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A collection of stories set in the Southwest. They range from The Wives, in which two women swap stories about a mutual ex-husband, to Carmen, on a woman serving as a drug courier for her husband.
An intimate and uplifting book about finding renewal and hope through grief and loss. “It was a terrible life; it was an enchanted life; it was a blessed life. And, of course, one day it ended.” —Sharon Butala In the tradition of Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking, Diana Athill’s Somewhere Towards the End, and Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal comes a revelatory new book from one of our beloved writers. When Sharon Butala’s husband, Peter, died unexpectedly, she found herself with no place to call home. Torn by grief and loss, she fled the ranchlands of southwest Saskatchewan and moved to the city, leaving almost everything behind. A lifetime of possessions was reduced to a few boxes of books, clothes, and keepsakes. But a lifetime of experience went with her, and a limitless well of memory—of personal failures, of a marriage that everybody said would not last but did, of the unbreakable bonds of family. Reinventing herself in an urban landscape was painful, and facing her new life as a widow tested her very being. Yet out of this hard-won new existence comes an astonishingly frank, compassionate and moving memoir that offers not only solace and hope but inspiration to those who endure profound loss. Often called one of this country’s true visionaries, Sharon Butala shares her insights into the grieving process and reveals the small triumphs and funny moments that kept her going. Where I Live Now is profound in its understanding of the many homes women must build for themselves in a lifetime.
The point of departure for this collection is a translation of excerpts from Zwischenstadt by Thomas Sieverts.
Where We Live Now explores the ways in which immigration is reshaping American neighborhoods. In his examination of residential segregation patterns, John Iceland addresses these questions: What evidence suggests that immigrants are assimilating residentially? Does the assimilation process change for immigrants of different racial and ethnic backgrounds? How has immigration affected the residential patterns of native-born blacks and whites? Drawing on census data and information from other ethnographic and quantitative studies, Iceland affirms that immigrants are becoming residentially assimilated in American metropolitan areas. While the future remains uncertain, the evidence provided in the book suggests that America's metropolitan areas are not splintering irrevocably into hostile, homogeneous, and ethnically based neighborhoods. Instead, Iceland's findings suggest a blurring of the American color line in the coming years and indicate that as we become more diverse, we may in some important respects become less segregated.
This book tells you a great deal about how to evaluate and select housing accommodations for the aging seniors in your life or loved ones in deteriorating health and reveals information that administrators at assisted living facilities, home health agencies and CCRC’s, for example, may not tell you unless you ask. It explores many housing options that boomers and seniors need to consider when making housing decisions at a critical time in their lives.
Soon after fifteen year old Daisy arrives at her aunt's farm in England her aunt goes away on business, leaving Daisy with four cousins she's never met--the next day when London is attacked by an unnamed enemy, power fails, systems fail, the farm becomes more isolated with no adults in charge and no rules, and yet the cousins' uncanny bond grows into something extraordinary as time passes. Reprint.
Diana loves where she lives. She loves the astronomy charts on her walls and the fact that she can wave to her best friend, Rose, from her very own window. And best of all, a wren has recently made its home right by her front door! When her family is forced to move, Diana wonders if she?ll ever find that same grounded and happy feeling again. This gentle and ultimately redeeming story in poems is about those secure and fulfilling friendships that happen naturally and easily when you live right next door, and the struggles of losing the comfort of a familiar place. Matt Phelan's warm and expressive illustrations perfectly complement Eileen Spinelli's tenderhearted and unique tale that reminds us that sometimes a little uprooting and change is necessary for growth.

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