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This book offers a critique of the all pervasive Western notion that other communities often live in a timeless present. Who Needs the Past? provides first-hand evidence of the interest non-Western, non-academic communities have in the past.
Collection of papers presented at the World Archaeological Congress 1986 within the theme Archaeological objectivity in interpretation; papers present evidence non-Western, non-academic communities have an interest in the past and its interpretation; papers by A.K. Chase , M. Clunies Ross and Nancy Williams and Daymbalipu Mununggurr are annotated separately.
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Over the last thirty years issues of culture, identity and meaning have moved out of the academic sphere to become central to politics and society at all levels from the local to the global. Archaeology has been at the forefront of these moves towards a greater engagement with the non-academic world, often in an extremely practical and direct way, for example in the disputes about the repatriation of human burials. Such disputes have been central to the recognition that previously marginalised groups have rights in their own past which are important for their future. The essays in this book look back at some of the most important events where a role for an archaeology concerned with the past in the present first emerged and look forward to the practical and theoretical issues now central to a socially engaged discipline and shaping its future. This book is published in honour of Professor Peter Ucko, who has played an unparalleled role in promoting awareness of the core issues in this volume among archaeologists.
How do you get food and water? Long ago, people needed food and water, too. How did they get these things? The answers, and much more, are in this book!
This is a new edition of Greenfield's pioneering study about the legal, political and historical aspects of cultural restitution.
The idea of prehistory dates from the nineteenth century, but Richard Bradley contends that it is still a vital area for research. He argues that it is only through a combination of oral tradition and the experience of encountering ancient material culture that people were able to formulate a sense of their own pasts without written records. The Past in Prehistoric Societies presents case studies which extend from the Palaeolithic to the early Middle Ages and from the Alps to Scandinavia. It examines how archaeologists might study the origin of myths and the different ways in which prehistoric people would have inherited artefacts from the past. It also investigates the ways in which ancient remains might have been invested with new meanings long after their original significance had been forgotten. Finally, the author compares the procedures of excavation and field survey in the light of these examples. The work includes a large number of detailed case studies, is fully illustrated and has been written in an extremely accessible style.
In this book, psychotherapist David Richo explores how we replay the past in our present-day relationships—and how we can free ourselves from this destructive pattern. We all have a tendency to transfer potent feelings, needs, expectations, and beliefs from childhood or from former relationships onto the people in our daily lives, whether they are our intimate partners, friends, or acquaintances. When the Past Is Present helps us to become more aware of the ways we slip into the past so that we can identify our emotional baggage and take steps to unpack it and put it where it belongs. Drawing on decades of experience as a psychotherapist, Richo helps readers to: • Understand how the wounds of childhood become exposed in adult relationships—and why this is a gift • Identify and heal the emotional wounds we carry over from the past so that they won't sabotage present-day relationships • Recognize how strong attractions and aversions to people in the present can be signals of own own unfinished business • Use mindfulness to stay in the present moment and cultivate authentic intimacy
A concise, readable introduction to epidemiology for archaeologists and primer on archaeological analysis for epidemiologists, the volume shows how to assess illness and mortality in archaeological populations.
Richard Brodie dropped out of Harvard to join the computer revolution and write the first version of Microsoft Word. Then, burned-out helping Microsoft achieve its phenomenal success, he quit and embarked on an equally intense search for a more meaningful life. For three years Richard mined the wisdom of famed self improvement seminars and workshops. Most of all, he wanted to discover why life seemed to coast along at either an ''OK''level or plummet into ''the pits, ''spending so little time in true satisfaction and fulfillment. In this book, he shares the results of his odyssey, providing a step by step guide for discovering your own individual formula for long term success and happiness. It gives you all the tools you need to find yourself, take charge, and get past OK You'll learn how to: Understand what's really going on in your life Make the most of your potential Pull out of crises-and move on Achieve rewarding relationships Be in control of stressful situations Keep your quality of life in the WOW zone
During the 1980s Illich added another dimension to his thought through the study of Medieval history. In the current volume he aims to demonstrate the extent to which the groundwork for the institutions that characterize our world today was laid in the twelfth century.
Discusses nostalgia, history, and preservation, explains how the past influences the future, and analyzes modern feelings toward the past
"First published as The past is a foreign country, 1985"--Title page verso.

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