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Winner of the 2016 Tiptree Award! Longlisted for the 2016 National Book Award for Young People's Literature Stonewall Book Award Honor “McLemore’s second novel is such a lush surprising fable, you half expect birds to fly out of the pages... McLemore uses the supernatural to remind us that the body’s need to speak its truth is primal and profound, and that the connection between two people is no more anyone’s business than why the dish ran away with the spoon.” --Jeff Giles, New York Times Book Review Anna-Marie McLemore’s debut novel The Weight of Feathers was greeted with rave reviews, a YALSA Morris Award nomination, and spots on multiple “Best YA Novels” lists. Now, McLemore delivers a second stunning and utterly romantic novel, again tinged with magic. To everyone who knows them, best friends Miel and Sam are as strange as they are inseparable. Roses grow out of Miel’s wrist, and rumors say that she spilled out of a water tower when she was five. Sam is known for the moons he paints and hangs in the trees and for how little anyone knows about his life before he and his mother moved to town. But as odd as everyone considers Miel and Sam, even they stay away from the Bonner girls, four beautiful sisters rumored to be witches. Now they want the roses that grow from Miel’s skin, convinced that their scent can make anyone fall in love. And they’re willing to use every secret Miel has fought to protect to make sure she gives them up. Atmospheric, dynamic, and packed with gorgeous prose, When the Moon was Ours is another winner from this talented author.
"No one does magical realism quite like McLemore, and this third novel, laced with slow-burning suspense, folklore, romance, and spun together with exquisite, luxuriant prose, proves it.,,, Sheer magic: fierce, bright, and blazing with possibility."— Booklist (starred) Love grows such strange things. Anna-Marie McLemore's debut novel The Weight of Feathers garnered fabulous reviews and was a finalist for the prestigious YALSA Morris Award, and her second novel, When the Moon was Ours, was longlisted for the 2016 National Book Award for Young People's Literature. Now, in Wild Beauty, McLemore introduces a spellbinding setting and two characters who are drawn together by fate—and pulled apart by reality. For nearly a century, the Nomeolvides women have tended the grounds of La Pradera, the lush estate gardens that enchant guests from around the world. They’ve also hidden a tragic legacy: if they fall in love too deeply, their lovers vanish. But then, after generations of vanishings, a strange boy appears in the gardens. The boy is a mystery to Estrella, the Nomeolvides girl who finds him, and to her family, but he’s even more a mystery to himself; he knows nothing more about who he is or where he came from than his first name. As Estrella tries to help Fel piece together his unknown past, La Pradera leads them to secrets as dangerous as they are magical in this stunning exploration of love, loss, and family.
For twenty years, the Palomas and the Corbeaus have been rivals and enemies, locked in an escalating feud for over a generation. Both families make their living as traveling performers in competing shows-the Palomas swimming in mermaid exhibitions, the Corbeaus, former tightrope walkers, performing in the tallest trees they can find. Lace Paloma may be new to her family's show, but she knows as well as anyone that the Corbeaus are pure magia negra, black magic from the devil himself. Simply touching one could mean death, and she's been taught from birth to keep away. But when disaster strikes the small town where both families are performing, it's a Corbeau boy, Cluck, who saves Lace's life. And his touch immerses her in the world of the Corbeaus, where falling for him could turn his own family against him, and one misstep can be just as dangerous on the ground as it is in the trees. Beautifully written, and richly imaginative, Anna-Marie McLemore's The Weight of Feathers is an utterly captivating young adult novel by a talented new voice.
A gorgeous and magical collaboration between two critically acclaimed, powerhouse YA authors offers a richly imagined underdog story perfect for fans of Dumplin’ and Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe. There hasn’t been a winner of the Miss Meteor beauty pageant who looks like Lita Perez or Chicky Quintanilla in all its history. But that’s not the only reason Lita wants to enter the contest, or her ex-best friend Chicky wants to help her. The road to becoming Miss Meteor isn’t about being perfect; it’s about sharing who you are with the world—and loving the parts of yourself no one else understands. So to pull off the unlikeliest underdog story in pageant history, Lita and Chicky are going to have to forget the past and imagine a future where girls like them are more than enough—they are everything.
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Best known for his 1949 post-apocalyptic thriller Earth Abides, George R. Stewart (1895-1980) spent a lifetime wandering the American landscape and writing books about its geography and history. An English professor at the University of California at Berkeley, the exceptional scholar-author penned some of the most remarkable literary works of the 20th century, inventing several types of books along the way--including the road-geography book, micro-history, micro-novel, place-name history, ecological history, and the ecological novel. By weaving human and natural sciences and history into his books Stewart created works with a multi-disciplinary perspective on events and places that influenced numerous other writers, artists, and scientists, including Stephen King, Greg Bear, and Page Stegner. This volume considers George R. Stewart's rich oeuvre while chronicling a life-long quest to uncover the deepest truths about the man and his work.
This carefully crafted ebook: “JULES VERNE Ultimate Collection: Science Fiction Classics, Action & Adventure Novels, Historical Works (Illustrated)” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Novels Five Weeks in a Balloon Journey to the Centre of the Earth From the Earth to the Moon Around the Moon The Adventures of Captain Hatteras In Search of the Castaways Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A Floating City The Adventures of Three Englishmen and Three Russians in South Africa The Fur Country Around the World in Eighty Days The Mysterious Island The Survivors of the Chancellor Michael Strogoff Hector Servadac The Underground City Dick Sand, A Captain at Fifteen The Begum's Fortune Tribulations of a Chinaman in China The Steam House Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon Godfrey Morgan or, The Robinson Crusoe School The Green Ray Mathias Sandorf The Star of the South Ticket No. “9672” Robur the Conqueror The Master of the World The Waif of “Cynthia” North Against South or, Texar's Revenge The Flight to France or, The Memoirs of a Dragoon Kéraban the Inflexible Adrift in Pacific or, Two Years' Vacation Topsy Turvy Cæsar Cascabel Mistress Branican The Castle of the Carpathians Claudius Bombarnac Captain Antifer Facing the Flag An Antarctic Mystery Short Stories A Voyage in a Balloon A Drama in Mexico Master Zacharius A Winter Amid The Ice The Blockade Runners Doctor Ox's Experiment Martin Paz Ascent of Mont Blanc The Mutineers of the Bounty Frritt-Flacc An Express of the Future In The Year 2889 Travel The Exploration of the World The Great Navigators of the 18th Century The Great Explorers of 19th Century Miscellaneous A Chinese Banquet Jules Gabriel Verne (1828-1905) was a French novelist, poet, and playwright best known for his adventure novels and his profound influence on the literary genre of science fiction.
Beloved as a writer of exciting biographies and renowned for his philanthropic essays on almost any subject possible, Plutarch created a diverse range of works that have entertained generations of readers since the days of Imperial Rome. Delphi's Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete works of Plutarch, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1) * Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Plutarch's life and works * Features the complete works of Plutarch, in both English translation and the original Greek * Concise introductions to the works * Provides the complete PARALLEL LIVES and the complete extant essays of MORALIA, for the first time in digital printing * Includes many translations previously appearing in Loeb Classical Library editions of Plutarch's works * Excellent formatting of the texts * Easily locate the biographies and treatises you want to read with individual contents tables * Features two bonus biographies - discover Plutarch's ancient world * Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles CONTENTS: The Translations PARALLEL LIVES MORALIA The Greek Texts LIST OF GREEK TEXTS The Biographies INTRODUCTION TO PLUTARCH by Bernadotte Perrin LIFE OF PLUTARCH by Aubrey Stewart Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles
The moon had reached its maximum three times since the Chacoans conquered the First Moon People. The Chaco matrons had built their Great House high atop First Moon Mountain, and their warriors stalked arrogantly through the villages, taking what they pleased. But the gods can only stand so much human arrogance. Cold Bringing Woman, the goddess of winter, calls upon young Ripple to embark on a perilous quest to destroy the hated Chacoans. But Ripple will not face the task alone; he is aided by his stalwart friends: Wrapped Wrist, a short lothario; Spots, scarred at birth, and aide to the frightening witch, Nightshade; and Bad Cast, a simple family man, who will do anything to free his people. But the blessed matrons will brook no insurgency. In retaliation, war chief Leather Hand and his warriors embark on a campaign of terror so gruesome it remains unrivaled in the annals of prehistory. It all comes to a climax atop the mountain we now know as Chimney Rock. In the white light of the lunar maximum, the Pueblo gods will dance—and an empire will be engulfed in flames and mayhem. From New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear, People of the Moon is a story of North America's Forgotten Past—the battles fought, the heroes made, and the cultures that thrived in America's prehistory. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.
The telephone marks the place of an absence. Affiliated with discontinuity, alarm, and silence, it raises fundamental questions about the constitution of self and other, the stability of location, systems of transfer, and the destination of speech. Profoundly changing our concept of long-distance, it is constantly transmitting effects of real and evocative power. To the extent that it always relates us to the absent other, the telephone, and the massive switchboard attending it, plugs into a hermeneutics of mourning. The Telephone Book, itself organized by a "telephonic logic," fields calls from philosophy, history, literature, and psychoanalysis. It installs a switchboard that hooks up diverse types of knowledge while rerouting and jamming the codes of the disciplines in daring ways. Avital Ronell has done nothing less than consider the impact of the telephone on modern thought. Her highly original, multifaceted inquiry into the nature of communication in a technological age will excite everyone who listens in. The book begins by calling close attention to the importance of the telephone in Nazi organization and propaganda, with special regard to the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. In the Third Reich the telephone became a weapon, a means of state surveillance, "an open accomplice to lies." Heidegger, in Being and Time and elsewhere, elaborates on the significance of "the call." In a tour de force response, Ronell mobilizes the history and terminology of the telephone to explicate his difficult philosophy. Ronell also speaks of the appearance of the telephone in the literary works of Duras, Joyce, Kafka, Rilke, and Strindberg. She examines its role in psychoanalysis—Freud said that the unconscious is structured like a telephone, and Jung and R. D. Laing saw it as a powerful new body part. She traces its historical development from Bell's famous first call: "Watson, come here!" Thomas A. Watson, his assistant, who used to communicate with spirits, was eager to get the telephone to talk, and thus to link technology with phantoms and phantasms. In many ways a meditation on the technologically constituted state, The Telephone Book opens a new field, becoming the first political deconstruction of technology, state terrorism, and schizophrenia. And it offers a fresh reading of the American and European addiction to technology in which the telephone emerges as the crucial figure of this age.
A famous film director, a cinematographer, an artist, and a novelist team up to make a movie in which the world, called Medialennium, is controlled not by governments but by media conglomerates. Mergers have created economic totalitarianism. Nation states are obsolete, and politics is symbolic ritual. The movie producers are also the actors. Their roles are made up of their real-life relationships, and the movie includes both script and documentary sequences. In the movie, an incumbent governor is running against a Chicano whose platform includes the secession of California to join Mexico, and shooting the movie in LA creates an alchemy that turns into a psychological and political thriller.
Explores the work of novelists including Naguib Mahfouz, 'Abd al-Khaliq al-Rikabi, Jamal al-Ghitani, Ben Salem Himmich, Ali Mubarak, Adonis, Mahmoud Darwish and Nizar Qabbani to show how the development of the Arabic novel has created a politics of nostal
In A Corpse in the Koryo, James Church introduced readers to one of the most unique detectives to appear on page in years--the elusive Inspector O. The stunning mystery was named one of the best mystery/thrillers of 2006 by the Chicago Tribune for its beautifully spare prose and layered descriptions of a terrain Church knows by heart. And now the Inspector is back. In Hidden Moon, Inspector O returns from a mission abroad to find his new police commander waiting at his office door. There has been a bank robbery--the first ever in Pyongyang--and the commander demands action, and quickly. But is this urgency for real? Somewhere, someone in the North Korean leadership doesn't want Inspector O to complete his investigation. And why not? What if the robbery leads to the highest levels of the regime? What if power, not a need for cash, is the real reason behind the heist at the Gold Star Bank? Given a choice, this isn't a trail a detective in the Pyongyang police would want to follow all the way to the end, even a trail marked with monogrammed silk stockings. "I'm not sure I know where the bank is," is O's laconic observation as the warning bells go off in his head. A Scottish policeman sent to provide security for a visiting British official, a sultry Kazakh bank manager, and a mournful fellow detective all combine to put O in the middle of a spiderweb of conspiracies that becomes more tangled, and dangerous, the more he pulls on the threads. Once again, as he did in A Corpse in the Koryo, James Church opens a window onto a society where nothing is quite as it seems. The story serves as the reader's flashlight, illuminating a place that outsiders imagine is always dark and too far away to know. Church's descriptions of the country and its people are spare and starkly beautiful; the dialogue is lean, every thought weighed and measured before it is spoken. Not a word is wasted, because in this place no one can afford to be misunderstood. Critical Acclaim for A Corpse in the Koryo "A Corpse in the Koryo is a crackling good mystery novel, filled with unusual characters involved in a complex plot that keeps you guessing to the end." --Glenn Kessler, The Washington Post "The best unclassified account of how North Korea works and why it has survived . . . This novel should be required bedtime reading for President Bush and his national security team." --Peter Hayes, executive director of the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development "A new offering that reminds you of why you started reading mysteries and thrillers in the first place." --Chicago Tribune "What's perhaps most remarkable---and appealing---about A Corpse in the Koryo is the tremendously clever complexity (and deceptions) of the plot. The reader is left to marvel at the author's ability to keep his readers on their intellectual toes for almost three hundred pages. We can only hope that Church has many more novels up his sleeve." --Tampa Tribune "An impressive debut that calls to mind such mystery thrillers as Martin Cruz Smith's Gorky Park." --Publishers Weekly (starred review) "In Inspector O, the author has crafted a complex character with rough charm to spare, and in eternally static North Korea, he has a setting that will fascinate readers for sequels to come." --Time magazine (Asia edition)
With The Shanghai Moon, S. J. Rozan returns to her award-winning, critically acclaimed, and much-loved characters Lydia Chin and Bill Smith in the first new novel in the series in seven years. Estranged for months from fellow P.I. Bill Smith, Chinese-American private investigator Lydia Chin is brought in by colleague and former mentor Joel Pilarsky to help with a case that crosses continents, cultures, and decades. In Shanghai, excavation has unearthed a cache of European jewelry dating back to World War II, when Shanghai was an open city providing safe haven for thousands of Jewish refugees. The jewelry, identifed as having belonged to one such refugee - Rosalie Gilder - was immediately stolen by a Chinese official who fled to New York City. Hired by a lawyer specializing in the recovery of Holocaust assets, Chin and Pilarsky are to find any and all leads to the missing jewels. However, Lydia soon learns that there is much more to the story than they've been told: The Shanghai Moon, one of the world's most sought after missing jewels, reputed to be worth millions, is believed to have been part of the same stash. Before Lydia can act on this new information, Joel Pilarsky is murdered, Lydia is fired from the case, and Bill Smith finally reappears on the scene. Now Lydia and Bill must unravel the truth about the Shanghai Moon and the events that surrounded its disappearance sixty years ago during the chaos of war and revolution, if they are to stop more killings and uncover the truth of what is going on today.
Louise Lee Hsiu, an award-winning Taiwanese writer who had published ten books in Taiwan before moving to Canada in 2002. Because she wants more English-speaking people to understand her home country Taiwan, she has translated Penghu Moon in the Well from Chinese to English. In fact, it was this book's financial success that enabled her to immigrate to Canada. The novel begins in Waian Penghu, Taiwan, the place of her parent's birth, and then shifts to the Taiwanese port, Kaohsiung, when her parents move there. In 1895, Ch'ing Dynasty was forced to sign the Treaty of Shimonoseki, ceding Taiwan and Penghu to Japan, and so this historic event forms the background of Penghu Moon in the Well. The character, Lee Lian-Zi, who embodies the author herself, narrates the lives of four generations of two Penghu families. There are novels that present tragic epic histories and others that portray the loving bonds that sustain families, and this one is both. Below are four comments about this book: 1. This novel is outstanding. It fully reflects the historical time, social movement of each stage of Taiwan from the end of the Ch'ing Dynasty (1895) to the 1980's. It presents the details of daily public life and the distress of the people in Penghu under the rule of a foreign nation---Japan. The local history of Penghu Islands is the epitome of the whole historical situation of Taiwan - Dr.Ye, renowned Taiwanese historian and novelist. 2. It is very easy to learn about the history of Taiwanese people in Chinese textbooks, but you won't learn Taiwan's authentic history, including that of Taiwan's Penghu Islands. Louise's family history originates in Penghu, so she can write authentically about the history of Taiwan and Penghu. Penghu Moon in the Well is not only a successful novel, but it also reveals actual historical events. - Wang Jiaxiang, Editor, Taiwan Times 3. "Louise's novel affirms that we are all connected, for better or for worse, forever and ever. We travel in a never-ending circle because we want to return home, to the source, to the light at the end of the tunnel." - Barbara Ladouceur, Canadian Writer 4. "I learned a great deal about Taiwan and Penghu, the people, culture and history. The characterizations and descriptions bring us right into the place. I can see why this book has sold very well there. It has made me very curious to visit Penghu and Taiwan." - Jo Blackmore, Publisher, Vancouver Granville Island Publishing
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From the acclaimed author of the bestselling Beneath a Scarlet Sky comes Outlaw, "A true juggernaut . . . pure adrenaline in print . . . a Jason Bourne for the new millennium." —James Rollins While conducting top-secret negotiations aboard a tanker in the South China Sea, the U.S. Secretary of State and the foreign ministers of China and India are kidnapped, and the tanker they are on is hijacked. The "Sons of Prophecy" take responsibility and issue an ultimatum: If their demands are not met in seven days, the three will be beheaded live on the Internet. With the presidential election in only eight days, sitting President Sands, about to leave office, calls in former CIA operative and master thief Robin Monarch and convinces him to save the diplomats before the threatened execution. Monarch and his counterpart, a mysterious Chinese agent named Song Le, embark upon a dangerous journey into the underbelly of Southeast Asia, a world of corrupt Vietnamese Army officers, fanatical pirates, Hong Kong triad leaders, and volatile mercenaries living around the red light districts of Thailand. As they get closer and closer, with time quickly running out, Monarch learns that the daring kidnapping and ransom pot diabolical plot is only a front. Behind it is another plot, one designed to alter the outcome of the election itself, a conspiracy that reaches deep inside the White House, back to the very people who hired Monarch in the first place.
Raised in rural isolation, Alyson Hampton is bereft after the death of her aristocratic English grandfather. Introduced to society, she is horrified to learn that her illegitimacy—and the wealth she’s inherited—leave her a target for fortune hunters. Fleeing the only home she’s ever known, she nearly falls prey to her devilish cousin, until a dashing Scotsman comes to her rescue. Thanks to the hated English, Rory, Laird Maclean, is the last of his family. He is a wanted rebel in England, a smuggler in the Americas, and intent on buying back his former home. Then the wealthiest—most virtuous—heiress in all the kingdom falls into his lap. What’s a blackguard to do when smitten by this virtuous beauty? Alyson insists on marriage. Rory would sooner rob an Englishwoman than marry one. Even should love find a way, the Maclean is reluctant to trade her virtue for the price on his head... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ “Ms. Rice is a surefire bet to steal your heart away…” Romantic Times Reviews
In a land where there is constant migration, can there be a "homeland"? In the United States, migration is initially experienced as immigration, but the process never achieves closure. Migration continues as transience - restless, unsettled movement across social and economic classes, states, and national borders. In this nuanced study grounded in literature, history, and popular culture, Joseph Urgo demonstrates that American culture and our sense of national identity are permeated by unrelenting, incessant, and psychic mobility across spatial, historical, and imaginative planes of existence. There is no better example of a writer reflecting on this migratory consciousness than Willa Cather. At home in numerous locations - Nebraska, New York, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Maine, and Canada - Cather infused her novels with the cultural vitality that is a consequence of transience. By locating transience at the center of his conception of our national culture, Urgo redefines the mythos of American national identity and global empire. He concludes with an analysis of a potential "New World Order" in which migration replaces homeland as the foundation of world power.
The Ruppert Mundys, once the greatest baseball team in America, are now in a terminal decline, their line-up filled with a disreputable assortment of old men, drunks and even amputees. Around them baseball itself seems to be collapsing, brought down by a bizarre mixture of criminality, stupidity, and The Great Communist Conspiracy, aimed at the very heart of the American way of life. In this hilarious and wonderfully eccentric novel Philip Roth turns his attention to one of the most beloved of all American rituals: baseball. Players, tycoons and the paying public are all targets as Roth satirises the dense tapestry of myths and legends that have grown up around The Great American Pastime.

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