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A collection of insanely funny texts between parents and kids, When Parents Text is a surprisingly affecting window into the complicated time when parents aren’t ready to let go, and kids aren’t ready to be let go. The parents are well-meaning but hopeless, silly and a little corny, and befuddled by the technology. The kids are bewildered yet patient: the perfect straight man. And the authors, two recent college graduates, Lauren Kaelin and Sophia Fraioli, have an unerring editorial instinct to select the funniest, sweetest, quirkiest, most-telling exchanges. There’s the revelatory: Mom: My fingers are saying words. This is amazing. The virtual scolding:Dad: I will deal with your sassy behavior when I get home. Meanwhile have some fiber. The autofill-challenged: Mom: dig up some tadpoles on ur way homo. Me: ummm, what? Mom: It autocorrected me. I mean to say dig up some tadpoles on ur way homo. (4 minutes later) Mom: PICK UP SOME TAMPONS ON YOUR WAY HOME. The manically inappropriate:Mom: Woo Hoo—Ruth died, you know Uncle Lyman’s wife, BUT I have your Braves tickets and check on the table!! And the downright inexplicable:Dad: You could poop your pants in the yankee candle store and no one would know. Launched as a website just last year, www.whenparentstext.com is a phenomenon. It receives 300,000 to 500,000 page views a day, with features in The Huffington Post, Entertainment Weekly, College Humor, and more. When Parents Text includes the best of texts from the website, plus more than 50 percent all-new material never before published. Includes an emoticon glossary and 16-page color insert of MMS texts— multimedia messaging service, aka, bizarre photos from mom and dad. It’s the perfect gift for every text-savvy kid to give to his or her parents.
This volume brings together empirical research that explores interaction in a wide range of educational settings. It includes work that takes a cognitive, brain-based approach to studying interaction, as well as studies that take a social, contextual perspective. Interaction is defined quite broadly, with many chapters focusing on oral interaction as is typical in the field, while other chapters report work that involves interaction between learners and technology. Several studies describe the linguistic and discourse features of interaction between learners and their interlocutors, but others demonstrate how interaction can serve other purposes, such as to inform placement decisions. The chapters in the book collectively illustrate the diversity of contemporary approaches to interaction research, investigating interactions with different interlocutors ( learner-learner, learner-teacher), in a variety of environments (classrooms, interactive testing environments, conversation groups) and through different modalities (oral and written, face-to-face and technology-mediated).
The topics range from the psychological responses to a parent's death such as shock, depression, and guilt, to the practical consequences such as dealing with estates and funerals.
“This is the book parents have been waiting for”—Michael Thompson, coauthor of Raising Cain. The book that is “helpful, hopeful, and engaging”—Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Ph.D., Columbia University. It is the book that addresses the new reality for parents of kids in their 20s and the issues that everyone in the media is talking about: When will this new generation of 20-somethings leave home, find love, start a career, settle down—grow up? And it's the book that will soothe your nerves. It’s loaded with information about what to expect and guidance on what to do when problems arise (as they probably will). In other words, this is the book parents need—Getting to 30, by Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, the world's leading authority on the post-adolescent phase he named emerging adulthood, and Elizabeth Fishel, author of Sisters and other books. As Getting to 30 shows, the road to adulthood is longer than we think—and, for parents, bumpier. It explains what’s really happening to your 18- to 29-year-old, including the story behind your child’s moods. The phenomenon of the boomerang child—and why it’s actually a good thing, for parents and kids. The new landscape of 20-something romance. And it gives all the tools parents need to deal with the challenges, from six ways to listen more than you talk, to knowing when to open (and close) the Bank of Mom and Dad while saving for retirement, to figuring out the protocol for social media. Published in hardcover as When Will My Grown-Up Kid Grow Up?, Getting to 30 includes the latest research on the optimistic and supportive attitude most parents have regarding their 20-something children.
This new edition of When Parents Die will speak to bereaved children of all ages in a very accessible style. Rebecca Abrams draws on both her personal and professional understanding of parental loss to provide the reader with a compassionate and insightful exploration of the experience of losing a parent. When Parents Die has already established itself as an indispensable aid both to the bereaved seeking some understanding of their loss and to the many professionals who work with them. This new edition takes into account new research and theories and considers in more depth: *the continuing importance of the dead parent in ones life *the critical role played by the surviving parent *the experiences of younger children *the impact of divorce and adoption. Retaining its clear, direct and sympathetic style, this text will continue to appeal to the bereaved, their friends and family, counsellors, social workers, doctors, nurses and teachers.
Mobilizing the power of cell phones to maximize students' learning power Teaching Generation Text shows how teachers can turn cell phones into an educational opportunity instead of an annoying distraction. With a host of innovative ideas, activities, lessons, and strategies, Nielsen and Webb offer a unique way to use students' preferred method of communication in the classroom. Cell phones can remind students to study, serve as a way to take notes, provide instant, on-demand answers and research, be a great vehicle for home-school connection, and record and capture oral reports or responses to polls and quizzes, all of which can be used to enhance lesson plans and increase motivation. Offers tactics for teachers to help their students integrate digital technology with their studies Filled with research-based ideas and strategies for using a cell phone to enhance learning Provides methods for incorporating cell phones into instruction with a unit planning guide and lesson plan ideas This innovative new book is filled with new ideas for engaging learners in fun, free, and easy ways using nothing more than a basic, text-enabled cell phone.

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