Coast Zing! It is populated by a cast of real characters that you'll never forget.
Why do American husbands come home from work too exhausted to interact with their families? When did a healthy quest for prosperity become a twisted game no one can win? How did BlackBerries and internet porn become more interesting to men than their flesh-and-blood spouses? Shmuley Boteach has made a great study of how families live today—both in his work as a rabbi privately and as host of TLC's "Shalom in the Home". He's discovered a disturbing common thread in the families he meets: men responding to the pressure of competition in their work lives by turning away from their loved ones. In a world that judges men by the size of their paychecks and the wattage of their fame, it's all too easy to lose sight of what is truly valuable in life. Men who consider themselves failures and don't love themselves turn into stressed-out dads, distracted husbands and miserable human beings. For these men, alcohol, the internet and sporting events serve as numbing stand-ins for read life. In THE BROKEN AMERICAN MALE, Boteach doesn't just outline the problems facing marriages and nuclear families. He also offers practical, inspiring solutions, showing how wives can reach out to their husbands, helping them become heroes again to their own families.
Martin Luther King Jr.’s powerful “I Have a Dream” speech gained greater notoriety after his untimely death in the sixties. Millions of black Americans were motivated to grab a piece of King’s dream despite not knowing how to make it a reality. The novel Dream in the Panhandle paraphrases King’s famous speech to illuminate the complexities involved in a society’s movement toward equality. The story told through the writings of twelve-year-old Indigo Douglas is set in racially segregated Tallahassee, Florida the day after the news of King’s assassination came across the radio waves. Indigo’s parents' reaction to King’s death causes her to look beyond the world of her close–knit colored community to examine the lives of whites for the first time. Her examination begins with the affluent Whittner family who is her Aunt Sadie’s employer. As the nation grieves, deeply held family secrets are revealed and trigger chaos within the Douglas and Whittner families forcing them to see their commonality as well as their differences. Indigo’s father goes to prison as a result of his pro-King activism. Mr. Whittner risks his wealth as he reveals his Jewish heritage. Indigo’s mother embraces her previously unacknowledged bi-racial identity, while Mrs. Whittner remains vehemently intolerant. The contradictions between race, culture and power in this “coming of age story” become the canvas for Indigo to sketch a new generation’s concept of “King’s dream”.
An NPR Best Book of 2015 Love and sacrifice intertwine in this brilliant debut of rare beauty about a girl dealing with her mother’s schizophrenia and her own mental illness. Fig’s world lies somewhere between reality and fantasy. But as she watches Mama slowly come undone, it becomes hard to tell what is real and what is not, what is fun and what is frightening. To save Mama, Fig begins a fierce battle to bring her back. She knows that her daily sacrifices, like not touching metal one day or avoiding water the next, are the only way to cure Mama. The problem is that in the process of a daily sacrifice, Fig begins to lose herself as well, increasingly isolating herself from her classmates and engaging in self-destructive behavior that only further sets her apart. Spanning the course of Fig’s childhood from age six to nineteen, this deeply provocative novel is more than a portrait of a mother, a daughter, and the struggle that comes with all-consuming love. It is an acutely honest and often painful portrayal of life with mental illness and the lengths to which a young woman must go to handle the ordeals—real or imaginary—thrown her way.
Adam Sandler movies, HBO's Entourage, and such magazines as Maxim and FHM all trade in and appeal to one character the modern boy-man. Addicted to video games, comic books, extreme sports, and dressing down, the boy-man would rather devote an afternoon to Grand Theft Auto than plan his next career move. He would rather prolong the hedonistic pleasures of youth than embrace the self-sacrificing demands of adulthood. When did maturity become the ultimate taboo? Men have gone from idolizing Cary Grant to aping Hugh Grant, shunning marriage and responsibility well into their twenties and thirties. Gary Cross, renowned cultural historian, identifies the boy-man and his habits, examining the attitudes and practices of three generations to make sense of this gradual but profound shift in American masculinity. Cross matches the rise of the American boy-man to trends in twentieth-century advertising, popular culture, and consumerism, and he locates the roots of our present crisis in the vague call for a new model of leadership that, ultimately, failed to offer a better concept of maturity. Cross does not blame the young or glorify the past. He finds that men of the "Greatest Generation" might have embraced their role as providers but were confused by the contradictions and expectations of modern fatherhood. Their uncertainty gave birth to the Beats and men who indulged in childhood hobbies and boyish sports. Rather than fashion a new manhood, baby-boomers held onto their youth and, when that was gone, embraced Viagra. Without mature role models to emulate or rebel against, Generation X turned to cynicism and sensual intensity, and the media fed on this longing, transforming a life stage into a highly desirable lifestyle. Arguing that contemporary American culture undermines both conservative ideals of male maturity and the liberal values of community and responsibility, Cross concludes with a proposal for a modern marriage of personal desire and ethical adulthood.
"What else would you wish for?" Daddy says. "If you could have anything in the world, what would you wish for?" I shrug. "Oh, I don't know. Maybe . . ." "Maybe what?" "For us to live better than we do." He does not say anything. In 1948, award-winning author Ruth White lived in Jewell Valley, a coal camp nestled between the hills of southwestern Virginia, with her mother, still mourning for a baby who died four years earlier; her father, who spent the weekends and most of his pay out drinking; and her three older sisters, Audrey, Yvonne, and Eleanor. Told in Audrey's voice, this is how the author imagines Audrey's experiences during a time of great trauma for the White family – and what happened before they were able to live a better life. This snapshot of life in a coal camp, complete with everyday heartaches and joys – as well as stories, songs, and jokes – is Ruth White's most personal work to date. Little Audrey is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.
When we hear a favorite song, the memories unfold; who we knew, where we were, our age, best friends, lovers, good memories and bad. Even if the memories pour sadness into our hearts, still we listen, remember and slot the events from the past into a song. Alto Reed plays the first soulful notes on “Turn the Page” and Seger grips our hearts with his rich voice. 13 songs written by Seger are in short story form. Each story starts with a problem for at least one character and the song is woven into the story. Enjoy the read!

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